Apple Jack (Special) Cocktail

Apple Jack (Special) Cocktail

2/3 Applejack. (2 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy)
1/6 Grenadine. (1/2 oz home made Grenadine*)
1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The Apple Jack (Special) Cocktail almost falls within what I would call “free pour error” of the nominally drier Jack Rose (in the Savoy the Jack Rose is: Juice of 1/2 lemon or whole lime, 1/4 Grenadine, 3/4 Apple Jack). Tasty stuff. Homemade Grenadine, fresh lemon juice, and the Bonded Apple Jack make a world of difference in this cocktail. Yum.

*1 Cup Pomegranate Juice (Knudsen Just Pomegranate)
1 Cup Sugar
1/4 Cup Pomegranate Concentrate
1/4 Cup Vodka

Combine sugar with juice and shake until dissolved. Add Pomegranate Concentrate and Vodka.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Champagne Cocktail

Sometimes it’s nice to get away from cocktails involving liquor.

The Champagne Cocktail is a very nice aperitif cocktail which involves no liquor at all.

Champagne Cocktail
Put into a wine glass one lump of Sugar, and saturate it with Angostura Bitters. Having added to this 1 lump of Ice, fill the glass with Champagne, squeeze on top a piece of lemon peel, and serve with a slice of orange.

The other nice thing about the Champagne Cocktail, is it doesn’t really need a super fancy sparkling wine to be good. Any half way decent bottle will work.

Some other decent not too expensive options, include sparkling wine from regions of France other than Champagne. These are usually called something like “Cremant de blah”, where the “blah” is the region they come from. I’ve had some really nice ones from Alsace and Bourgogne. Usually these will run in the neighborhood of $10-$15 US, and taste like Champagnes or American Sparkling wines at twice or three times the price. In my case, I used a wine called, “Cremant de Limoux, J. Laurens Brut” I found at my local grocery store. It is an amazingly good dry style, sparkling wine for around $10.

If you want the cocktail to be a good appetizer or before dinner drink, stay away from anything too sweet or fruity. Even though they are also cheap, Italian sparklers with the word “Asti” in the name would probably be a bad choice, unless you are serving the cocktail for dessert. Proseccos from Italy and Cavas from Spain are also also cheap, dry and good. Though, I’ve run into a few stinkers when trying to save money by shopping in those categories.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Abbey Cocktail

Inspired by my friend who is attempting to cook his way through “The Joy of Cooking” from begining to end, I thought I might try the same with a cocktail book in the hopes of gaining a larger perspective into the world of cocktails.

“The Savoy Cocktail Book” was one of the first major Cocktail books published in the 30s, so it has always been a go to book for me. It represents a link between the old world of 19th century cocktails and the new world of 20th Century cocktails.

I’ll try to make as many as I reasonably can with what ingredients are currently available and post pictures.

I will work on my velvet light box, I promise.

Abbey Cocktail.

Abbey Cocktail.

First up is “The Abbey“.

1/2 dry gin (1/5 oz. Beefeater’s Gin)
1/4 Lillet (3/4 oz.)
1/4 orange juice (3/4 oz.)
dash Angostura Bitters

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

I really like the translucent orange color of the cocktail. It almost seems to glow from within. Flavor is light, orangey and a little bit bitter. Like other Lillet based cocktails I’ve had in the past, I don’t seem to notice that I’m drinking spirits. Something about Lillet seems to transform gin into spring water. Could be dangerous.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.