Special (Rough) Cocktail

Special (Rough) Cocktail
1 Dash Absinthe.
1/2 Applejack. (1 oz Laird’s Apple Brandy)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Osocalis Alambic Brandy
Shake well and strain into cocktail.

Well, sometimes people are just drinking to get themselves somewhere else. Out of their head, out of their life, out of their city.

And I guess this is a fast train out of town.

On the other hand, the name is pretty accurate. This is a rough way to go, more like hopping a freight train than riding in a luxury sleeper cab.

I hesitate to call it a complete waste of perfectly good booze, but I will go on record saying I would have rathered just drunk the brandy on its own.

It’s also been made not too long ago, as the slightly differently punctuated, “Special Rough Cocktail“.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Oh Harry! Cocktail

Oh Harry! Cocktail
Saturate 1 lump of Sugar with Raspberry Syrup or Grenadine. (sugar cube saturated with Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/3 Vermouth. (Dolin Blanc Vermouth)
2/3 Hooch Whisky. (Buffalo Trace Unaged Whiskey)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I needed to pick up something from Slanted Door this last Friday, so I thought I would take the chance to annoy the bar staff there, with a particularly annoying Savoy recipe.

“Hooch Whiskey”? What is that? The recipe doesn’t say what sort of vermouth. Doesn’t even really tell you what to do with the sugar cube, or the point of saturating it with syrup.

Fortunately, Jennifer Colliau, of Small Hand Foods was behind the bar and said, “What if we use Blanc Vermouth and just make this a “White Man” with a sugar cube?”

I dunno, as much as I like White Manhattans, this didn’t quite work. A bitters soaked cube would have made a lot more sense, or as Jennifer pointed out, some sort of sparkling wine to act upon the cube and circulate the flavors.

Maybe if we had muddled the cube into the drink?

I dunno, I still think even then the “Oh Harry!” doesn’t quite live up to its name.

It’s definitely no, “Oh sweet mystery of life, I have found you,” type of drink.

But maybe, you took what you could get during prohibition.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Mr. Manhattan Cocktail

Hey, wait, “Mr. Manhattan,” that sounds familiar! Why, yes, we made the Mr. Manhattan with Neyah White at NOPA a couple years ago. Well, who’s going to complain about making this Julep-ish cocktail again. Heck, it was so warm this week, I’m even going to leave it on cracked ice.

Mr. Manhattan Cocktail
Crush 1 Lump of Sugar in a little water. (1 Demerara Sugar Cube)
Crush 4 Leaves of Fresh Green Mint.
1 Dash Lemon Juice. (Squeeze Meyer Lemon Juice)
4 Dashes Orange Juice. (Squeeze Blood Orange Juice)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Bols Genever)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Or build and add crushed ice, stir, and garnish with mint sprigs.

I have a pretty serious, “one and done,” policy with Savoy Cocktails, and sometimes it is a struggle to get home, get everything together, and make the damn cocktail.

However, looking at this video, I see a lot of mistakes were made in the execution of this version of the Mr. Manhattan.

My first mistake was being literal and using a sugar cube. There’s no reason, really, to use a sugar cube in a cocktail. They just don’t dissolve well enough unless you spend about a half an hour muddling the damn thing. Use simple syrup, superfine, or at least caster sugar any time you are mixing drinks. My second mistake was that it’s really apparent I over squeezed the Meyer Lemon and undersqueezed the orange. I should have been using a measuring cup, so the juice wasn’t going right into the drink. Last, I used the stupid wrong spoon to mix with. I should have grabbed the spoon with the disk end, so I could do a good job of churning up this julep-ish version of the Mr. Manhattan.

All the same, this wasn’t bad at all, if a bit dry. There are definitely a lot of good points to the Genever Mr. Manhattan and I strongly recommend it as a drink. Just do a better job of mixing it than I did.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Karl K. Kitchen Cocktail

Cocktails Suitable for A Prohibition Country.

The following cocktails are especially suited for those countries where they make the best of Prohibition, and where the ingredients for making them are obtainable without much difficulty.

Karl K. Kitchen Cocktail
1/4 White Grape Juice. (1/2 oz Santa Cruz Organic White Grape Juice)
4 Dashes Grenadine or Raspberry Syrup. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
3/4 Scotch Whisky. (1 oz Famous Grouse, 1/2 oz John Mark and Robbo’s Smokey Peaty One)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

You know, there’s this discussion, is someone who mixes up drinks a Bartender or a Mixologist? Generally, we say, someone who makes up drinks and doesn’t work behind a bar can call themselves a Mixologist, if they want to use a made up, vaguely scientific, name for what they do. Well, instead of “Dipsologist”.

So, I guess Karl K. Kitchen was out of Dry Vermouth during prohibition and used White Grape Juice instead.

Right now, I’m going to go on the line and say, “Karl K. Kitchen, that was a very bad idea.”

Pretty sure you qualify as neither a Bartender or a Mixologist.

I mean, I was expecting this to be bad, but it is just really bad.

Well, OK, it isn’t quite as bad as the completely inexplicable Wembley Cocktail (No. 2), with its combination of Scotch, Dry Vermouth, and Pineapple Juice, but still, pretty darn bad.

Karl K. Kitchen, of the New York World, is not a metropolitan but a cosmopolitan newspaper man, who from Petrograd to Paducah is rated as one who is distinctly ‘in the know.’”

Back to the newroom for you, Mr. Kitchen, you know a bit less than you think.

If this cocktail is any indication, I will be longing for “Non-Alcoholic” libations pretty shortly. It’s no wonder people would drink just about anything during Prohibition.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.