Chocolate Cocktail (No 2)

Chocolate Cocktail (No 2)

Chocolate Cocktail (No. 2)

The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg
1/4 Yellow Chartruese (1/2 oz Yellow Chartruese)
3/4 Port Wine (1 1/2 oz Warre’s Warrior Port)
Teaspoonful of Crushed Chocolate (heaping teaspoon of Scharffen Berger cocoa powder)

Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Yes, well, again, I am not sure what might be meant by “crushed chocolate”. I couldn’t imagine how crushing a chocolate bar would result in anything except a mess.

Extra equipment: 2 small bowls, rubber spatula, and a whisk or fork.

Alternative instructions:

Dump a generous teaspoon of unsweetened Cocoa Power into one of your bowls. Add a teaspoon of water and mix until it starts to form a paste. Add a little more water at a time and continue mixing until it reaches the consistency of melted chocolate. Separate the white from the egg and whisk the yolk into the chocolate. Measure the liqueurs into your mixing tin or glass. Pour in the egg and chocolate mixture. Add ice and shake well. Strain into cocktail glass.

While I enjoyed the Chocolate Cocktail (No 1) and I know port and chocolate are supposed to go together, this reminded me of that old reese’s peanut butter cup commercial: “Excuse me, you got Port in my Chocolate. Why, no sir, you got chocolate in my Port.”

Unfortunately, they don’t really seem like, “two great tastes that taste great together,” at least in a cocktail. I dunno, maybe white or tawny port would work better.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chocolate Cocktail (No 1)

Chocolate Cocktail (No 1)

Chocolate Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Teaspoonful of Powdered Chocolate (heaping teaspoon of Scharffen Berger cocoa powder)
1 Egg
1 Liqueur Glass Maraschino (1 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Liqueur Glass Yellow Chartreuse (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
(dash Pierre Ferrand Cognac)

Shake well and strain into large glass.

Now, I’m not sure if “Chocolate Powder” means something other than cocoa powder; but, if you’re going to use Cocoa Powder, it’s going to be a bit more complicated than the above instructions, unless you want a lumpy mess.

Extra equipment: 2 small bowls, rubber spatula, and a whisk or fork.

(Method: Dump a generous teaspoon of unsweetened Cocoa Power into one of your bowls. Add a teaspoon of water and mix until it starts to form a paste. Add a little more water at a time and continue mixing until it reaches the consistency of melted chocolate. Whisk up your egg in the other bowl and pour it into chocolate. Whisk together. Measure the liqueurs into your mixing tin or glass. Pour in the egg and chocolate mixture. Add ice and shake well. Strain into cocktail glass.)

Like the Cafe Kirsch Cocktail, I had no real hope that I would enjoy this. And like the Cafe Kirsch, I found it a really tasty cocktail. The Yellow Chartreuse and Maraschino combine in really interesting ways with the cocoa. Mrs. Underhill even enjoyed it.

The two ounces of liqueur might seemed like a lot. However, using unsweetened cocoa powder, that’s about what you’re going to need to balance the bitterness of the chocolate. It seemed on par or less sweet than most hot cocoa or cold chocolate drinks.

If you have a choc-a-holic friend, this might be a nice change for them from the usual “chocotini”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.