Roulette Cocktail

Roulette-2

Roulette Cocktail.
1/4 Swedish Punch. (1/2 oz Underhill-Lounge Homemade)
1/4 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz Montecristo White Rum)
1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Roger Groult Reserve Calvados)
Shake (I stirred) will and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, this is quite sweet. Still, it is kind of interesting as a vehicle for Calvados and Swedish Punch. It would not be a horrible after dinner drink. The Montecristo White seems to simply serve as filler here, not really contributing much, at least in the face of such strong flavors as the Calvados and Swedish Punch.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prince’s Smile Cocktail

Prince's Smile Cocktail

Prince’s Smile Cocktail.

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/4 Calvados or Apple Brandy. (1/2 oz Groult Calvados Reserve)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Lemon Peel.

I’ve always maintained the the North Shore Distiller’s No. 6 is a great foil for apricot and lemon flavors. It does not disappoint here.

The Prince’s Smile bit like the a cross between the Dolly O’Dare and the Between the Sheets cocktails.  As fond as I am of Apple Brandy, this might even be an improvement over either one of those two classics.

To counter the sweetness of the apricot liqueur, you might want to be a tad generous with that “dash” of lemon juice.

Note the swank new Japanese Yarai mixing glass, which I ordered from Cocktail Kingdom.  Still trying to exactly get a handle on this puppy.  It seems to have an incredible amount of thermal density, which resulted in some drinks being more dilute and less cold than I wanted.  At this point, I really recommend pre-chilling this Mixing glasses, or it is going to suck a lot of cold out of your cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Princess Mary’s Pride Cocktail

Princess Mary's Pride Cocktail

Princess Mary’s Pride Cocktail.
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet)
1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Groult Calvados Reserve)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Created by Harry Craddock on February 28, 1922, to mark the wedding celebrations of H.R.H Princess Mary.

Like the preceding Princess Mary, this was created to mark the wedding of H.R.H. Princess Mary. Nothing against Mr. McElhone’s cocktail, but this is about a zillion times better to me.

Being 2/3 aperitif wine, it is on the light side, but the flavorful Groult Calvados still pokes it’s head out, giving the drink a flavorful character.

Thoroughly enjoyable, this is one cocktail I suspect is better with Calvados than it would be with American Apple Brandy.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Personality a La Roy Cocktail

Personality a la Roy

Personality a La Roy Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/4 Hercules. (1/2 oz Underhill Hercules version 3)
1/4 Applejack or Calvados. (1/2 oz Calvados Groult Reserve)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake (I stirred) well as strain into cocktail glass.

Actually gotten pretty good response both to Underhill Hercules Version 3 and to this cocktail made with it. Not sure where to go from here. Expand the spice component? I think I could slightly enhance the bitter elements as long as I continue to skip Wormwood.

The name is a bit odd, but I have no idea who Roy might have been and what about his personality might have attracted the name of this cocktail?

Perhaps South African poet Roy Campbell? The time is about right for whatever fame he might have generated for himself in South Africa and England.

Here’s an amusing section from his wikipedia entry, circa 1930 or so:

Roy Campbell (poet)

“…moving in literary circles, he was initially on friendly terms with the Bloomsbury Group but then became very hostile to them; he declared that they were sexually promiscuous, snobbish, and anti-Christian. His wife’s lesbian affair with Vita Sackville-West, the lover of Virginia Woolf, was a contributing cause to his changed attitude.”

Oh Vita, with her long legs, wolfhounds, and gardens. Who could resist?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Oom Paul Cocktail

Oom Paul Cocktail

Oom Paul Cocktail.

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 Caperitif. (1 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth)
1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve struggled with various substitutions for “Caperitif” over the course of these cocktails, and I don’t know if it’s just that I really like Dolin Blanc, but it was a very interesting foil for the flavors of the Apple Brandy in this relatively simple cocktail.

Intrigued enough with the results, I remade it with Calvados Groult Reserve and enjoyed it even more. I’m not sure if I agree with one friend’s assertion that, “Calvados is always better,” but in this case it was definitely more interesting than the American Apple Brandy.

If you like Apple Brandies as much as I do, this is a great cocktail to become familiar with their character.

Another unusually named cocktail with Caperitif.  I should know by now that pretty much any cocktail with some weird ass name and Caperitif is going to have something to do with the Anglo Boer Wars.

From the Wikipedia entry for “Paul Kruger“:

Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger (10 October 1825 – 14 July 1904), better known as Paul Kruger and affectionately known as Oom Paul (Afrikaans: “Uncle Paul”) was State President of the South African Republic (Transvaal). He gained international renown as the face of Boer resistance against the British during the South African or Second Boer War (1899-1902).

More information here: “Who Was Paul Kruger

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Maiden’s Prayer Cocktail (No. 2)

Maiden's Prayer (No. 2)

Maiden’s Prayer Cocktail (No. 2*)

1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)
1/6 Calvados. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Groult Calvados Réserve 3 years old)
1/6 Pricota. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

*On the principle that if at first you don’t succeed, cry, cry again.

According to cocktaildb Pricota was, “Defunct but highly-respected proprietary brand of English apricot-flavored brandy liqueur. Produced by Humphrey Taylor & Co. of London in the late 18th and 19th centuries,” so we’ll use the highly respected R&W Orchard Apricot instead.

Again, even though it is a modern gin, I’ve previously found that the North Shore No. 6 works well with apricot flavors, so I’ve deployed it here.

My bottle of Cocchi Aperitivo Americano, though it has served me well, is nearing a state of tragic emptiness. Here’s hoping someone soon manages to convince the TTB to allow it back into the country.

I’ve found pleasure in the prayers of both of these Maidens and would be hard pressed to pick a favorite. The sweet-tart No. 1 or the bitter-sweet No. 2.

Both are well balanced, witty, and sophisticated young ladies, err… cocktails!

Chuckle, while I appreciate the bloom of sweet-tart youth, I guess I have come to a point in my life where some bitter-sweet experience is more appealing. In cocktails, that is. Right?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Kicker Cocktail

Kicker Cocktail

Kicker Cocktail

2 Dashes Italian Vermouth (1 teaspoon Carpano Antica)
1/3 Calvados. (3/4 oz Calvados Reserve Roger Groult)
2/3 Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Add a Cherry.)

Again, something from the 1920s for the fans of the Super Extra Dry Cocktail.

I get cocktails like this from time to time when I order Manhattans, and I have to admit I just kind of wonder what the bartender is thinking (or not.) This combination of decent rum, a very good young Calvados, and Carpano Antica certainly beats the heck out of a luke warm Maker’s with a dash of stale M&R. All the same, it doesn’t beat it by much.

I’d rather just sip a glass of the Calvados.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Depth Bomb Cocktail

Depth Bomb Cocktail

Depth Bomb Cocktail


Depth Bomb Cocktail

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
4 Dashes Grenadine. (Homemade)
1/2 Calvados or Apple Brandy. (Calvados Roger Groult, Réserve 3 years old)
1/2 Brandy. (Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognc)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Two favourite War-time Cocktails. They owed their inspiration to the activities of the famous M.L. Submarine Chasers during the hostilities.

Ostensibly, this is about the same cocktail as the Depth Charge Brandy (6 People); but, what a world of difference the Calvados makes!

In the Depth Charge Brandy made with the Clear Creek Apple Brandy, the Cognac dominated. In this one, I would be hard pressed to detect the Cognac in the cocktail!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Dempsey Cocktail

Dempsey Cocktail

Dempsey Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 tsp. Verte de Fougerolles)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (2/3 tsp. Homemade)
1/2 Gin. (Generous 1 oz Bombay Gin)
1/2 Calvados. (Generous 1 oz Clear Creek Apple Brandy)

Shake (it would probably be more attractive stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’m not sure what Steve McCarthy, the proprietor of Clear Creek, will be more angry about, the crappy photo of his product or the fact that I used his Apple Brandy in this 1930s era “shooter”.

Anyway, I dropped my Mrs. Flannestad’s digital camera just before she was off for a trip to New York City. It seemed like the only civilized thing to do was to buy a new one and give her mine for the trip. Unfortunately, that means I’m stuck with my semi-working crappy old camera, which I also dropped about 2 years ago. At least until her new camera arrives. So you’ll have to bear with me for a couple kind of crap looking cocktails while I figure out if I can get this thing to work.

The Dempsey Cocktail is just booze. I assume it is named after boxer Jack Dempsey, “The Manassa Mauler.” In the general vicinity of the “Bunny Hug,” “Earthquake,” and “Hurricane,” compared to those potent concoctions, the Dempsey Cocktail is actually fairly enjoyable. There’s an almost “holiday” spiciness from the combination of flavors that I didn’t expect.

However, unless you want to be hugging the canvas later in the evening, I don’t recommend over indulging in Dempsey Cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Deuville Cocktail

Deuville Cocktail

Deauville Cocktail

1/4 Brandy. (Generous 1/2 oz Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognac)
1/4 Calvados. (Generous 1/2 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/4 Cointreau. (Generous 1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Lemon Juice. (Generous 1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Quite nice! The equivalent of a 2-1-1 Sidecar.

The use of Brandy and Apple Brandy gives it a bit more interest.

According to wikipedia:

Deauville is a commune of the Calvados département, in the Basse-Normandie région, in France. With its racecourse, harbour, marinas, conference center, villas, Grand Casino and sumptuous hotels, Deauville is regarded as the queen of the Norman beaches.

So the use of Calvados in this cocktail, certainly makes sense.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.