Up-To-Date Cocktail

Up-To-Date Cocktail
2 Dashes Grand Marnier. (5ml or 1 tsp. Grand Marnier)
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters. (2 dashes Angostura Bitters)
1/2 Sherry. (1 oz Solear Manzanilla Sherry)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz 40 Creek 3 Grain Canadian Whisky)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Hey, this cocktail from Hugo Ensslin’s 1917 cocktail book “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” is pretty darn tasty.

I was afraid it would be a little plain, or that the sherry would get overwhelmed, but it is quite nice, with both the whisky and sherry showing nicely.

With computers, it is always important to keep up-to-date, so it goes with cocktails.

Gotta keep up with what the kids are up to. Heck, sherry is even a trendy ingredient again, you could make this fairly mild whisky cocktail and still seem up to date.

Plus, one of the very few cocktails, outside of the Cadillac Margarita, which gives you a justified reason to use Grand Marnier. If you can’t find decent Canadian Whisky, use Rye. You’ll thank me later.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

T.N.T. Cocktail

T.N.T. Cocktail
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Forty Creek Three Grain)
1/2 Absinthe. (1 oz Kubler Absinthe)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In name and spirit, an appropriate cocktail for the day the California Supreme Court ruled California Proposition 8 unconstitutional.

However, not really a very good cocktail, I’m sorry to say. I guess I would say it is nominally better than the Earthquake (aka Bunny Hug), just because it doesn’t have Gin. On the other hand, any cocktail that is half Absinthe is definitely a questionable cocktail.

Since this cocktail is another from Judge Jr.’s Prohibition era recipe book, “Here’s How”, it does beg the question exactly what sort of Absinthe would possibly have been served during Prohibition. Quite possibly it wouldn’t be entirely inappropriate to use “Steep-Sinthe” or “Bohemian” Style Absinthe in this one…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sharky Punch Cocktail

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Sharky Punch Cocktail
1 teaspoonful Syrup (1 Teaspoon Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup)
1/4 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek 3 Grain Whisky)
3/4 Calvados or Apple Brandy. (Calvados Roger Groult Reserve)
Shake well and strain in into medium size glass… (Garnished with thin ginger slice and thick slice lemon peel.) …and fill with (well chilled!) soda water.

Whiskey, Apple Brandy, and Gum with soda seemed a tad plain, so I juiced it up a bit with the garnish. Sorry if that upsets you, but I’m the one who has to drink these things.

Shakey Punch reminds me of a lovely Laurie Anderson song narrated by the late William S. Burroughs, “Sharkey’s Night”.

Well, in the case above, Laurie is narrating with a pitch changer on her voice, not quite the same as the album track. Still pretty cool.
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Sharky Punch is not bad, either. I mean, it isn’t anything fancy, just a Calvados high ball stretched out a bit with Canadian Whisky. Enjoyable enough. Definitely seems prohibition era, though, with the combination of spirits. No idea on the name. Maybe a bar or person?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Scoff-law Cocktail

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Scoff-Law Cocktail.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 Dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (3/4 oz 40 Creek Three Grains)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/6 lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 Grenadine. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

For what it is worth, Harry McElhone’s Barflies and Cocktails calls for Rye, instead of the Savoy “Canadian Club”.  Even though, in deference to Mr. Craddock, I went with Canadian Whisky, generally, I agree with Mr. McElhone in these matters.

While researching the Scoff-Law, I turned up the following from the Chicago Tribune, January 27th, 1924: “Hardly has Boston added to the Gaiety of Nations by adding to Webster’s Dictionary the opprobrious term of “scoff-law” to indicate the chap who indicts the bootlegger, when Paris comes back with a “wet answer”—Jock, the genial bartender of Harry’s New York Bar, yesterday invented the Scoff-law Cocktail, and it has already become exceedingly popular among American prohibition dodgers.”

Made to the Savoy recipe, this is a pleasant, light, tart, easy drinking libation.  Many modern sources bump up the booze a bit more and often leave out the orange bitters.  I kind of like it the way it is, with the sweet/tart balance not dissimilar to a red wine.

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This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (Alberta Premium 25 Year)

Sazerac Cocktail 20 out of 28.

I have challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me. Hopefully, if I can get my act together we’ll have some video.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar. (5ml Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters. (a couple dashes Peychaud’s Bitters)
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Alberta Premium 25 Year Canadian Rye Whisky)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled and rinsed with Absinthe (Sirene Absinthe Verte) and squeeze lemon peel on top.

As Canadian Club is given as an option, I suppose I have to make at least one Sazerac with Canadian Whisky.

While due to some bizarre relic of prohibition slang Canadian Whisky is sometimes referred to as “Rye”, very little Canadian Whisky actually contains enough Rye to be considered a “Rye Whiskey” by American legal standards. Most of what I’ve read suggests that the blend of grains is closer to American Bourbon. Mostly corn, with some Barley and a little Rye. But the method of manufacture is closer to that of Blended Scotch Whiskey than it is to American Bourbon. Portions of strongly flavored whiskies are blended together with other more highly distilled whiskies, resulting in a milder, less rough, easy drinking spirit. The resulting Whisky Blend can also be colored with caramel coloring and/or flavored with certain allowed agents.

Some of these Canadian Whiskies are good, and some just are not. The worst taste immediately and apparently of highly distilled alcohol and the flavor chemist’s laboratory.

My favorites so far are the 40 Creek Whiskies and this Alberta Premium 25 Year. Interestingly, the Alberta Whiskies (Alberta Premium, Alberta Springs, and Alberta Premium 25 Year) are some of the few Whiskies in the world made from 100% Rye distillate. However, they are all still blended whiskies.

Is this any good?

Damn straight, it is! While not as rough and tumble as most American Rye, this Canadian Whiskey is a fine, fine product, if a bit delicately flavored. I’d advise you, should you be lucky enough to have a bottle, to go easy on the sweeteners, bitters, and Absinthe, allowing what character the Whiskey brings to the party to come to the fore.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lawhill Cocktail

Lawhill Cocktail

Lawhill Cocktail

1 Dash Absinthe. (1/3 tsp. Marteau Verte Classique)
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/4 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select, 1/4 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

I liked this a lot, but I can say with confidence that I would have liked it even more with Sweet Vermouth instead of dry. Even just a dash of Sweet Vermouth. Of course, then it would just be an old-school Canadian Whisky Manhattan.

I’m told that Scotsman Harry McElhone published this cocktail in one of his early books. Law is apparently Scots for “Hill”. The Law in Dundee Scotland is sometimes called “Law Hill” even though that actually means, “Hill Hill.”

At a height of over 500 feet above sea level, Dundee Law provides a popular, easily accessed vantage point placed high above the centre of Dundee, Scotland’s fourth largest city.  This long-since extinct volcano is featured on the local Dundee City Council logo (below) and its great height dominates the surrounding area, and can be seen from very many miles away. There is a viewpoint where visitors can scan the view and be informed of the many worthwhile scenes to be had, from the Grampian Mountains to the North and as far as the Southern Uplands of Lothian, south of Edinburgh.  Across the Firth of Tay can be seen the ‘Kingdom’ of Fife, travelling north across the Tay Road Bridge from where, the Law can be seen in full majesty. The famous Tay Rail Bridge can also be seen curving its way across the River Tay taking trains to Edinburgh and London.  Numerous other landmarks can be seen.

Also, there was a well known ship called the “Lawhill“.

Lawhill was built at the Caledon Shipbuilding & Engineering Company yard of W. B. Thompson in Dundee, Scotland, and launched on 24 August 1892. Named after the Law, a hill in the middle of Dundee, Lawhill had been ordered by shipowner Charles Barrie for the jute trade, but only made two voyages carrying jute before the business became unprofitable, and shifted to other cargoes.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ladies’ Cocktail

Ladies' Cocktail

Ladies’ Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 tsp. Sirene Absinthe Verte)
2 Dashes Anisette. (2/3 tsp. Anis del Mono dulce)
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
1 Glass of Canadian Club Whisky. (1 3/4 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select, 1/4 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)

Stir well and put small piece of pineapple (1/4 orange slice) in glass.

Chuckle, I’d like to meet the Ladies who drink cocktails like this!

I am reminded of a recent episode at a bar.

At a bar near where I work, which is a kind of divey beer and whiskey kind of place, I decided to experiment and ask for a cocktail. “Manhattan, no cherry.” Bartender gave me a look and went off to mix the cocktail. When he brought it back, he looked around and asked, “Is there someone with you? Did you want something else?” The implication being that the Manhattan had certainly to be for a girl that was accompanying me, and he expected me to order a proper man’s drink like beer, whiskey, or whiskey rocks. I made a mental note and sipped my girly cocktail.

Anyway, the Ladies’ Cocktail, effeminate or not, is quite tasty. Pretty similar to a Sazerac. If I weren’t Savoy Stomping, I would make it with Rye Whiskey and be done with it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fox River Cocktail

Fox River Cocktail

4 Dashes Peach Bitters. (1 tsp Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1 Lump of ice.
1/4 Crème de Cacao. (1/2 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
3/4 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select)

Use wineglass and squeeze lemon peel on top.

Hmmm…

Looking at this now, it seems like it should be built, old fashioned style, rather than stirred with ice and strained into a glass as I did.

All the same, I was OK with everything here except the lemon twist. I just didn’t like how the lemon combined with the chocolate, peach, and whiskey.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Capetown Cocktail

Capetown Cocktail

Capetown Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
3 Dashes Curacao (Senior Curacao of Curacao)
1/2 Caperitif (1 1/2 oz Dubonnet Blanc)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Lemon peel on top.

Initially the flavor of the Dubonnet seemed a bit strong. Grew on me though, and as I drank it I started to appreciate the interplay of the Dubonnet, bitters, curacao and lemon. By the time I finished, I was ready for another. Hallmark of a fine cocktail, I believe.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Canadian Whisky Cocktail

Canadian Whisky Cocktail

Canadian Whisky Cocktail

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
2 Teaspoonful Gomme Syrup (2 teaspoons Depaz Cane Syrup)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky (2 oz 40 creek Barrel Select)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel on top.)

I know, I know, this is the same as any other “name_the_spirit cocktail”.

What can I say, I like them. Pretty much all of them.

The funny thing is, this will taste different every time you make it, even if you use the exact same ingredients.

Maybe it’s partly a mood thing, or maybe one day you give it an extra shake of bitters, or a little more whisk(e)y, or a little less sugar.

It’s probably different if you’re a bartender, and can whip these out exactly the same, cocktail after cocktail; but, at home, sometimes the simplest cocktails can be the most interesting.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.