Mule’s Hind Leg Cocktail

Mule's Hind Leg Cocktail

The Mule’s Hind Leg

1/5 Gin. (1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)
1/5 Benedictine. (scant 1/2 oz Benedictine)
1/5 Applejack. (1/2 oz Clear Creek 2 year Apple Brandy)
1/5 Maple Syrup. (scant 1/2 oz Maple Syrup)
1/5 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Zwack Barack Palinka)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Another lovely prohibition era libation from the oeuvre of Judge Jr.

The only possible way I could see drinking this was to use apricot eau-de-vie instead of apricot liqueur. Even then, this is pretty much a waste of perfectly good alcohol.

Reduce the Benedictine and the Maple Syrup to a bar spoon or so. Add some bitters.

There might be a drink worth salvaging here.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Honolulu Cocktail (No 2)

Honolulu Cocktail (No. 2)

1/3 Maraschino. (3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray)
1/3 Benedictine. (3/4 oz Benedictine)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I suppose that is what it should be.

I just couldn’t quite face that cocktail. Thinking about the Maraschino and Benedictine, Oude Genever occurred to me.

Oude Genever

Yes, indeed that seems like a good idea!

Honolulu Cocktail No2

Honolulu Cocktail (No. 2)

1/3 Maraschino. (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Gin. (1 oz Van Wees Oude Genever)
1/3 Benedictine. (1/2 oz Benedictine)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

Tweaked the proportions slightly, but didn’t want to just turn it into an Improved Holland Gin Cocktail. Still quite sweet, but really, really tasty. 1 1/2 oz Oude Genever, 1/4 oz Luxardo, 1/4 oz Benedictine, maybe some bitters, and this would rock. Probably have to think up a different name… Kailua Cocktail? Diamond Head Cocktail? Why is this a Hawaii themed Cocktail name anyway? I could see No. 1 being Hawaii-esque, since it had Pineapple juice. But Gin, Maraschino, and Benedictine?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Froupe Cocktail

Froupe Cocktail

l Teaspoonful Benedictine.
1/2 Italian vermouth. (generous 1 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso)
1/2 Brandy. (Generous 1 oz Cerbois VSOP Armangac)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

Another Savoy typo, it appears. Robert Vermeire calls this the “Fioupe Cocktail” and states, “Monsieur Fioupe is a familiar figure known all along the Riviera, by everybody, from prince to cabman.”

Sadly, I can’t find any more information than that regarding Monsieur Fioupe.

The cocktail, though, being basically a Brandy version of the Bobby Burns, is right in my comfort zone. Yum.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Creole Cocktail

Creole Cocktail

Creole Cocktail

1/2 Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica)
2 Dashes Benedictine. (2/3 tsp. Benedictine)
2 Dashes Amer Picon. (2/3 tsp. homemade)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Twist lemon peel on top.

A very good cocktail, that, like the Brooklyn, has a real problem in the lack of a key ingredient: Amer Picon.

Amer Picon is a french bitter orange aperitif brand that is owned by Diageo. For some inexplicable reason Diageo refuses to import it into the United States. I dunno why. We’re not worthy, they don’t think there’s enough of a market, they just don’t like America. Something like that.

So if you want to try a Creole, or a Brooklyn, you’ve got a couple choices.

You can travel to France and buy Amer Picon. Unfortunately, even this is fraught with danger, as a few years ago Diageo changed the recipe for the product, reducing its proof. Maybe they aren’t hating on America at all. Perhaps they are just sparing us from a mediocre modern version of the product!?

You can try to make it yourself using Jamie Boudreau’s recipe, Amer Picon.

Last, you can try for a replacement.

Your first choice for a replacement, as I did previously with the Brooklyn, is to use Torani Amer. Torani Amer is a nice product, but unfortunately, as far as I can tell, doesn’t taste all that much like Amer Picon. It’s a bit too vegetal and not orangey enough. It makes a good Brooklyn or Creole, but not a great one.

A second choice of replacement is an obscure Italian Amaro called CioCiaro. It is more common in some US markets than others. It’s good, but not quite as bitter or orangey as Amer Picon. If you can find it, add a dash of Regan’s or Angostura orange bitters to your cocktail and you should be in business.

Another option is to make Jamie Boudreau’s recipe. Jamie’s recipe isn’t too hard. He is, after all, very lazy. Basically you modify a less obscure Italian Amaro called Ramzotti by pumping up the oranginess. The only annoying part is that it takes two months to make the orange tincture. Oh, and you have to find a source for bitter orange peels.

Being nearly as lazy as Jamie, but slightly less patient, I worked out this adaption of his recipe:

7 oz vodka
1 orange
10 oz Ramzzotti Amaro
2 oz Stirring’s Blood Orange Bitters
1 drop orange oil

Microplane the zest of 1 orange into the vodka. Let stand a few minutes. Filter through 4 layers of cheese cloth into a clean bottle, squeezing out as much liquid as possible.

Pour Ramzotti Amaro through cheese cloth and orange zest, again squeezing out as much liquid as possible.

Add Blood Orange bitters and orange oil.

Shake to mix. It’s probably best to let it sit for a day or so.

I’m not totally sold, I think it might slightly overdo the fresh orange flavor. But it isn’t bad and doesn’t take 2 months to make. Definitely prefer it to Torani Amer.

Anyway, so you’ve done all that, and you’ve got some form of Amer Picon replacement. What’s up with the cocktail? It’s kind of hilarious. To be honest, the Creole is one of the most inexplicably fruity and, dare I say it, silly whiskey cocktails going. The intersection between the orange of the Amer Picon, the vermouth (I think especially if you use Carpano Antico), the whiskey and the lemon peel is almost comical. Comical and delicious.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cornell Special Cocktail

Cornell Special Cocktail

The Cornell Special Cocktail

1/4 Part Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray)
1/4 Part Benedictine. (3/4 oz Benedictine)
1/4 Part Lemon. (3/4 oz Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice)
1/4 Part Lithia Water. (3/4 oz Gerolsteiner Heavy Mineral Content Mineral Water)

Stir well and serve in cocktail glass.

Well, this one gave me a lot of trouble. I found some online sources that purported to sell “Lithia Water” but none of them would return my phone calls or emails. Driving all the way to Ashland, Oregon seemed pretty crazy.

Did some more research, trying to find mineral waters with a high mineral content and taste. Gerolsteiner was one, and according to some web sites, actually contains some Lithium (Not to mention 8% of your daily allowance of Calcium! Now that is heavy mineral content!)

A lot of chasing around for a drink that ends up tasting like slightly herbaceous, sparkling lemonade. Difficult or not, it certainly is easy drinking.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Chrysanthemum Cocktail

Chrysanthemum Cocktail

Chrysanthemum Cocktail

3 Dashes Absinthe (1 tsp. Lucid Absinthe)
1/3 Benedictine (1 oz Benedictine)
2/3 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

Well-known and very popular in the American Bar of the S.S. “Europa.”

The Chrysanthemum cocktail really surprised me. I expected it to be far too sweet and/or vermouth-ey.

It really isn’t.

The sweetness is about on level with that of a not too sweet gewurtztraminer or glass of apple juice.

Deliciously complex, yet every ingredient is there to be savored.

It’s true I am a sucker for pretty much any cocktail with Bendictine; but this is one of my new favorites. Definitely something I will make again.

By, the way, the S.S. Europa had its own interesting history:

S.S. Europa

Launched on March 19, 1930, she served peace time passengers for Germany, participated in war time activities for the Third Reich, was confiscated by the US in 1945, took part in troop movement for the US soldiers, then back to passengers for France after WWII as the S.S. Liberté. Finally the scrap yards of Italy in 1962.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Brain-Storm Cocktail

Brain-Storm Cocktail

1/2 Wineglass Irish Whisky (1 1/2 oz Red Breast Whisky)
2 Dashes Benedictine (1 Barspoon Benedictine)
2 Dashes French Vermouth (1 Barspoon Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Squeeze orange peel on top. (Drop peel into mixing glass.) Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

I liked this one a lot, actually. It’s fairly subtle, as cocktails go. Whiskey, herbey, orange. Sophisticated, I’d go so far as to say.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Bobby Burns Cocktail

Bobby Burns Cocktail.*

1/2 Italian Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/2 Scotch Whisky (1 1/2 oz Compass Box Asyla)
3 Dashes Benedictine (Barspoon Benedictine)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

*One of the very best Whisky Cocktails. A very fast mover on Saint Andrews Day.

I am inclined to agree with the authors of The Savoy. Boy, I enjoyed this cocktail. The complexity of the Bitter Vermouth, the briny Scotch, and the slight sweet herbaceousness of the Benedictine, all highlighted with the brightness of the lemon zest. Just about everything I like in a brown liquor cocktail in a single glass. It really doesn’t get much better than this.

I always make this cocktail in celebration of Burns Night, a fine tradition celebrating the life and works of Scottish Poet, Robert Burns. I first learned about Burns Night a few years ago while listening to the radio shows of the late John Peel.

From Burns’ Poem “A Bottle and Friend”:

Here’s a bottle and an honest friend!
What wad ye wish for mair, man?
Wha kens, before his life may end,
What his share may be o’care, man?

Then catch the moments as they fly,
and use them as ye ought, man.
Believe me, happiness is shy,
and comes not aye when sought, man.

Now I’m not sure if this cocktail, or the similar “Robert Burns Cockail”, were actually named after the poet in question. And Burns probably would disapprove of sullying Scotch with water and other questionable materials. Still, on Burns night, we put on Camera Obscura’s album of Burns’ Poetry and raise a glass to the memories of John Peel and Robert Burns.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.