Corpse Reviver (No. 1)

Corpse Reviver Cocktail (No. 1)

Corpse Reviver (No. 1)

1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Apple Brandy or Calvados. (3/4 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/2 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognac)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

To be taken before 11 a.m., or whenever steam and energy are needed.

Apparently “Corpse Revivers” were a class of pre-prohibition drinks meant to be taken as “hair of the dog”.

By the time we get to the 30s only about 3 or 4 recipes survived.

In the Savoy Cocktail Book we have Corpse Revivers No. 1 and No. 2.

In Duffy we have Corpse Revivers 1-3, with a slight variation in No. 2 which we’ll cover in the next entry.

In European cocktail collections you will find another cocktail called the Corpse Reviver No. 2 (or sometimes No. 3). This drink is credited to Frank Meier of the Ritz, Paris and is identical to Hemingway’s “Death in the Afternoon”. A shot of Absinthe topped up with champagne. I’ve tried that cocktail, and it definitely is a way to build up a head of steam. Not sure about it as a brunch cocktail, unless you do plan to die in the afternoon.

The Corpse Reviver No. 1 is a perfectly fine and enjoyable cocktail. I did find it significantly improved with the addition of a drop or two of Angostura Bitters.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

C.F.H. Cocktail

C.F.H. Cocktail

C.F.H. Cocktail

1/6 Grenadine (1/2 oz homemade)
1/6 Cederlund’s Swedish Punch (1/2 oz Facile Swedish Punch)
1/6 Calvados (1/2 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy)
1/6 Lemon Juice (1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)
1/3 Burrough’s Beefeater Gin (1 oz Boodle’s Gin)

(Shake and strain into cocktail glass)

Oddly, this recipe has no method instructions and I couldn’t dig up anything on the name.

Anyway, it’s really quite tasty. A sort of more sophisticated Jack Rose.

Really enjoyed the interplay of the spice elements of the gin and Swedish Punsch with the Apple Brandy and Lemon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Calvados Cocktail Variation

Calvados Cocktail Special

Calvados Cocktail

Variation of the above.

3 Glasses Calvados (2 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy)
3 Glasses Sweetened Lemon Juice (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
(1 teaspoon Caster Sugar)

Shake very Thoroughly and serve.

Since this was just an Apple Brandy Sour, I didn’t feel quite justified in using the Germain-Robin Apple Brandy in it.

Perfectly tasty Apple Brandy Sour, and quite refreshing.

Dunno why it is called a “variation on the above” or why it isn’t named simply “Calvados Sour”.

Let me know why you think this interpretation might be incorrect.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Calvados Cocktail

Calvados Cocktail

Calvados Cocktail (6 People)

2 Glasses Calvados (1 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
2 Glasses Orange Juice (1 oz Orange Juice)
1 Glass Cointreau (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1 Glass Orange Bitters (1/2 oz Aperol)

Add plenty of ice and shake carefully

Turned this into a single serving drink.

Two main puzzles here.

First, I would expect something called “Calvados Cocktail” to be a Calvados Cocktail. That is to say, Calvados, sugar, bitters, and a twist. What the orange juice is doing here, I don’t know.

Second, “1 Glass Orange Bitters”? The only thing I can think is they might mean an aperitif bitters like the Dutch Hoppe Orange Bitters. The closest thing I could think of was Aperol.

The flavors are there and interesting; but, as written above, it’s too sweet for me.

Suggestions? Thoughts?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Block and Fall Cocktail

Block and Fall Cocktail

1/6 Anis del Oso or Absinthe (1/2 oz Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
1/6 Calvados (1/2 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/3 Brandy (1 oz Korbel VSPOP)
1/3 Cointreau (3/4 oz Cointreau)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Another Savoy sweet-and-deadly in the style of the Between the Sheets. This one raises the ante slightly over the BTS by tossing some 140 proof Absinthe into the pot.

When reading through cocktail books, the name of this cocktail has often caught my eye and I’ve wondered what it meant.

Turns out, “Block and Fall” is another name for the rope and pulley device more commonly called, (at least in the US,) a “Block and Tackle”. Well, a couple of these will certainly get you “hoisted”.

Also, I found a reference to Prohibition (US) era speakeasies called “Block and Fall Joints”. According to some, these were the sorts of places serving low quality, high proof booze. Patrons would stop by for a cocktail, leave, walk a “block,” and “fall” into the gutter.

It’s actually a complex and interesting cocktail, everything is there and cooperating. I did slightly reduce the amount of Cointreau called for.

Don’t drink too many, if you want to make it home safely!

Edit – Oops! Forgot to include the picture!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Bentley Cocktail

Bentley Cocktail

1/2 Calvados, or Apple Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

A fine, if unremarkable, cocktail. Found it a bit more interesting with the addition of orange peel and a dash of orange bitters.

Some drinky types have mentioned that the Dubonnet sold in the US is manufactured in Kentucky by Heaven Hill and may have a less interesting character than the Dubonnet manufactured in France. Not having had the opportunity to try the imported stuff I cannot confirm or deny this opinion.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Barton Special Cocktail

Barton Special Cocktail*

1/4 Calvados or Apple Brandy. (3/4 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/4 Scotch Whisky. (3/4 oz Compass Box Asyla)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (it would be proper to stir, but it really probably doesn’t matter) well and strain into cocktail glass.

*What has Bruce Barton got to do with this?

Bruce Barton was an inspirational writer, Christian, Republican, Politician, and Madison Avenue Adman. His most famous creation was Betty Crocker. He also worked on high profile ad campaigns for General Electric and General Motors. I’m guessing the above smart remark above was made before it was revealed he had had an affair with a female co-worker and she was blackmailing him. Instead of giving in to her demands, (a second time,) he turned her in to the police.

In any case, if Barton did enjoy a Barton Special now and then, he certainly didn’t like anything getting between booze and his stomach.

It is remotely possible that there might be some magical combination of brands of these spirits that might make this flavorful. But, uh, honestly, this is a big glass of cold, straight booze.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Apple Cocktail

Apple Cocktail
(6 People)
Take 2 glasses of sweet Cider (2 oz Martinelli’s Cider), 1 Glass Gin (1 oz. Beefeater’s), 1 Glass of Brandy (1 oz Korbel VSOP Brandy) and 2 glasses of Calvados (2 oz Laird’s Bonded Apple Jack). Shake and serve. (Garnish with thin horizontal slices of tart, green apple.)

Note: This is the cocktail doctors hate to recommend.

The above volume recommendations are for two cocktails. Be nice to go with a nice tart cider. Something with a little more spine than the Martinelli’s. If you have to use a mild apple juice style cider, a dash of lemon wouldn’t hurt. In any case, a tasty cocktail, and the apple slice was a nice addition which added a tasty booze soaked treat to the end of the cocktail.

Caution: Over enthusiastic consumption of this potent pomme potation may result in tawdry, if not downright original, sin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ante Cocktail

Ante Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/4 Hercules. (1/2 oz Spiced Dubonnet Rouge)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Calvados or Apple brandy. (1 oz Clear Creek Apple Brandy)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Building on the previous cocktail calling for “Hercules” I am again using the Spice infused Dubonnet Rouge for this one. I have to admit I like it rather more than the previous Angler Cocktail. The apple brandy, touch of extra sweetness and orange from the Cointreau in combination with the Absinthe style spices is really pretty nice. A fairly complex cocktail, for only containing 4 ingredients.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Angel Face Cocktail

Angel Face Cocktail

1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Softer Gin like Plymouth)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot liqueur)
1/3 Calvados. (3/4 oz AppleJack or Calvados)

Shake (stir please! ~Erik) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Gonna be a pretty different cocktail, depending on which apple spirit you choose. The Laird’s Bonded AppleJack is pretty good, but a little rougher than the French stuff, or the nicer American brands like Clear Creek or Germain-Robin.

I thought of the idea of the apple angel’s wings garnish on the way home and actually the flavor of the garnish and the cocktail complement each other nicely. The idea of trying to reproduce an angel’s face also occurred to me; but, then I could only think about the Rilke poem which sez, “every angel is terrifying,” and discarded the idea.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.