Loud Speaker Cocktail

Loud Speaker Cocktail

Loud Speaker Cocktail

1/8 Lemon Juice. (1/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/8 Cointreau. (1/4 oz Cointreau)
3/8 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore Distiller’s Gin #6)
3/8 Brandy. (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This it is what gives to Radio Announcers their peculiar enunciation. Three of them will produce oscillation and after five it is possible to reach the osculation stage.

Dictionary.com gives 4 possible definitions of “osculation”.

os·cu·la·tion
–noun
1. the act of kissing.
2. a kiss.
3. close contact.
4. Geometry. the contact between two osculating curves or the like.

The wikipedia gives an additional definition for osculate, “to bring into focus or tune, to attune.” Which makes the most sense to me, at least in this context.

Kind of a pain in the ass to measure, but an enjoyable light, dry cocktail, all the same.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Luigi Cocktail

Luigi Cocktail

Luigi Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 tsp. Fee’s American Beauty Grenadine)
1 Dash Cointreau. (1/3 tsp. Cointreau)
The Juice of 1/2 Tangerine. (Scant juice 1/2 small orange)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

According to Robert Vermeire, in his book “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”:

This cocktail was invented by Mr. Luigi Naintre, the proprietor of the Embassy Club, who became famous at Romano’s, Ciro’s, and the Criterion.  He is one of the best known restauranteurs in the world and has an enormous and faithful following wherever he goes.  This cocktail is one of the most popular in London.

Unfortunately, it is just the wrong season for Tangerines or Mandarins. None to be found anywhere ’round these parts. I suppose they might be in season somewhere in the Southern Hemisphere?

Anyway, this certainly is a red cocktail when made with the Fee’s Grenadine. Almost worryingly pink.

I can see how it would be better with Tangerine or Mandarin juice, as is almost any cocktail you care to name, not to mention homemade grenadine, but still… It’s a fine, refreshing cocktail, just not fantastic, at least to me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lord Suffolk Cocktail

Lord Suffolk

Lord Suffolk Cocktail

1/8 Italian Vermouth. (1/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/8 Cointreau. (1/4 oz Cointreau)
5/8 Gin. (1 1/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/8 Maraschino. (1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon peel.)

Whichever Lord of Suffolk this cocktail refers to, he certainly had a sweet tooth!

It’s actually a pretty tasty cocktail with the funk of the Maraschino out front, just really, really sweet.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Little Devil Cocktail

Little Devil

Little Devil Cocktail

1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 Cointreau. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Montecristo White Rum)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore No. 6)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In Harry McElhone’s “Barflies and Cocktails” he sez this recipe comes “from Fitz, Ciro’s Bar, London, my late apt pupil.”

A bit similar to the Blue Devil or Bacardi Special, it’s not bad. Dry and mostly ginny. The Montecristo White seems to act mostly as an extender to the gin. I have to admit lately, at Cointreau kind of sweetness levels, I do kind of prefer giving a slight advantage to the liqueur lately rather than the lemon. Something like 3/4 oz of Cointreau and 1/2 oz of Lemon would be about right at my sweet spot at this point in my life for this cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

“Hoop La!” Cocktail

Hoop La!

“Hoop La!” Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/4 Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Brandy. (3/4 oz Cerbois VSOP Armangac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

Well, this is exactly the same as the Frank Sullivan Cocktail, and I’m making it with the same ingredients. Not much too exciting there. Still, an enjoyable cocktail, and I don’t mind at all repeating it. Though, my fast dwindling bottle of Cocchi Americano makes me a bit sad…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Frank Sullivan Cocktail

Frank Sullivan Cocktail

1/4 Glass Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/4 Glass Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Glass Brandy. (3/4 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I guess Frank preferred Brandy in his Corpse Reviver No. 2!

This is a fine, light cocktail, but I have to admit I really missed the dash of Absinthe.

Not sure entirely which Frank Sullivan this was named after, but there was an American journalist, humorist, and author associated with the New Yorker magazine for much of the 20th Century with that name. Sullivan also had some associations with the Algonquin Round table of the 1920s. According to this website, Guide to the Frank Sullivan Collection, he was a Cornell Grad and corresponded with the likes of P.G. Woodhouse, E.B. White, James Thurber, and even James Cagney and Eleanor Roosevelt(!).

Seems like you might need a drink after composing the New Yorker Christmas Poem for half of the 20th Century!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Frankenjack Cocktail


The Frankenjack Cocktail

1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore No. 6)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/6 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz Haus Alpenz Blumme Marillen Apricot Eau-de-Vie)
1/6 Cointreau. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Cointreau)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

About a million years ago (OK less than a year) we made this very same cocktail as the Claridge Cocktail. At the time, there was some speculation about whether Apricot Liqueur or Apricot Eau-de-Vie was the appropriate “Apricot Brandy”. Knowing the Frankenjack was coming up eventually, I put off giving it a try.

I also asked Matt Rowley what he thought the appropriate substance would be. He thought neither distilled Apricot Eau-de-Vie or imported Apricot Liqueur were particularly likely for a prohibition era cocktail. He felt, more likely, it was a home made concoction made from rehydrated dried apricots macerated in alcohol and sweetened enough to take the edge off.

This time, though, I was going to use the Apricot Eau-de-Vie. I gave the Blume Marillen a smell, and tried to imagine which gin would go best with it. Tanqueray was handy and didn’t seem promising, nor did No. 209. Aviation seemed kind of close. Then I checked the smell of a recently purchased bottle of North Shore Distillery Gin No. 6. “Ding! Ding! Ding!” as Mario Batali would say.

Initially, I didn’t really have a lot of hope that this cocktail would be very good, but the unusual flavors of the No. 6 work really well with the Apricot Eau-de-Vie. The No. 6 is not at all a traditionally flavored gin, but it has some floral-fruit flavors and smells that really complement the Blume Marillen. The flavor of the cocktail brought back real or imagined memories of some half remembered European hard candy from my youth. I was actually kind of chortling as I was tasting it.

I think a dash of orange bitters, a decent cherry garnish, and this would be a real winner of a cocktail.

According to Judge Jr, the Frankenjack was:

Invented by the two proprietors of a very, very well-known speakeasy in New York City.

Hmmm…. I wonder if they were Frank and Jack of the legendary Frank and Jack’s?

From “On the Town in New York” by Michael Batterberry:

More typical was Frank and Jack’s, a jolly place where there were generally a hundred people jammed into a tiny kitchen barely large enough to hold three tables. Among those struggling for air and room enough to laugh might be Jimmy Durante, Pat Rooney, or Peggy Hopkins Joyce. It was Frank and Jack who perfected the gambit of getting rid of one drunk by asking him to assist another out the door.

And, uh, oops! I didn’t realize until I wrote up this post, that I had gotten the amounts for the Vermouth and Apricot Brandy flipped. Well, damn it, it looks like I have made a new cocktail. Maybe the FrankErikJack?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fine and Dandy Cocktail


Fine and Dandy Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, it is a “Fine and Dandy” cocktail. It doesn’t quite match the special magic of either the Pegu Club or the Sidecar. Still, all in all, quite enjoyable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Dodge Special Cocktail

The Dodge Special Cocktail

1/2 Gin. (generous 1 oz Beefeaters)
1/2 Cointreau or Mint. (Generous 1 oz Cointreau)
1 Dash Grape Juice. (Dash Twin Hill Ranch Grape Juice)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is another prohibition era libation from Judge Jr.’s “Here’s How”.

With Cointreau and the proportions above, this is so awful as to be puzzling. I would describe the flavor as, “orangey and slightly grapey aftershave”. The harshness of the Cointreau really stands out. I don’t know that mint would be much of an improvement. Maybe. Well, the cocktail is an attractive color.

Grape and orange isn’t a bad combo, though, so I poured the above down the sink and tried again. 3/4 oz Gin; 3/4 oz Cointreau; 3/4 oz Grape Juice; shake & strain. With a complex and slightly tannic grape juice, like the Twin Hill, this isn’t bad at all.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Corpse Reviver, Revisited

When I wrote about the Corpse Reviver No. 2, I explored the variation with Swedish Punsch instead of Lillet (or Cocchi Americano) and found I preferred the version with Cocchi Americano.

However, recently a friend mentioned they’d been enjoying the same cocktail with the version of Arrack Punch I made for Tales. I wanted to revisit same.

So when Brian Ellison, from Death’s Door Spirits, called me and asked if I wanted to help out with his booth at the Slow Food Expo here in San Francisco, the first drink that came to mind was a Corpse Reviver with my home made Arrack Punch.

I mean, c’mon, if there is a more appropriate drink to make with Death’s Door Gin than a Corpse Reviver, I have no idea what it is. Plus, it has a whole home made angle…

So I made another 3 liter batch of Arrack Punch, sent him the list of other ingredients, and put it on my calendar.

We served them Saturday night and Sunday morning. This evening my arms and shoulders are still sore from shaking cocktails. But, wow, what a great response! Many folks just surprised that they would even enjoy a cocktail made with gin. Others who were coming back, and some telling me that their friends had told them they had to try that “Corpse drink”. And a group from Chow.com, I probably should have cut off, as they were probably responsible for drinking a quarter of the Corpse Reviver mix I had prepared. But hey, they kept coming back and telling me how great it was…

So anyway, if you’re keeping track:

Corpse Reviver No. 2a

3/4 oz Gin
3/4 oz Homemade Swedish Punch
3/4 oz Cointreau
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
dash Absinthe

Shake and strain into a cocktail glass.

For what it is worth, the earliest I find this variation on the Corpse Reviver No. 2 is in the 1948 edition of Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “The Official Mixer’s Manual” edited, revised, and expanded by James Beard.

In earlier editions of Duffy’s book, the more traditional Kina Lillet is called for.