Ostend Fizz

Ostend Fizz
1/2 Liqueur Glass Crème de Cassis. (3/4 oz Brizard Cassis de Bourdeaux)
1/2 Liqueur Glass Kirsch. (3/4 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
(Dash Meyer Lemon Juice)
Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

The in the previous reference to “Ostend” was in a quote regarding the Vanderbilt Cocktail, “This drink was first made at the Kursaal in Ostend during a visit of Colonel Cornelius Vanderbilt, the American Millionaire…”

Kursaal Ostend

“Before World War II, Ostend was a highly frequented gambling resort for the upper-class British citizens, especially since Queen Victoria prohibited gambling in the ´20s. The gambling law was applied throughout the entire Kingdom, making it impossible for the British people to enjoy gambling in England or in any colonial territory serving under Union Jack. However, the Queen’s law never applied to Belgium, something that made the Kursaal Casino a very popular destination for the U.K. gamblers during the roaring twenties.”

A gambler’s fizz, I guess, definitely French-ish, with its Kirsch and Cassis and definitely upscale. Kirsch, after all, has always been an expensive spirit, at least the good stuff.

This isn’t bad, a tad Cherry soda-ish, certainly less interesting than a Singapore or Straits Sling. Even though I couldn’t resist a touch of citrus, you see people ordering Cassis and Soda in French movies all the time. I guess they didn’t mind the sweetness. To me, a Fizz just isn’t a Fizz without a little citrus.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Stars and Stripes Cocktail

Stars and Stripes
1/3 Crème de Cassis. (1/2 oz Brizard Cassis)
1/3 Maraschino. (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Green Chartreuse. (1/2 oz Green Chartreuse)
Use liqueur glass and pour carefully so that ingredients do not mix.

My favorite Chartreuse story happened one Savoy Night at Alembic.

A few New York bartenders were in town and stopped by to celebrate the birthday of a local bartender. One of the gentlemen who stopped by was Mr. Toby Maloney. Mr. Maloney took it as his prerogative to attempt to drink us out of Cynar, one glass at a time. However, later in the evening, as he was talking to a young lady at the end of the bar, he discovered she had not, thus far in her life, experienced the joys of Green Chartreuse. A situation he felt should be rectified immediately. I grabbed the bottle of Chartreuse from the back bar and poured the young lady a shot. When I brought it over, Toby gave me a look and asked where our shots were, because surely a lady should not drink alone. Goddamn! While I agree young women should not drink alone, I was going to have to drink a shot of 110 proof Green Chartreuse! Back to the backbar, grab the chartreuse, pour two more shots. As I was bringing the shots of Chartreuse back to Toby, Daniel Hyatt noticed and asked me what we were drinking. I handed him a glass, he took a sniff, growled, “Psychopaths!” and handed back the glass. We did run out of Cynar before the night’s end.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Byrrh Cassis Cocktail

Byrrh Cassis Cocktail

Byrrh Cassis

1 Glass Byrrh (2 oz Byrrh 1875 Rare Assemblage)
1/2 Glass Creme de Cassis (1 oz Brizard Cassis de Bordeaux)

Use medium size glass and fill up with soda water. (Garnish with lemon peel.)

Sorry for the bad picture! I took several, they all looked OK on the back of the camera. Sadly, this one was the best, when examined on the computer.

Kind of sweet; but, perfectly tasty, if you like flavors like Cassis.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Broadway Smile Cocktail

Broadway Smile Cocktail

1/3 Creme de Cassis (Brizard Cassis de Bourdeaux)
1/3 Swedish Punch (Facile Swedish Punch)
1/3 Cointreau

Use liqueur glass and pour carefully so that ingredients do not mix.

Of the layered liqueur cocktails I’ve tried so far, I have to say this is my favorite. Unfortunately, it involves an ingredient you’re going to need to make yourself, Swedish Punch.

The Facile Swedish Punsch arrived to me via the kindness of internet acquaintances.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.