Brandy Vermouth Cocktail

Brandy Vermouth Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1/4 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso)
3/4 Brandy (2 1/4 oz Pierre Ferrand Cognac Ambre)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass

For some reason I didn’t have much hope for this cocktail. Maybe the not very original name? Or perhaps I expected the Italian Vermouth to overpower the Cognac?

In any case, here’s another Savoy cocktail that defied my expectations.

Tasty and complex. The vermouth nicely underscores elements of the Cognac without overpowering it. The dash of bitters punches it up slightly. The elements combine for some subtle cherry-ish flavors you wouldn’t expect from any of the components. Nice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brandy Special Cocktail

Brandy Special Cocktail

3 or 4 Dashes Gomme Syrup (1 cube demerara sugar)
2 or 3 Dashes Bitters (Angostura)
1 Wineglass Brandy (2 oz Korbel VSOP Brandy)
1 or 2 Dashes Curacao (1 barspoon Brizard Orange Curacao)

(Soak sugar cube in bitters and crush with muddler in bottom of old fashioned glass. Add Curacao, and stir. Add brandy, stir.) Squeeze lemon peel and drop in; fill one-third full of (cracked) ice, and stir with a spoon.

Growing up in Wisconsin, the land of the Brandy Old-Fashioned, the Curacao here is a bit twee, not to mention the use of Korbel VSOP. Doesn’t hurt, though, and gives a bit of leeway to us city folk.

Anyway, if you, (or a bartender you know,) can master this simple formula, you may not find much cause to sample other cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brandy Crusta

Brandy Crusta Cocktail

Use small wine glass. Moisten the edge with lemon and dip edge into castor sugar which frosts the glass. Cut the rind of half a lemon spiral fashion; place in glass. Fill glass with cracked ice.

3 dashes Maraschino.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
4 Dashes Lemon Juice.
1/4 Curacao
3/4 Brandy.

Stir well and strain into prepared glass, adding slice of orange.

I tried a Brandy Crusta sort of half way between the above Savoy and the Jerry Thomas recipe. Quite enjoyed it.

Brandy Crusta for 2:

4 oz Brandy
1/2 oz Brizard Curacao
Juice 1/2 lemon
2 Dashes The Bitter Truth Boker’s Bitters (Bother them, maybe they’ll make another batch!)

Followed Thomas procedure shaking with cracked ice, and straining into small sugared glasses with a half a pared lemon peel each. Unfortunately, pictures didn’t really turn out very well. I don’t have the appropriate glassware, need to work on my sugared rim technique, and sharpen my paring knife.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Boomerang Cocktail

Boomerang Cocktail

1 Dash Lemon Juice
1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1/3 French Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky (1 oz Forty Creek Barrel Select)
1/3 Swedish Punch (1 oz homemade Sri Langkan Arrack Punch)

Shake (stir – eje) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel over glass.)

Tasty; but, the Canadian Whisky didn’t seem to stand much of a chance. It’s all about the punch and the lemon.

Apparently, a version of a cocktail with this name is still made. I’m told, though, it is usually made with Gin, Bitters, Dry Vermouth, and Maraschino Liqueur. Beyond the name, it doesn’t seem to have much to do with the version here.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Blue Bird Cocktail

Blue Bird Cocktail

4 Dashes Angostura Bitters
3/4 Wineglassful of Gin (2 oz Tanqueray)
5 Dashes Orange Curacao (Teaspoon Brizard Orange Curacao)

Shake, (stir, please,) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze Orange Peel over drink.)

A 19th Century style Gin Cock-tail (Link to Jerry Thomas’ recipe on Art of the Drink) by any other name…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Blenton Cocktail

Blenton Cocktail

1/3 French Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat)
2/3 Plymouth Gin (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
dash Angostura Bitters
(Twist Meyer Lemon Peel)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Another of the many, many 2/3 gin and 1/3 French Vermouth cocktails in the Savoy. A perfectly fine Martini variation, I felt improved with the addition of a twist of Meyer Lemon peel. The interesting savory elements of the Plymouth gin and Meyer Lemon Peel went well.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Blanche Cocktail

Blanche Cocktail

1/3 Anisette (1/2 oz Anis del Mono Dulce or as Mrs. Underhill calls it, “Devil Juice”)
1/3 White Curacao (1/2 oz Brizard Orange Curacao)
1/3 Cointreau (1/2 oz Cointreau)
(dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Still trying to make my peace with these pesky after dinner cocktails. Imagining they are intended to be served with coffee, I made my self a cup of tea to go with it. It’s actually pretty tasty trading leisurely sips of the darjeeling tea and Blanche Cocktail. I felt very “Euro”. Orange and Anis weren’t flavors I expected to go together quite this well. Still, very sweet.

There are a few different styles of Absinthe. Verte, which is colored, post distillation, by macerating various herbs in the distillate (primarily Petit Wormwood and Lemon Balm) and Blanche which is uncolored. The Swiss were, and still are, quite famous for the high quality of their Blanche Absinthes.

Fairly certain this cocktail is probably named after the “Blanche” style of Absinthe. If I had used white curacao, the cocktail would be a pearly, opalescent pale white like a Blanche Absinthe. Unfortunately, I only have orange curacao, so the cocktail is a pearly, opalescent pale orange.

BTW, I added the orange bitters because I suspect Curacao used to have more of a bitter orange kick than the style Brizard currently makes it in. One day I’ll have to try the stuff that actually comes from Curacao.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Blackthorn Cocktail

Blackthorn Cocktail
3 Dashes Angostura Bitters
3 Dashes Absinthe (Verte de Fougerolles)
1/2 Irish Whisky (1 1/2 oz Redbreast Irish Whiskey)
1/2 French Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake (stir – eje) well and strain into cocktail glass

The Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) is a bushy, spiny relative of the plum. It is often planted as living barbed wire in rural landscaping. Its wood is quite hard and the one of the traditional materials from which Irish Shillelaghs are made. It is also used to make sturdy walking sticks. The fruit of the Blackthorn is called a sloe and is used to flavor sloe gin.

In the Cocktaildb there are 6 “Blackthorn” cocktails. Many, not surprisingly, involve sloe gin. This version is sometimes called the “Irish Blackthorn”.

It’s a pleasant cocktail, with the smell and taste of the Absinthe being the first thing you notice. The vermouth and Absinthe dominate the middle tastes. There seemed to be a phantom cherry-like taste in the finish. The Irish Whiskey, despite being fairly assertive and quite delicious, seemed to disappear into the cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Biltong Dry Cocktail

Biltong Dry Cocktail

1 Dash Orange Bitters.
1/4 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1/4 Gin. (1/2 oz Tanqueray Gin)
1/2 Caperitif. (1 oz Lillet Dry)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, I can tell you that Biltong (wikipedia link) is a type of dried meat, (beef, game or ostrich,) originally made by Dutch “Pioneers” in South Africa.

Per cocktaildb, I’ve again substituted Lillet Blanc for the defunct South African aperitif wine, Caperitif.

The Biltong cocktail is alright. Pretty decent low alcohol before dinner drink, I should imagine. An olive would probably be a better garnish than the orange zest I used.

After drinking it, I kept thinking it would be better as a long drink over ice or with a splash of soda.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Astoria Cocktail

Astoria Cocktail

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Regan’s)
2/3 Gin (1 1/2 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Serve with stuffed olive.

Yer basic Dry Martini. Get used to it, there are about a million of these in the Savoy Cocktail Book. Interesting to note that the Astoria Cocktail in Crockett’s “Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book” is composed of, 2/3 dry vermouth, 1/3 Old Tom Gin, and 2 Dashes of Orange Bitters. Guess it lost some weight crossing the Atlantic!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.