Cherry Mixture Cocktail

Cherry Mixture Cocktail
Cherry Mixture Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters (Very Healthy Dash)
1 Dash Maraschino (Luxardo Maraschino Cocktail)
1/2 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/2 Italian Vermouth (2 oz Carpano Antica)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass (Build over cracked ice in a double old fashioned glass, stir briefly to chill). Serve with cherry (3 Amarena Toschi Cherries).

A bit of a radical departure from the method.

I just find I enjoy these vermouth type “cocktails” more over ice than up, so there you go.

Quite enjoyed this formulation. A bit on the sweet side. A slightly less bitter Americano ? Maybe most appropriate as a digestiv?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Charles Cocktail

Charles Cocktail

Charles Cocktail

1/2 Italian Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
1/2 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Pierre Ferrand Ambre Cognac)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Shake (stir – eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is the only known authentic Jacobite Cocktail.

Interesting! This seems to indicate that this cocktail was named for Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Silvester Maria Stuart (or Bonny Prince Charles.) I would expect whisky; but, maybe he was a brandy fancier.

I was a little trepidatious about formulating this one, being afraid the Antica would overpower the Cognac, so was going to use the Cinzano Rosso. At the last minute I decided to go with the Antica. Glad I did.

The Carpano Vermouth and Cognac do really interesting things together. It has some nice bitter elements; but, there are some cool almost flowery flavors that are brought out in both the brandy and the vermouth. Nice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Casino Cocktail

Casino Cocktail

Casino Cocktail

2 Dashes Maraschino (2/3 tsp Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters (generous couple splashes Regan’s Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Lemon Juice (2/3 tsp Lemon Juice)
1 Glass Old Tom Gin (2 oz Junipero Gin and a dash simple)

Stir well and add cherry.

Skipped Cherry and am quite cheery about it.

An enjoyably odd cocktail. One of the better features of orange bitters I’ve tried.

On modern cocktail menus, you’ll often find this cocktail significantly reformulated. Moving it away from its roots as a true Cock-tail, and moving it towards a lemon and Maraschino heavy Aviation Cocktail variation. I have to admit I prefer the old-fashioned version.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Capetown Cocktail

Capetown Cocktail

Capetown Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
3 Dashes Curacao (Senior Curacao of Curacao)
1/2 Caperitif (1 1/2 oz Dubonnet Blanc)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Lemon peel on top.

Initially the flavor of the Dubonnet seemed a bit strong. Grew on me though, and as I drank it I started to appreciate the interplay of the Dubonnet, bitters, curacao and lemon. By the time I finished, I was ready for another. Hallmark of a fine cocktail, I believe.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Canadian Whisky Cocktail

Canadian Whisky Cocktail

Canadian Whisky Cocktail

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
2 Teaspoonful Gomme Syrup (2 teaspoons Depaz Cane Syrup)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky (2 oz 40 creek Barrel Select)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel on top.)

I know, I know, this is the same as any other “name_the_spirit cocktail”.

What can I say, I like them. Pretty much all of them.

The funny thing is, this will taste different every time you make it, even if you use the exact same ingredients.

Maybe it’s partly a mood thing, or maybe one day you give it an extra shake of bitters, or a little more whisk(e)y, or a little less sugar.

It’s probably different if you’re a bartender, and can whip these out exactly the same, cocktail after cocktail; but, at home, sometimes the simplest cocktails can be the most interesting.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Calvados Cocktail

Calvados Cocktail

Calvados Cocktail (6 People)

2 Glasses Calvados (1 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
2 Glasses Orange Juice (1 oz Orange Juice)
1 Glass Cointreau (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1 Glass Orange Bitters (1/2 oz Aperol)

Add plenty of ice and shake carefully

Turned this into a single serving drink.

Two main puzzles here.

First, I would expect something called “Calvados Cocktail” to be a Calvados Cocktail. That is to say, Calvados, sugar, bitters, and a twist. What the orange juice is doing here, I don’t know.

Second, “1 Glass Orange Bitters”? The only thing I can think is they might mean an aperitif bitters like the Dutch Hoppe Orange Bitters. The closest thing I could think of was Aperol.

The flavors are there and interesting; but, as written above, it’s too sweet for me.

Suggestions? Thoughts?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cabaret Cocktail

Cabaret Cocktail
Cabaret Cocktail

1 Dash Absinthe (Verte de Fougerolles)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1/2 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Boodles Gin)
1/2 Caperitif (1 1/2 oz Dubonnet Blanc)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add a Cherry.

Boodles and Absinthe go very well together. As I am well known for enjoying Martini variaions, it will probably be no surprise to anyone that I quite enjoyed this cocktail. Though, I could do without the cherry.

My Lillet Blanc was getting tired tasting, so I thought I would give Dubonnet Blanc a try as a Caperitif Substitute. It’s an interesting difference and a nice change. The citrus is much stronger in the Lillet, and it also seems sweeter.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Bush Ranger Cocktail

Bush-Ranger Cocktail

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
1/2 Caperitif (1 1/2 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/2 Bacardi Rum (1 1/2 oz Santa Teresa Gran Reserva)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with orange zest.)

Usually, Lillet and Orange are flavors I enjoy, however, with the rum here, my embellishment doesn’t quite work. Also, as usual, I have no idea how close a substitution Lillet blanc is for the defunct South African aperitif wine, Caperitif.

I like the more expensive Santa Teresa 1796 rum; but, remain kind of unimpressed by the Gran Reserva. It’s just not got a lot of character. Also, I think my Lillet is getting old and needs to be replaced. When the cocktail warmed up, I definitely detected a little “refrigerator” taste. I will probably re-try this cocktail at a later date with a different rum and some new aperitif wine.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Buds Special Cocktail

Buds Special Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1/3 Sweet Cream (3/4 oz Whipping Cream)
2/3 Cointreau (1 1/2 oz Cointreau)

Stir (What? Shake!) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Orange Peel.)

I guess I had an idle hope that this would be something like a Creamsicle in drink form.

After tasting it, my response was, “Bleah! Bud, man, what were you thinking?”

I don’t normally have such a strong reaction to these cocktails, but, hopes dashed, down the sink after a couple sips.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brazil Cocktail

Brazil Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1 Dash Absinthe (1/4 barspoon Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
1/2 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat)
1/2 Sherry (2 oz Lustau Solera Reserva Dry Oloroso Sherry “Don Nuño”)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

The Absinthe and Lemon add a nice flavor to the Sherry and Vermouth. The flavors were actually more interesting as it warmed in the glass than when I first poured it. Still, not something I would likely choose to sample again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.