Zazarac Cocktail

Wow, this cocktail, and one more and a major portion of this project completed.

Oh, wait, I will have to change the footer, if I am going to continue on after the Zed…

Zazarac Cocktail
1/6 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Barbancourt 8 Year)
1/6 Anisette. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/6 Gomme Syrup. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Mesquite Bean Syrup)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1/3 oz Rittenhouse Bonded)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Bitters)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)
3 Dashes Absinthe. (3 dash Absinthe)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Out of Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup, so instead substituting Mesquite Bean Syrup, which is made by extracting the juice from the mesquite bean pods that grow abundantly in the deserts of the southwestern United States.

As usual, in cocktails sourced from Harry McElhone’s 1928 “ABC of Cocktails”, that Harry Calls for Rye Whiskey instead of the Savoy Cocktail Book’s Canadian Club.

Such a long ingredient list, you just sort of wonder what was going on in the head of the person who threw all this together. Had they had a Sazerac many years ago and were attempting to recreate the flavor with ingredients they had at hand?

There is an interesting and somewhat unexpected spiciness, reminiscent of fruitcake. Still, there is no way this is anything other than way too sweet, even well stirred.

Spatchcock that chicken.

Really, I just like to say, “Spatchcock”. It’s probably a character flaw.

But it really is an awesome way to flatten out a chicken and roast it evenly. Works for Turkeys too!

The Roast Chicken with bread salad from Zuni Cafe, no matter how literally you take Judy Rodgers’ crazily detailed instructions, is a truly awesome presentation. One of the best dishes from that generation of chefs. Roast a chicken. Then deglaze your pan with wine and a little vinegar. Adjust seasonings. Fill a bowl with bitter greens, like Arugula, add some freshly toasted croutons. Pour the warm dressing over the greens and croutons and toss to combine. Serve your roast chicken pieces on top. So tasty!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Temptation Cocktail

Temptation Cocktail
1 Piece Orange Peel.
1 Piece Lemon Peel.
2 Dashes Dubonnet. (5ml/1tsp Dubonnet Rouge)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (5ml/1tsp Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe Superior)
2 Dashes Curacao. (5ml/1tsp Brizard Curacao)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Forty Creek 3 Grains Canadian Whisky)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Very similar to the Dandy Cocktail, (and with a similar method to the Newbury,) I do wonder where these cocktails which use citrus peels as an ingredient come from, as we have not yet identified a cocktail book as a source.

Interestingly, there’s a quote from the Hon. Wm (Cocktail) Boothby, Premier Mixologist, that addresses  this very issue:

Some of my recipes for the manufacture of cocktails order the dispenser to twist a piece of lemon peel into the glass in which the drink is to be served; in some establishments this is forbidden, the bartenders being ordered to twist and drop the peel into the mixing glass and strain the peel with the ice when putting the ice when  putting the drink into the mixing glass.  This is merely a matter of form, however, as the flavor is the same in both cases.

So it appears that in the cases of some establishments, rather than serving the peels in the drinks, they would be stirred in.

I don’t exactly agree with Boothby that the end result is the same. Stirring with the peel in the drink primarily flavors the drink with citrus oils, while squeezing over the cocktail accents the smell. I suppose for the best of both world’s you would stir with the peel in the drink, then squeeze over the finished cocktail, and discard. Whew! A lot of work!

A very tasty cocktail, the Temptation is one, like the Dandy, I feel could use a bit of a revival, certainly among those customers who like their cocktails Brown, Bitter, and Stirred. Well, unless they hate Absinthe/Anise, in which case, it might be best to stick with the Dandy.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Swazi Freeze Cocktail

Swazi Freeze Cocktail
1 Dash Peach Brandy. (5ml/1tsp Massenez Creme de Peche de la Vigne)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (3/4 oz 40 Creek 3 Grain)
2/3 Caperitif (5ml/1tsp Amaro Montenegro, 1 1/2 oz Dolin Blanc)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

For the Caperitif my current favorite substitution remains Blanc/Bianco Vermouth with a dash of Amaro Montenegro.

Accurate or not, this substitution is really tasty in the Swazi Freeze Cocktail, in fact the Swazi Freeze is just about the best use of 40 Creek 3 Grain I’ve found so far.  Also one of the most enjoyable Savoy cocktails I’ve made in the while. I suppose, not dissimilar to one of my favorite modern cocktails, Julie Reiner’s Slope Cocktail.

As usual, cocktails with weird names and Caperitif in the ingredient list are related to South, or in this case Southern, Africa.

For more information about Swazis and Swaziland:

The Swaziland National Trust Website

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 2)

Soul Kiss Cocktail (No. 2)

1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Thomas Handy Rye Whiskey)
1 Slice of Orange.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Uh, oops, it appears I misremembered the type of vermouth in this cocktail while making it and didn’t notice until now.

Shoot, I blame the lovely, funky, music from Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings, along with a strange tendency to make Rye Whiskey Cocktails which call for Dry Vermouth with Sweet Vermouth.

I have the same problem with the Brooklyn. Every time I think about making it, I try to remember, this cocktail is made with Dry Vermouth. But then every time I make it, somehow Sweet Vermouth ends up in the mixing glass. It’s just weird. Then I make a Brooklyn correctly, and think, yep, you know, I prefer this with Sweet Vermouth. Just like the Old Pal vs. the Boulevardier.

I will note that, as with most cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book calling for “Canadian Club”, the source recipe for this cocktail, “Harry’s ABC,” calls for Rye Whiskey, not Canadian. And I think that is the correct choice.

This was a rather popular drink among those who tried it. “Tastes like a Manhattan,” was one comment, and they asked for the recipe. I really liked it, as well. It is a kind of fruity, but not too fruity, Manhattan.

Anecdote: Last Savoy night, one of the servers ordered a “Soul Kiss Cocktail” without specifying 1 or 2. Tim asked me which to make. I said, “No 2 has Rye Whiskey, that’s the one I would make. In fact, I would go so far as to call that a defining philosophy. If it has whiskey, it is the right choice.” He agreed.

Most importantly, should you order this cocktail during the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, May 23rd, 2010? Well, damn. If you order it from me, there’s still a fighting chance that I will again have a brain fart and make it with Italian Vermouth instead of Dry Vermouth. Probably one of the more competent Alembic bartenders will make it “correctly”. You might have to take your chances with this one. Pretty sure it is a good cocktail either way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Russell House Cocktail

004

Russell House Cocktail.
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Syrup. (1/2 bar spoon Rich Simple Syrup)
3 Dashes Blackberry Brandy. (1 bar spoon Leopold Bros. Mountain Blackberry Liqueur)
1 glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Wiser’s Very Old)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

About a million years ago, someone told me that they thought Wiser’s Very Old was a pretty good substitution for pre-prohibition or prohibition era Canadian Whiskey.

Well, I don’t know, not having tasted vintage Canadian Whiskey, but this is a pretty unappealing cocktail and Wiser’s Very Old is a not very appealing Whiskey. And for gosh sakes, it’s just a Whiskey cocktail with a dash of Raspberry Liqueur! Like the Palmer Cocktail before it, this has no business being as bad as it is.

A bunch of people gave me a hard time about using 40 Creek Barrel Select and the Alberta Springs Whiskies, but boy, I just don’t know. Those two are just about the only Canadian Whiskies I’ve tried and can even remotely enjoy on their own or in cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Palmer Cocktail

Palmer Cocktail

Palmer Cocktail.

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Canadian Mist 1885 Special Reserve)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Even without sugar, there really shouldn’t be anything wrong with this. So little Angostura and lemon. But man, does this construction just seem to point up the weaknesses of this whisky. Just dreadful stuff. Totally constructed and artificial tasting. Bleah.

I’m going back to the non-traditional Alberta Springs, if this is the general state of Canadian Whisky.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Opening Cocktail

Opening Cocktail

Opening Cocktail.

1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz Homemade Grenadine)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Alberta Premium Canadian Whisky)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again, this seemed a bit sweet without some bittering agent. Stretched the rules a bit and used Punt e Mes. It’s just about the only Sweet vermouth we use at Alembic. Blame Daniel Hyatt. He’s a bad influence.

Like the “One Exciting Night” I enjoyed this more than I expected, with the Punt e Mes providing enough contrast and bitterness to counter the sweetness of the homemade grenadine. Enjoyable flavors too. Though if making it for myself again, I’d probably use 1 1/2 oz whiskey, 3/4 oz Punt e Mes, and a barspoon of Grenadine.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

“Old Pal” Cocktail

"Old Pal" Cocktail

“Old Pal” Cocktail

1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Original Formula Dry)
1/3 Campari. (1 oz Campari)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This “Old Pal” comes from the 1922 edition of “Harry’s ABC of Cocktails”. As far as I can tell, it appears to be one of the earliest recipes in print, at least in English, calling for Campari.

It doesn’t quite make sense to me, however, with the French Vermouth and Rye. Really you just end up with very little balancing out the flavors of the Campari and Rye Whiskey.

By McElhone’s 1927 “Barflies and Cocktails“, the “Old Pal” had disappeared in favor of the Boulevardier*, aka the Bourbon Negroni. A much more sensible beverage, if you ask me.

*If you can’t find the Boulevardier initially, it’s no wonder. Check the “Cocktails Round Town” section at the back of the book. “Now is the time for all good Barflies to come to the aid of the party, since Erskinne Gwynne crashed in with his Boulevardier Cocktail: 1/3 Campari, 1/3 Italian Vermouth, 1/3 Bourbon Whisky.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

New 1920 Cocktail

New 1920 Cocktail

New 1920 Cocktail.

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Orange)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Alberta Premium Canadian Rye Whisky)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Alberta Premium

A while ago Darcy O’Neil, of The Art of Drink, and I did a trade, resulting in me being in possession of Alberta Premium Canadian Rye Whisky. It’s really tasty stuff.  It’s a 100% Rye Whiskey, but made in the Canadian style.  That is to say, much of the Rye is distilled to a very high proof, nearly vodka, and then blended with a more flavorful “character spirit” and aged.  In its smooth rye flavor, the Alberta Premium reminds me more of Irish Whiskey than other Canadian Whiskies or American Ryes.

So this is basically a perfect Canadian Whisky Manhattan with a dash of orange bitters. Who can complain about that?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Mountain Cocktail

Mountain Cocktail

Mountain Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg.
1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 French vermouth. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/6 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (Generous 1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)

(Dry shake ingredients with spring or blender ball for a half minute or so. Add ice and…) Shake well and strain into medium-size glass.

In “Barflies and Cocktails”, Harry McElhone has a slightly different take on the Mountain Cocktail: 1 white of a fresh egg; 1/6 Lemon Syrup; 1/6 French Vermouth; 1/3 Rye Whisky; 3 dashes of orange bitters.

McElhone also notes that the recipe is “from Hoffman House, New York.”

I guess it is part of Craddock’s weird compulsion to make “perfect” cocktails that leads him to use sweet and dry vermouth in the Mountain. Or maybe he found the cocktail too tart with only dry vermouth and nothing to balance against the lemon juice?

Anyway, it is a very strange cocktail.

The first flavors are all whiskey, the second flavors are the lemon juice, then in the finish the sweet vermouth and whiskey seemed to combine into flavors similar to coffee.

I didn’t exactly like it, but I kept going back, tasting it, and puzzling over the flavors.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.