Prairie Oyster Cocktail

Prairie Oyster Cocktail

Prairie Oyster Cocktail.

2 Dashes Vinegar. (Malt Vinegar)
The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Worcestershire Sauce. (From the UK!)
1 Teaspoonful Tomato Catsup. (Chefs Brand Ketchup)
1 Dash of Pepper on Top.

Do not break the Yolk of Egg.

Similar to the Prairie Hen, but only the yolk this time.

While I will recommend you serve this with a shot back, I don’t really get what the big deal is.

It’s just a raw egg, is that so terrifying?

Man (or Woman) up, fer cripes sake!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Philomel Cocktail

Philomel Cocktail

Philomel Cocktail*
(6 People)
2 1/2 glasses of Sherry. (1 1/4 oz Don Nuno Dry Oloroso Sherry)
1 Glass Rum. (1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)
1 1/2 Glasses Quinquina. (3/4 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1 1/2 Glasses Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Orange Juice)

Give one grind of the peppermill over this Shake: serve!

*After which they all sing like nightingales. Whence the name.

Whence the name?

Woo, now that’s a story.

From the wikipedia:

Procne’s husband, king Tereus of Thrace (son of Ares), agreed to travel to Athens and escort Philomela to Thrace for a visit. Tereus lusted for Philomela on the voyage. Arriving in Thrace, he forced her to a cabin in the woods and raped her…Philomela then wove a tapestry (or a robe) that told her story and had it sent to Procne. In revenge, Procne killed her son by Tereus, Itys (or Itylos), and served him to Tereus, who unknowingly ate him. When he discovered what had been done, Tereus tried to kill the sisters; they fled and he pursued but, in the end, all three were changed by the Olympic Gods into birds…Early Greek sources have it that Procne was turned into a nightingale, singing a beautiful but sad song in remorse for the death of her son; Philomela turns into a swallow, which has no song.

For some inexplicable reason, Philomel ends up being another name for the nightingale.

And, uh, well, like the Golden Slipper, that’s an odd myth to want to evoke with a cocktail!

That said, this isn’t an awful cocktail.  Odd, it must be admitted, but rum, dubonnet, and sherry is an interesting flavor combination.  I used the overproof, funk filled, and sadly no longer distributed in the US, Inner Circle Green, as it needed to stand up to all the rest of the ingredients in as a relatively small fraction of the cocktail.  It worked quite well.  Another interesting choice might be a spiced rum, if there were actually any of those worth drinking.

Maybe the New Orleans Cajun Spiced rum?  Would fit right in with the grind of black pepper!

Should you order this cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

Signs point to a definite, “Hmmm.  Let’s think about that before ordering.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.