Sevilla Cocktail (No. 2)

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Sevilla Cocktail (No. 2)
1/2 teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1/2 teaspoon caster sugar)
1 Egg (1 Large Egg)
1/2 Port Wine. (1 1/2 oz Warre’s Warrio Port)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Havana Club Anejo Blanco)

Stir (I shook) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Stir this cocktail? Nearly every other drink in the book they direct you to shake, but this one has a whole egg and they tell you to stir? Ridiculous!

Didn’t particularly care for this drink, despite it being merely spitting difference from the thoroughly enjoyable Coffee Cocktail.  Not sure what is up with that.  I think maybe a darker rum might make it more enjoyable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sevilla Cocktail (No. 1)

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Sevilla Cocktail (No. 1)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica)
1/2 Bacardi rum. (1 oz Havana Club 7)
1 Piece of Orange Peel.
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze another piece of orange peel over the drink.)

Similar to the Fair and Warmer, Fluffy Ruffles, Little Princess, and Palmetto Cocktail this is another Rum (or Cuban) Manhattan, and, as such, what’s not to like?  Pick your rum, pick your vermouth, and go to it.  Happened to have a bottle of Havana Club 7 around the house, so that’s what I went with.  Thoroughly enjoyable.

I am nominally confused what a Rum Manhattan has to do with Sevilla.  Maybe it should be stirred with Seville Orange (or bitter orange) peel in the drink, instead of sweet orange peel?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

September Morn Cocktail

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September Morn Cocktail.
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1 Tablespoonful Grenadine. (1 Tablespoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
The White of 1 Egg. (1/2 oz Egg White)
1 Glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Havana Club Anejo Blanco)
(Dry shake liquid ingredients, add ice and…) Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Not sure how you want to look at this. A Clover Club with Rum instead of Gin? A Bacardi Cocktail with Egg White? Either works, I guess.

The name of this drink probably comes from a “scandalous painting”.

From an article by Bonnie Bell: The September Morn Story.

On a September morning in 1912, French painter Paul Chabas finished the painting he had been working on for three consecutive summers. Thus completed, it was aptly titled “Matinee de Septembre” (September Morn). As was typical of his style, the painting was of young maiden posed nude in a natural setting. This time the icy morning waters of Lake Annecy in Upper Savoy formed the natural setting and the maiden was a local peasant girl. The head, however, had been painted from the sketch of a young American girl, Julie Phillips (later Mrs. Thompson), which he had made while she and her mother were sitting in a Paris cafe. Apparently, he had found her profile to be exactly what he was looking for. The completed painting was then sent off to the Paris Salon of 1912 to be exhibited. Although the painting won Mr. Chabas the Medal of Honor, it caused no flurry of attention. Hoping to find a buyer, the artist shipped the painting overseas to an American gallery.

It was here in America that the painting was destined to receive undreamed of publicity and popularity. One day in May of 1913, displayed in the window of a Manhattan art gallery, it caught the eye of Anthony Comstock, head of the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice. Horrified by what he saw, he stormed into the store, flashed his badge, and roared: “There’s too little morn and too much maid. Take her out!” The gallery manager, however, refused to do so. The ensuing controversy was given wide publicity by the press and the painting was simultaneously denounced and defended across the entire country. Meanwhile, curious crowds filled the street outside the shop straining to see the painting that caused such a stir.

More information here:

The September Morn Hoax

As for the cocktail, it is quite tasty, especially when made with a flavorful grenadine and rum.  Chuckle, I suppose it is the pink, fleshy color of the drink and the painting, which whomever invented it was thinking of.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Santiago Cocktail

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Santiago Cocktail
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hands Food Grenadine)
2 Dashes Lemon Juice. (1 teaspoon Lemon Juice)
1 Glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Barbancourt White Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Being slightly generous here with the proportions of Grenadine and Lemon Juice in this Daiquiri-like cocktail. I’m also picking a slightly more flavorful r(h)um that I would typically, as the drink is basically all spirits.

It isn’t awful, exactly, as I am very fond of Barbancourt’s white rum in most contexts. It is not, however, the sort of drink that you would probably make for someone who doesn’t like the flavor of booze in their cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Roulette Cocktail

Roulette-2

Roulette Cocktail.
1/4 Swedish Punch. (1/2 oz Underhill-Lounge Homemade)
1/4 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz Montecristo White Rum)
1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Roger Groult Reserve Calvados)
Shake (I stirred) will and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, this is quite sweet. Still, it is kind of interesting as a vehicle for Calvados and Swedish Punch. It would not be a horrible after dinner drink. The Montecristo White seems to simply serve as filler here, not really contributing much, at least in the face of such strong flavors as the Calvados and Swedish Punch.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

President Cocktail

President Cocktail

President Cocktail.

2 Dashes Grenadine. (1/2 tsp. homemade grenadine)
The Juice of 1/4 Orange.
1 glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Mathusalem Platino)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze Orange peel over glass.)

This should be better than it is.  But I think the main problem is the lack of character in the Mathusalem Platino.  If ever there was a rum that is nearly vodka, this is it.  I can barely detect rum in any cocktail I make with it.

I dunno, maybe if you had really good oranges and the best homemade grenadine evar (or small hand foods grenadine) this might be worth experimenting with.

As it is, it’s basically a screwdriver.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pooh-Bah Cocktail

Pooh-Bah Cocktail

Pooh-Bah Cocktail.

1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Ron Mathusalem Platino)
1 Dash Apricot Brandy. (1 dash Rothman and Winter Apricot Liqueur)
1/3 Swedish Punch. (3/4 oz Underhill-Punsch)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Add a Luxardo Chery.)

We always get a couple orders for these during Savoy Night at Alembic Bar. I guess because of the funny name and the fact that it contains Swedish Punch.  And, frankly you could do worse.

Still, it it is awfully sweet, so you could definitely do better, and you could definitely to a lot to improve it by making it with a more interesting rum than the Mathusalem Platino.

Personally, I’d be awfully tempted to grab the Appleton V/X or a mild Agricole like Barbancourt.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Poker Cocktail

Poker Cocktail

Poker Cocktail.
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Havana Club 7 Year)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I decided to not gamble too much with the Poker Cocktail and upped the ante with Punt e Mes and an aged rum.

While I wouldn’t call this exactly a royal flush or four of a kind, it certainly beats a pair of deuces, hands down.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

New Life Cocktail

Hercules remains, more or less, a mystery.

To summarize, for many years because of a description in Stan Jones’ Barguide which called it an Absinthe substitute, it was thought to be exactly that.  Something like Ricard or Pernod.

However, when I started making these Savoy recipes, none of them made taste sense when made with Pernod or Ricard.  They were just awful.

About this time, I saw an advertisement that popped up from time to time on the front page of the cocktaildb. It was for a Dutch product called Hercules which was a aromatized and fortified red wine. I made a couple cocktails which call for Hercules with Cocchi’s Barolo Chinato and they made a lot more sense.

I started doing more digging and turned up some advertisements in Google Books for a product called Hercules available at about the same time the Savoy Cocktail Book was published.

HERCULES “HEALTH – COCKTAILS ARE SERVED AT LEADING BARS. “Hercules” can be had plain, when so preferred, or as the chief and most fascinating ingredient…that Create Appetite and Stimulate Digestion “Hercules” Wine Aperitif contains the phenomenal properties of Yerba-Mate, which has won the high opinion…TO TEST “HERCULES” WINE APERITIF send fi/6 for a full-sired bottle, carriage paid.
We will despatch by return. Later supplies must be obtained of Wine…

Instead of being an Absinthe substitute, Hercules turned out to be a wine based aperitif one of whose ingredients was Yerba Mate!

In addition, a London friend, Jeff Masson asked around about it.  Turned out that a friend of his was acquainted with some of the ex-Savoy bartenders.  While the most recent bartender didn’t recall Hercules, his predecessor at the bar did!

From Jeff:

Did a little more research into this mystery ingredient but found nothing amazing.
I spoke to a friend who knows Peter Dorelli, the former head bartender of the Savoy, very well. I asked him to find out what he could.
Peter had never tasted the ingredient but called his former head bartender, Joe Gilmore, who is now around 85!
He remembered Hercules quite well and described it as a cross between an aperetif and a bitters. It was light pink in colour and bore no resemblance to Absinthe. He didn’t have any real suggestions for a substitute but mentioned Dubonnet would not be appropriate.
Not conclusive but quite interesting.

OK, a bitter wine based aperitif flavored with Yerba Mate.

Current try at reproduction:

1 bottle Navarro White Table Wine
1/4 cup Yerba Mate
1 tablespoon Gentian
1 clove
Dried Peel from 1 Seville Orange
1/2 stick Ceylon Cinnamon
1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup Havana Club 8 Year Rum

Method: Combine all ingredients other than rum, bring to 140 degrees for 10 minutes. Strain off solids, cool, and add rum. Refrigerate.

I purposely kept this simple, to try and get more of a feel for appropriate taste combinations with the Yerba Mate. Initial thoughts are that it has too much gentian to be drunk on it’s own for pleasure. But it’s close. Tasting other vermouth I have around, I find many seem to have more culinary herbs in the middle flavors than this. Might have to experiment with including some thyme, mint, or oregano next time. I’m also not sure if the color came from the wine or if it was colored, so skipped that for the time being. Since most vermouth is made on a white wine base, I would guess it was colored, perhaps with cochineal or similar.

New Life Cocktail

New Life Cocktail

1/4 Hercules. (1/2 oz “Hercules”)
1/4 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz Montecristo Rum)
1/2 Cointreau. (1 oz Cointreau)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

That’s a lot of Cointreau, but every other recipe for the New Life I can find uses the same proportions, so I guess it isn’t a typo.

While it is sweet, it is kind of tasty. However, drinking it, I was reminded of the unique flavors of Armazem Viera’s Esmeralda Cachaca. Remaking it with Cachaca instead of the Montecristo rum did make for a much more interesting cocktail.  Interesting that these two South American flavors would compliment each other.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Nevada Cocktail

Nevada Cocktail

The Nevada Cocktail

1 Hooker of Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Montecristo White)
The Juice of 1/2 Grapefruit. (Shoot, should have measured.)
The Juice of 1 Lime. (Juice 1/2 lemon)
Powdered Sugar. (Scant teaspoon caster sugar)
1 Dash Bitters. (1 dash Angostura)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is another one from Judge Jr.’s prohibition era tome, “Here’s How!”

Actually probably the best drink of any from that book so far. Really highlights the floral flavors of the rum, grapefruit, and bitters.

About all I’d say is it’s a bit too large. Divided in two, this would be a good appetizer cocktail. Bittersweet and tart. This large and it gets a bit acid-ey on the stomach by the end.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.