Reverse Stagghattan

Towards the end of the night Monday, one of our regular guests came in.

I made him a few drinks from the list or related.

We were past close, he was the only person at the bar, but he wanted a finishing drink that was unique or interesting. I just wanted him to close out his tab, so I could count the drawer.

Being the perverse cuss that I am, I started from the Jerry Thomas Manhattan and extrapolated to the Brooklyn.

Reverse Brooklyn (or Reverse Stagghattan?)

1 oz 2013 George T. Stagg Barrel Proof
2 oz Cocchi Vermouth de Torino
2 Dash Luxardo Maraschino
1/4 oz Bigallet China China

Stir, strain. No garnish. It’s too late for that. All my tools are in the dish pit, I’ve already tossed all my peels, and moved the fruit back to storage.

I charged only $11, as he is a good customer. I am not sure what the price actually should be on this, $20? $30?

In any case, he thought it was maybe the best drink that he had had in any bar in a couple months.

Unlike the Staggerac, it WAS actually a good cocktail, and freaking delicious.

Watermelon Coolers

Mrs Flannestad’s sister is visiting and the two of them challenged me to make a before dinner cocktail. I’d been craving watermelon, so my first thought was watermelon, Tequila, and Mezcal. But I knew Mrs Flannestad wouldn’t be super happy with that. Next I thought Miller’s Gin, with its cucumber, would be an interesting combination with its relative watermelon. Warm day, so a long drink seemed appropriate, and a little spice never hurt anyone.

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Watermelon Cooler

1/2 Cup Watermelon, Peeled and cubed
1/2 oz Rich Simple Syrup
Small Pinch Cayenne
Small Pinch Salt
1 1/2 oz Miller’s Gin
Juice 1/2 Lime
1/2 oz Seltzer Water
Watermelon spear, for garnish

METHOD: Place watermelon in shaker with Simple Syrup, Cayenne, and Salt. Muddle. Add lime juice and Gin. Shake with ice and fine strain over fresh ice and seltzer in a Collins Glass. Garnish with Watermelon spear and serve with a straw.

Low Gap Old-Fashioned

Old-Fashioned.

06-04-2011, Low Gap Whiskey Old-Fashioned with Miracle Mile Forbidden Bitters.

2 oz Low Gap Clear Whiskey
1 tsp Caster Sugar
1 tsp Water
3 dash Miracle Mile Forbidden Bitters
Lemon Peel

Add sugar, water and bitters to the bottom of a heavy glass. Muddle until sugar is dissolved. Add cracked ice and pour in whiskey. Stir until well chilled. Squeeze lemon peel over glass and drop in.

A friend sent me this sample from a line of bitters he is working on, the Forbidden Bitters are designed to be an Old Fashioned style bitters in the vicinity of Abbott’s Bitters.

Well, what better to do with Old Fashioned style bitters than make an Old-Fashioned?

And a delicious Old-Fashioned it is!

Clayton’s Temperence Cocktail


Clayton’s Temperance Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
3/4 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a glass and top with chilled soda water.)

Not that interesting, just kind of tastes like too sweet lemony cola. Some lime juice (and a splash of High West Rendezvous Rye) rendered it somewhat more palatable. Still, the Pussyfoot was definitely the better cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail

Well, the first section after the 700 and some odd “Cocktails” is, drumroll…

Non-Alcoholic Cocktails

Actually, I wish there were some more exciting cocktails here, but most seem to have been cribbed from a “Clayton’s Kola Tonic” brochure.

“Claytons. The drink you have when you’re not having a drink.”

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
1/4 Orange Juice. (Blood Orange Juice)
1/2 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a short glass and top with chilled soda water.)

These sorts of cocktails, with my really intense and sweet Sirop-de-Citron, I just find to be too concentrated in flavor to be served as “up” cocktails. I much prefer them built with soda water instead, even over ice.

The Clayton’s Pussyfoot is actually darn tasty. I might, or might not, recommend slipping a splash of Rye Whiskey in there, just to juice it up, but certainly, not very much, especially with that name.

Hey, check out the new Schott-Zwiesel glassware. It’s from the Schumann Basic Bar collection. I really like these little glasses. Perfect size for a 19th Century highball or a glass of vermouth while making dinner. They really remind me of some of the vintage highball glassware I’ve seen. Also, they were on sale, so cool!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Balthazar Cocktail

I’ve been making this cocktail for a while when cocktail geeky or bartender type people ask me for a Mezcal, Tequila, or Agave “Dealer’s Choice Cocktail”.  It’s just kind of fun to mess with people and not make a shaken citrus or fruit based cocktail.  For obvious reasons, I usually just call it a “Death and Company” or “Phil Ward” style cocktail.  However, checking with one of the bartenders at Death and Co, it turns out it isn’t actually a Death and Company cocktail.  Damn.  That meant I had to think of a name.

A guest the other night quite enjoyed it and suggested calling it the “Balthazar Cocktail”.  Odd.  The Donkey or the Getty?  The Burro or the Ass?  I didn’t ask, so I leave it up to you to make the call.

Balthazar Cocktail
1 1/2 oz El Tesoro platinum tequila
1/4 oz Benesin Mezcal
1/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse Liqueur
3/4 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth
dash orange bitters

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass.  Squeeze orange peel over glass and discard.

Poker Cocktail

Poker Cocktail

Poker Cocktail.
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Havana Club 7 Year)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I decided to not gamble too much with the Poker Cocktail and upped the ante with Punt e Mes and an aged rum.

While I wouldn’t call this exactly a royal flush or four of a kind, it certainly beats a pair of deuces, hands down.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Golden Gate Cocktail

The Golden Gate Cocktail

3/4 Orange Ice. (2 scoops Ciao Bella Blood Orange Sorbet)
1/4 Gin. (1 oz No. 209 Gin)

Place in shaker and shake ~~ no ice.

Talk about drinking your dessert or adult candy!

Totally the proto slushy margarita here!

Perhaps because my sorbet was a bit cold, it was tough to get the pieces of sorbet to break up just by shaking. Probably get better results by buzzing this with a stick blender or malt mixer.

As a San Franciscan, I have to say I’m a bit disappointed that this kiddy cocktail seems to be named after our most impressive bridge. Still, with a decent sorbet, it’s a tasty and non-painful way to get your “Vitamin G”, as Herb Caen would put it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gin Cocktail

Gin Cocktail

4 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 tsp. Amaro CioCiara, dash Regan’s Orange)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Mystery Gin, 1/2 oz Beefeater’s Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Orange twist.)

I figured with 4 whole dashes of orange bitters here, it might be fun to use the Amer Picon-like CioCiara instead of regular orange bitters.

I found a small mystery bottle of something in my cabinet. Smells like gin. In fact, I suspect it might very well have been a sample of Hayman’s Old-Tom.

In any case, it seemed like it would be interesting in this cocktail, even though it is probably not a “Dry Gin,” and I didn’t have enough to make a whole 2 ounces.

Another cocktail needing a good long stir…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Duke of Marlborough Cocktail

Duke of Marlborough Cocktail

1/2 Sherry. (Fino)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Punt e Mes)
3 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Dash or two of Fee’s, Dash or two of Regan’s)

Stir well and twist orange peel on top.

Cheating slightly here by using Punt e Mes instead of regular Sweet Vermouth and as always making the vermouth cocktails on cracked ice instead of up.

I guess the question is, which of the 10 (at the time) Dukes of Marlborough this was named after. It appears likely that they were a Spencer, Churchill, or Spencer-Churchill. The seventh, John Winston Spencer-Churchill, 1822–1883, was the paternal Grandfather of Sir Winston Churchill.

With Punt e Mes, this is quite tasty. Almost Americano-like. Still, I wouldn’t blame you if you chose to add an ounce or so of Gin. I have no doubt that Sir Winston would. Though, now that I think about it, he might just glance at the bottles of Sherry and Vermouth, shrug, and pour himself a big glass of plain gin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.