Plain Vermouth Cocktail

Plain Vermouth Cocktail

Plain Vermouth Cocktail.
(6 People)
5 1/2 Glasses French Vermouth. (2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1 Teaspoonful Absinthe Bitters. (1 Dash Absinthe)
1 dessertspoonful Maraschino. (1 Dash Maraschino)
Shake (I stirred) very thoroughly and serve with a (Luxardo!) cherry.

A lot like the Chrysanthemum cocktail, this is a relatively pleasing light aperitif beverage. Or if you’re off kilter and need something in a drinking session relatively low alcohol to get you back on the path towards pleasant drunken-ness.

Again, sticking with plain old Absinthe for the “Absinthe Bitters” in this cocktail. I don’t know that breaking out the Gin and Wormwood makes much sense here.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Plain Sherry Cocktail

Plain Sherry Cocktail

Plain Sherry Cocktail.
(6 People)
Pour into the shaker 6 glasses of Sherry (Bodega Dios Baco Amontillado Sherry), a few drops of Absinthe Bitters (generous drop Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe), and a few drops of Maraschino (generous drop Luxardo Maraschino). Shake (I stirred) very thoroughly and serve.

Odd quest for Sherry this time around. I’d lately been enjoying a Lustau Dry Oloroso where sherry was called for, but that bottle was getting a bit tired, so I forced myself to finish it off.

Figured it would be a piece of cake to find a decent Amontillado or similar. Heck, I’ve been buying the Lustau Amontillado since I was in college, how hard should that be to find?

Kind of hard, it turns out. Why on earth is it most upscale grocery stores have a better sherry selection than most liquor stores? Heck, I even visited the esteemed John Walker and Co downtown and they didn’t have a single bottle of Sherry. What is up with that? Has Dominic Venegas stolen it all for Gitane?

Fine, grocery stores, then. Both Andronico’s and Tower Market’s sherry selection kicked most liquor stores’ sherry (non!) selection in the ass, anyway.

Back to the cocktail, obviously, this isn’t going to make a non-sherry drinker turn their head, but for the rest of us, here’s another nice, light aperitif cocktail for those times when the booze just seems a bit much.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pauline Cocktail

Pauline Cocktail

Pauline Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Rum. (1 1/2 oz Barbancourt White Rum)
3 Glasses Sweetened Lemon Juice. (1 oz Lemon Juice, 1/2 oz Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Dash Absinthe Bitters.  (1 Dash Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
A little Nutmeg, grated.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I tried this one both with Gin and Wormwood and plain old Absinthe. I found I preferred the regular Absinthe.

Since it doesn’t specify what type of rum to use here, and I’ve really been digging Barbancourt’s white rum lately, I chose to use it in this cocktail. Barbancourt’s rums are produced from Cane Juice so they have a bit of flavor in common with the Rhum Agricoles from Martinique and elsewhere. However, their white rum has less of the harshness and funk of the white rums from those areas.

Proves to work quite well in this Daiquiri-like cocktail.

No idea who the eponymous Pauline might have been, but I like her taste in cocktails!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lindstead Cocktail

Linstead

Linstead Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Sazerac Straight Rye)
3 Glasses Sweetened Pineapple Juice. (1 1/2 oz Knudsen Pineapple Juice)
Finish off before shaking with a dash of Absinthe Bitters. (dash Gin and Wormwood)

Shake and serve, squeezing a little lemon peel on top of each glass.

Since finding a recipe for “Wormwood Bitters” in Eddie Clarke’s “Shaking in the Sixties”, I have gone so far as to purchase two wormwood plants, grow them in my community garden plot, and infuse a small amount of gin with a few sprigs from the plants. The resulting substance is indeed very bitter, but not entirely unpleasant.

I didn’t have a lot of hope that the Linstead Cocktail would be all that tasty. I mean, Whiskey, Pineapple, and bitters, how could that even be good? But, somehow it actually is. Oddly found myself savoring and puzzling over the flavors in the cocktail. Far more interesting than those three ingredients have any real right to be.

If you don’t have your own wormwood plants or don’t want to go to the trouble of infusing gin, you could probably substitute “Gorki List” if you’ve got it around.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.