Zazarac Cocktail

Wow, this cocktail, and one more and a major portion of this project completed.

Oh, wait, I will have to change the footer, if I am going to continue on after the Zed…

Zazarac Cocktail
1/6 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Barbancourt 8 Year)
1/6 Anisette. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/6 Gomme Syrup. (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Mesquite Bean Syrup)
1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1/3 oz Rittenhouse Bonded)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Bitters)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)
3 Dashes Absinthe. (3 dash Absinthe)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Out of Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup, so instead substituting Mesquite Bean Syrup, which is made by extracting the juice from the mesquite bean pods that grow abundantly in the deserts of the southwestern United States.

As usual, in cocktails sourced from Harry McElhone’s 1928 “ABC of Cocktails”, that Harry Calls for Rye Whiskey instead of the Savoy Cocktail Book’s Canadian Club.

Such a long ingredient list, you just sort of wonder what was going on in the head of the person who threw all this together. Had they had a Sazerac many years ago and were attempting to recreate the flavor with ingredients they had at hand?

There is an interesting and somewhat unexpected spiciness, reminiscent of fruitcake. Still, there is no way this is anything other than way too sweet, even well stirred.

Spatchcock that chicken.

Really, I just like to say, “Spatchcock”. It’s probably a character flaw.

But it really is an awesome way to flatten out a chicken and roast it evenly. Works for Turkeys too!

The Roast Chicken with bread salad from Zuni Cafe, no matter how literally you take Judy Rodgers’ crazily detailed instructions, is a truly awesome presentation. One of the best dishes from that generation of chefs. Roast a chicken. Then deglaze your pan with wine and a little vinegar. Adjust seasonings. Fill a bowl with bitter greens, like Arugula, add some freshly toasted croutons. Pour the warm dressing over the greens and croutons and toss to combine. Serve your roast chicken pieces on top. So tasty!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Cocktail

White Cocktail
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 Dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters)
2 Teaspoonsful Anisette. (2 tsp. Anis del Mono Dulce)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

According to Robert Vermiere’s “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”, this is a, “Recipe by Harry Brecker, Antwerp.”

I guess Mr. Brecker was fond of the booze, as this is nothing but cold booze and Orange Bitters.

I also found myself enjoying it, though aware that this enjoyment was a somewhat dangerous, double edged sword, with potential consequences.

As to why Junipero Gin, sometimes there is no time for half measures.

Or as Winston Churchill said, “The era of procrastination, of half-measures, of soothing and baffling expedients, of delays is coming to its close. In its place we are entering a period of consequences.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Which Way Cocktail

Which Way Cocktail
1/3 Absinthe (3/4 oz Kubler Absinthe)
1/3 Anisette (3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/3 Brandy (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)
Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

Which Way?

I believe, yes, you may have some problems with directionality after a couple of these sweet boozy treats.

Which way did he go?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Suisse Cocktail

Suisse Cocktail
The White of 1 Egg. (1/2 oz Egg White)
4 Dashes Anisette. (1/4 oz Anis del Mono Dulce)
1 Liqueur Glass Absinthe. (1 1/2 oz Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe)
Syrup or Sugar can be used instead of Anisette.
Shake well and strain into medium size glass. (Add a dash of Blanquette de Limoux, Cuvee Berlene 2005 on top.)

When you examine Harry MacElhone’s recipe for the “Swisess” from “Barflies and Cocktails” you see that, perhaps, Mr. Craddock missed something.

Swisess. 1 white of a Fresh Egg; 1 teapoonful of Anisette Syrup; 1 glass of Absinthe. Shake well together and strain into a small wineglass, and add a dash of syphon on top. This is a very good bracer for that feeling of the morning after the night before.

Ah, a dash of syphon! Hmmm… Wait, I think the soda water is a little tired, but I still have some fairly fresh Blanquette de Limoux. No, I couldn’t, that would be just too evil. Oh yes, yes I can.

Well, plus, I did have to include Harry MacElhone’s quote, as it is one of my all time favorite turns of phrase describing a hangover.

Still don’t have appropriate fizz glasses, so sad. This souvenir beer glass from Jesse Friedman’s Notoberfest 2009 is actually not all that bad. About the right size, and not a horrible shape for a fizz. Probably the best I have at the moment.

Is the cocktail any good?  Well, if you like Death in the Afternoon, this is a richer, anisier drink.  I enjoyed it, especially with the delicious complexity of the Germain-Robin/Greenway Distillers Absinthe Superior.  Quite nice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Snowball Cocktail

006

Snowball Cocktail
1/6 Crème de Violette. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Benoit Serres liqueur de violette)
1/6 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Brizard White Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Anisette. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/6 Sweet Cream. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray Gin*)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is woman’s work.

I have, in the past, put myself on record as saying this is possibly one of the worst cocktails in the entire Savoy cocktail Book.

Oddly, I have made this monstrosity on more than one occasion during our Savoy Cocktail Book Nights at Alembic Bar. In fact, one time it was even an out of town bartender who asked for it. I was like, “Really?! You know what is in that, right?” Yet he persisted in his desire to experience the Snowball. Curious. Whenever we make it there, it just seems so much worse than anything else we make in the course of the evening.

Considered on its own, however, and in this rather diminutive size, I am not entirely sure it is without its own charms. Perhaps it was my choice of brands? Tanqueray having a bit more spine than the usual Beefeater, Benoit Serres being a fine Violette, Brizard being a tasty Menthe, and Anis del Mono, one of the finest spanish Anis.

In any case, this wasn’t quite the creamy mouthwash disaster I remember. Still, as the Savoy Cocktail Book sez, this really is “Women’s Work”.

*The jungle wrapped, half bottle of Tanqueray Gin used in this cocktail was sent to me by a firm promoting the brand, and, as you may have read on other blogs, the putative birthday of Charles Tanqueray, alleged inventor of the gin. I actually like to have Tanqueray in the house, as it is a fine example of Juniper heavy London Dry Gin. However, as it is rather more expensive than the always useful Beefeater, I often pass it up and save my “special gin” money for things like Junipero. Drinking it in this cocktail, I am reminded that it is really a very good gin.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Shanghai Cocktail

029

Shanghai Cocktail
2 Dashes Grenadine. (5ml Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
3/8 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/8 Anisette. (1/4 oz Anis del Mono Dulce a.k.a. Devil Juice)
1/2 Jamaica Rum. (1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Annoying measures, to be sure. I think I got it mostly right, though every time I look at it, I think it is wrong.

Amusingly, when Mrs. Flannestad was in High School, she traveled to France for an exchange trip. Probably one of the formative experiences of her life, as she met some of her best friends to this day. But anyway, for some reason, she took to swigging Marie Brizard Anisette, so much so, that some of her schoolmates started calling her “Marie Brizard”.

Sadly, the Brizard products seem to have evaporated from many of the local liquor stores. Not sure what is up with that, as I always meant to get some of their White Creme de Cacao. Anyone have a suggestion for another decent White Creme de Cacao brand? I haven’t been much impressed with any I have tried so far.

This is a very odd drink, a combination I would never make if it weren’t for the Savoy Cocktail Book Project, to be sure. A Jamaican Rum Sour sweetened with Grenadine and Anisette. I was drinking it, and thinking, “this is weird, but I sort of like it.” Fairly tart and with an interesting light sweetness from the anise, it is oddly refreshing. So odd, that I thought I should try and get a second opinion, so I ran it past Mrs. Flannestad. She also was of the not entirely unguarded opinion, “I kind of like it.”

Not a lost classic, by any means, but a pretty interesting flavor combination, and not entirely unlikeable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Night Cap Cocktail

Night Cap Cocktail

Night Cap Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1/3 Anisette. (3/4 oz Gantous and Abou Rad Arak)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Dudognon Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve written about “Arak” before in the post “Ar(r)a(c)k Disambiguation“. This is the Anise flavored grape spirit from Lebanon.  Because there are various degrees of sweetness in Anisette and Anise flavored liqueurs and this drink is already 1/3 orange liqueur, I figured it would be fun to pretend it called for a dry style anise liqueur and use Arak instead of Anisette.

The Night Cap is also a fine example of me not being able to follow a recipe even though I try hard to read them and execute. I knew I was running low on Cointreau, so stopped to buy some on the way home.

Then I looked at the recipe. Checked for the Orange Curacao in the kitchen cupboard. Headed down to the basement to find the Arak. Came back upstairs and made the recipe with Cointreau. Why, I do not know.  Sometimes my hands just don’t tell my brain what they are doing.

So, even though I didn’t really quite make the recipe accurately, ooops, this was quite tasty.  Anise and orange are a proven great combination and the brandy brings some sort of other mediation to the party.  Definitely an enjoyable cocktail, so  I can’t see going back and doing it the “right” way.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ladies’ Cocktail

Ladies' Cocktail

Ladies’ Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 tsp. Sirene Absinthe Verte)
2 Dashes Anisette. (2/3 tsp. Anis del Mono dulce)
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
1 Glass of Canadian Club Whisky. (1 3/4 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select, 1/4 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)

Stir well and put small piece of pineapple (1/4 orange slice) in glass.

Chuckle, I’d like to meet the Ladies who drink cocktails like this!

I am reminded of a recent episode at a bar.

At a bar near where I work, which is a kind of divey beer and whiskey kind of place, I decided to experiment and ask for a cocktail. “Manhattan, no cherry.” Bartender gave me a look and went off to mix the cocktail. When he brought it back, he looked around and asked, “Is there someone with you? Did you want something else?” The implication being that the Manhattan had certainly to be for a girl that was accompanying me, and he expected me to order a proper man’s drink like beer, whiskey, or whiskey rocks. I made a mental note and sipped my girly cocktail.

Anyway, the Ladies’ Cocktail, effeminate or not, is quite tasty. Pretty similar to a Sazerac. If I weren’t Savoy Stomping, I would make it with Rye Whiskey and be done with it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Café De Paris Cocktail

Cafe des Paris Cocktail

Café De Paris Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg
3 Dashes Anisette (1 Barspoon Anis del Mono)
1 Teaspoonful of Fresh Cream
1 Glass of Dry Gin (2 oz Boodles Gin)

Shake well and strain into medium size glass.

Kind of underimpressed with this one. Maybe I overshook and it got a bit diluted? Anyway, I felt like the anis could have been a bit stronger, and the cocktail a bit sweeter.

Cafe de Paris is a famous nightclub in London.

The Prince of Wales was a well known guest in the early days, somehow insuring the club’s success. Hmmm… Wait a sec. Seems familiar somehow… Something about Prince Harry and a treasure box, Mahiki tiki bar becoming successful in London. Do the British never get tired of these characters?

Anyway, my favorite story from the Cafe de Paris website:

In 1939 the Café was allowed to stay open even though theatres and cinemas were closed by order. People gossiped their way through the blackout and the Café was advertised as a safe haven by Martin Poulson, the maitre d’, who argued that the four solid storeys of masonry above were ample protection. This tragically proved to be untrue on March 8th 1941 when two 50K landmines came through the Rialto roof straight onto the Café dance floor. Eighty people were killed, including Ken ‘Snakehips’ Johnston who was performing onstage at the time and Poulson whose words had come back to haunt him. Had the bomb been dropped an hour later, the casualties would have been even higher.

The Ken Snakehips Johnson Story. I’ll take that over a story about the English monarchy any day.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Broken Spur Cocktail

Broken Spur Cocktail

1 Egg Yolk
2/3 White Port (2 oz Quinto do Infantado White Port)
1/6 Dry Gin (1 oz Tanqueray)
1/6 Gancia Vermouth (1 oz Cinzano Rosso Vermouth)
1 teaspoon Brisard (sic.) Anisette (1 teaspoon Anis del Mono Dulce)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with freshly grated nutmeg. – eje)

Once again, my poor grasp of fractions betrayed me. I thought the vermouth seemed a bit heavy in the flavor profile.

This would be more accurate:

1 Egg Yolk
1 1/2 oz White Port
1/2 of 3/4 oz Dry Gin
1/2 of 3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth
1 teaspoon anisette

The drink seemed a little flat to start out with. The nutmeg, (not pictured), punched it up greatly, and I highly recommend adding it as a garnish.

The drink itself is one of the better eggey flip-ey things I’ve tried. Liked it much more than I expected.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.