White Lily Cocktail

White Lily Cocktail
1/3 Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Barbancourt White)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Miller’s Gin)
1 Dash Absinthe. (dash Absinthe Duplais Verte)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I normally don’t enjoy drinks from Judge Jr.’s 1927 book, “Here’s How”, but I found the White Lily strangely interesting.

There is just something fascinating about the combination of Barbancourt White Rhum, Orange, Miller’s Gin, and Absinthe.

However, I suppose I am cheating slightly by using a rum like Barbancourt instead of a Dry Cuban Style Rum. Even being a fairly mild agricole-ish rum, Barbancourt brings a lot more to the party than the average Molasses based white rum. So sue me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Whip Cocktail

Whip Cocktail
1 Dash Absinthe.
3 Dashes Curacao.
1/4 French Vermouth.
1/4 Italian Vermouth.
1/4 Brandy.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

When I was researching this cocktail, I discovered it in Robert Vermiere’s 1922 “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”.

In that he says, “This cocktail is well known amongst the naval officers of the Mediterranean Squadron. It is composed of: 1/8 gill Absinthe Pernod; 1/8 gill of French Vermouth; 1/8 gill of Brandy; 1/8 gill of Curacao; Shake until Frozen. In Egypt they call it “Kurbag,” which is the Arabic word for whip.”

So, in Vermeire’s world, the Whip is an equal parts cocktail.

Figured I’d give that a go.

Whip Cocktail

1/2 oz Jade PF 1901 Absinthe
1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
1/2 oz Clement Creole Shrubb Orange Liqueur
1/2 oz Osocalis Rare Alambic Brandy

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

Just coming off of the nearly undrinkable Which Way Cocktail, it’s interesting to see how much difference the moderation of a bit of vermouth adds to the enjoyment of the drink.  Well, that and some variety of taste from Orange Liqueur instead of Anisette.

This isn’t bad, not bad at all, and it didn’t need the rejiggering given to it by the Savoy editors.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Which Way Cocktail

Which Way Cocktail
1/3 Absinthe (3/4 oz Kubler Absinthe)
1/3 Anisette (3/4 oz Anis del Mono dulce)
1/3 Brandy (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)
Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

Which Way?

I believe, yes, you may have some problems with directionality after a couple of these sweet boozy treats.

Which way did he go?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Weeseur Special Cocktail

Weeseur Special Cocktail.
4 Dashes Absinthe. (1 tsp. Absinthe)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Orange Curacao. (1/2 oz Clement Creole Shrubb)
1/4 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

As a variation on the Martini (Medium), or perhaps Fourth Degree, the Weeseur isn’t bad. I do like the Creole Shrubb and awful lot, it is one of my favorite Orange Liqueurs, so I rarely complain when I get a excuse to use it.

The name seems like it should be Dutch or Afrikaans, but I can find no trace of Weeseur on the web that makes any sense.

Note the presence of the exciting new Cocktail Kingdom measuring jigger!

Cocktail Kingdom Japanese Style Jigger 22ml/15ml

Finally a Japanese-style jigger with a 3/4oz side (or 22ml for those of you who are metrically inclined)! Been waiting for this for quite some time.

I also know that the gentlemen of Cocktail Kingdom went to quite some trouble to find a manufacturer who could deliver an accurate 3/4 oz jigger.

In fact, when I was in New York recently, another bartender showed me how badly calibrated some of the usual bar supplies conical stainless jiggers were. Some were off by as much as 1/8 ounce when compared withe the Cocktail Kingdom Jigger.

I checked mine at home with the Cocktail Kingdom Jigger and found them not quite that far off. Whew!

The big problem now is I usually use 3 jiggers: 1/2:1, 3/4:11/2, 1:2.

Now I have to get used to using only two jiggers: 1/2:3/4 and 1:11/2.

Well, if I ever want to work in NY, I guess I’ll have to.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Victory Cocktail

Victory Cocktail
1/2 Grenadine. (1/2 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/2 Absinthe. (1/2 oz Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe)
(Juice 1/2 small Lemon, or about 1/2 oz Fresh Lemon Juice)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass, and fill with soda water (Cavas Hill Cava, what else?). (Garnish with long lemon twist, horse’s neck or shoestring.)

Right, I’m just not going to make this as written, that’s all there is to it.

1 oz Absinthe and 1 oz Grenadine diluted with soda?

Bleah.

So I decreased the amounts and added some lemon juice. Filled with Sparkling Wine and added a lemon twist.

Damn. That’s tasty. So tasty, I immediately sent the recipe to Jennifer Colliau, of Small Hand Foods, saying, “Is this a cocktail you know? If it isn’t it should be.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Ulanda Cocktail

Ulanda Cocktail
1 Dash Absinthe. (1 Dash Lucid Absinthe)
1/3 Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Martin Miller’s Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sweet, and all 80 Proof Spirits and Liqueurs, the Ulanda is a bit of a dangerous proposition.

Probably more of the “knock your date out with booze” school of drink making, like the Between the Sheets, the Ulanda doesn’t really have a lot to recommend it beyond being strong.

It looks like the word Ulanda is either someone’s first name or refers to, “an administrative ward in the Iringa Rural district of the Iringa Region of Tanzania.”  I dunno, I’m guessing maybe first name.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tuxedo Cocktail (No. 2)

Tuxedo Cocktail (No. 2)
1 Dash Maraschino. (2.5ml or 1/2 tsp Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Dash Absinthe. (2.5ml or 1/2 tsp Greenway Distiller’s Absinthe)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 Dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth or Sutton Cellars Vermouth)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add a cherry. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Interestingly, in “Barflies and Cocktails”, Harry McElhone calls for “Sir R. Burnett’s Old Tom Gin” in this cocktail.

Well, that give me an excuse to use a more interesting Gin! Yay, Ransom!

Aside from using the Ransom, this is a much more interesting cocktail, even if it is just a Martinez with French Vermouth. The Maraschino and the Orange Bitters really pump up the volume of the somewhat plain “Tuxedo No. 1″.

The Sutton vs. Noilly test was not so obvious with the Tuxedo Cocktail No. 2. I tasted the two cocktails, then put them into the fridge for Michele to taste when she got home. When we tasted them, I could tell they were different, but had a hard time deciding which was which, or which I preferred. I believe Michele even said she preferred the Sutton Cellars version this time. Basically, I think the more intense gin, bitters, liqueurs, and Absinthe just plowed the vermouth under.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Tuxedo Cocktail (No. 1)

Tuxedo Cocktail (No. 1)
1 Piece Lemon Peel. (1 Piece Lemon Peel)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (2 Dash Lucid Absinthe)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry or 1 oz Sutton Cellars)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Tanqueray Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

For two weeks I thought I probably had cancer, now I am told I probably don’t. Lucky again.

Spend a couple weeks worrying and then it is just supposed to go away. Never mind about that. “Keep Calm and Carry On.”

Doesn’t seem quite that easy to get over.

A second chance?

When my Dad had his heart attack, he viewed the life he came back to as a gift. Everything after nearly dying was a bonus.

While my situation was nowhere near that dramatic, nor as dramatic as someone who recovers from Cancer, still, it provokes some thought about the direction of your life.

The Tuxedo is a Martini with a dash of Absinthe, Period.

As such, it is a fairly enjoyable cocktail, if you enjoy Martinis and Absinthe, as I do.

Mrs. Flannestad and I again performed the Noilly vs. Sutton Cellars blind experiment and found we preferred the Noilly in the cocktail. Your Mileage may vary.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Turf Cocktail

Turf Cocktail
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 Dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (2 Dash Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (2 Dash Lucid Absinthe)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry or 1 oz Sutton Cellars Vermouth)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1/2 oz Junipero, 1/2 oz Genevieve)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I was reading a post over at Ummamimart about Perucchi Vermouth, which we sadly do not have in the Bay Area, and I noticed that Payman had mentioned Sutton Cellars Vermouth in a comment.

Later in the comment thread, Carl Sutton chimed in with some corrections.

Thinking about it, I realized I had never really given the old college try to using the Sutton Cellars Vermouth in Savoy Cocktails.

So I thought I’d pick up a fresh bottle of Sutton Cellars and a fresh bottle of Noilly Prat Dry and put them up against each other in cocktails.

The Turf Cocktail, which Robert Vermeire attributes to “Harry Johnson, New Orleans,” is actually one of my all time favorite aromatic Gin cocktails.  As usual, this is a combination of Gin and Dry Vermouth with a couple dashes of this and that.  In this case the this is Absinthe and the that is Maraschino Liqueur.  Like the Imperial Cocktail, this transforms a simple Fifty-Fifty Martini into something completely other.

Not relying on my own taste, I also ran both of these past Mrs. Flannestad in a blind tasting, even though aromatic gin cocktails are not her favorite.  The general consensus was, in the case of the Turf Cocktail, we preferred the cocktail made with Noilly Prat Dry to the one with Sutton Cellars.   While the Noilly Turf was balanced and smooth, the Sutton Cellars Turf seemed to have a tart character which overshadowed the other elements in the drink.

Didn’t hear from the specialist for a few days, so finally, two days before the Biopsy, I call the office to ask about my test results. The Doctor isn’t in, but the nurse tells me the numbers from one of the tests was “abnormal” .  I should still plan on coming in for the biopsy.

Ooof.

This was a pretty big let down. Needless to say, it put me in a pretty bad mood.

The morning of the appointment, I got ready as advised (don’t ask,) and Michele gave me a ride to the office. It was in one of the depressingly dingy San Francisco Kaiser offices, which always seem to be in some form of remodeling or another and filled with sick, or otherwise mutilated, senior citizens.

The nurse takes me to the office and tells me to take off my clothes and put on the surgical gown.

I sit in the office, mostly naked, shivering, for about 20 minutes, contemplating surgical devices which don’t look like they would have been out of place in the David Cronenberg film “Dead Ringers”. I eye the specimen jars with my name on them.

Finally, the Doctor finally comes in. He tells me they just got back some more blood results, and, in fact, my numbers are “normal”. In line with my results the year before. We don’t have to proceed with the biopsy, just keep an eye on this for the future.

Stunned and confused, I say, “Uh, What?”

“You can put your clothes back on and leave.”

“Uh, thanks. OK.”

As I’m leaving, the nurse says, “You got lucky today. I hope your numbers stay low.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Trilby Cocktail (No 2)

First, just a reminder that this Sunday, September 26, 2010, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Trilby Cocktail (No. 2)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (2 dash Lucid Absinthe)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 dash Angostura Orange)
1/3 Parfait Amour Liqueur. (3/4 oz Pages Parfait Amour)
1/3 Scotch Whisky. (3/4 oz Famous Grouse Scotch)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Wow, this is possibly THE least appealing cocktail I’ve made so far from the Savoy Cocktail Book. Not only does it taste and smell like Grandma Squeezins’, but it is also a most unappealing inky black color, as if you had spilled squid ink into a glass. Who knew Grandma had such a black heart? I can’t really think of anything to recommend it.

You know those folks who tell you to make a Martini by just looking at the vermouth bottle? They’re wrong. But believe me, you’ll be better off if you make a Trilby Cocktail (No. 2) by pouring yourself a glass of nice Scotch. Say, something like this Murray McDavid bottling from Clynelish suggested to me by Amy at Cask Store.  Then just look at a roll of Violet Candies. Preferably from across the room. Actually, I think the candies are a little dangerously close to the Scotch in this picture, chance of violet contamination. Get them this close, at your own risk.  If you’re really feeling daring, maybe make yourself a Rob Roy, just leave the violets out of it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.