Queen Elizabeth Cocktail

Queen Elizabeth Cocktail

Queen Elizabeth Cocktail.

1 Dash Curacao (1/3 teaspoon Brizard Orange Curacao)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Osocalis Brandy)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Add 1 cherry. (Orange Peel.)

As the cocktail doesn’t call for any bittters, I cheated a bit and went with the Punt e Mes for this Queen Elizabeth Cocktail.

Nothing complicated or particularly deep, but quite tasty!

Definitely preferable to the previous Queen Elizabeth with Gin, Cointreau, Lemon, and Absinthe.

From the wikipedia, regarding the Queen:

Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until 1952 as the wife of King George VI. After her husband’s death, she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter, Queen Elizabeth II. She was the last Queen of Ireland and Empress of India.

Assuming that that is the Queen Elizabeth we are talking about here, I’m a bit surprised. It is my understanding her favorite drink was Gin and Dubonet Rouge, rocks, with a slice of lemon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Queen Elizabeth Cocktail

Queen Elizabeth Cocktail

Queen Elizabeth Cocktail.
1 Dash Absinthe. (Absinthe Verte de Fougerolles)
1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The first of two cocktails called the “Queen Elizabeth Cocktail,”I was really kind of hoping this would be a super tasty variation on the White Lady Cocktail.  Unfortunately, it takes the simple elegance of that drink and muddies it with Absinthe.  And while I think Anise and Orange are often nice flavor combinations, they just don’t work for me here.

If you are really hot and bothered about making the Queen Elizabeth Cocktail, maybe you are a white collared Elizabethan at heart, I might suggest adding an egg white and then simply dotting small drops of absinthe on the top of the drink.  Or if you stick with the egg white free version, maybe just rinse the glass with absinthe.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Queen’s Cocktail

Queen's Cocktail

Queen’s Cocktail.

1/2 Slice of Crushed Pineapple.
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin French Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
1/2 Gin. (1 1/2 oz Sarticious Gin)

(Muddle pineapple in shaker. Add ingredients and ice…) Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.
According to Robert Vermeire, this recipe was, “by Harry Craddock, New York.” Nice to get an actual verified Craddock cocktail. But wait, isn’t The Queen’s Cocktail just a slightly dried out version of The Plaza Cocktail?

In the case of the Queen’s I actually splurged and bought a fresh pineapple and muddled half a slice in the drink. Can’t say that the substitution made that much difference between them. I think possibly the fresh pineapple was slightly more flavorful and gave a bit better foam.  Both the Plaza and The Queen’s are fairly tasty, in a vaguely tropical, punch-like way.  Amazing how a couple pieces of fruit can take a cocktail a long way from being a perfect Martini!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Quarter Deck Cocktail

Quarter Deck Cocktail

Quarter Deck Cocktail.

1 Teaspoonful of Lime Juice.
1/3 Sherry. (1 1/2 oz Bodega Dios Baco Amontillado Sherry)
2/3 Rum. (1 1/2 oz Havana Club 7 year)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Boy was this just awful. Something about this combination of flavors just seemed to point up the more unfortunate mud and dirt type flavors of the Havana Club rum.

Possibly a different rum would work better? Santa Theresa and Diplomatico have nice affinities to sherry.

Havana Club 7, clearly does not. At all.

EDIT: You know, I wonder, if, like the Pegu Club, this “lime juice” shouldn’t be Rose’s.  Kinda thinking that would be better.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Quaker’s Cocktail

Quaker's Cocktail

Quaker’s Cocktail

1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)
1/3 Rum. (3/4 oz Barbancourt White Rum)
1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 Raspberry Syrup. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Monin Rapberry syrup)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This was OK, but I kind of felt like I should enjoy The Quaker Cocktail more than I did.  Maybe with a more flavorful raspberry syrup, this would have more character?

When I think of Quakers, the first thing that always comes to mind is “Simple Gifts” quoted musically and so lyrically by Aaron Copeland in his score for “Appalachian Spring”.

‘Tis the gift to be simple, ’tis the gift to be free,
‘Tis the gift to come down where we ought to be,
And when we find ourselves in the place just right,
‘Twill be in the valley of love and delight.
When true simplicity is gain’d,
To bow and to bend we shan’t be asham’d,
To turn, turn will be our delight,
Till by turning, turning we come out right.

Well, that and Richard Nixon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

BOTW–Carnegie Porter, 2004

Bar after close.

Bar top.

Empty seats.

Something, I dunno, peaceful, about being in the bar after a busy night. You’ve taken care of all your closing responsibilities and are waiting for your cab or ride. Between when the dishwashers finish and the cleaning crew shows up.

Botw.

While you’re there and contemplating the universe, or at least the small portion of it you experienced that night, you might as well have a beer, if you haven’t had a shift drink. Maybe the Carnegie (aka Pripps’) Porter? Nice stuff, vintage dated and from Sweden.

Pruneaux Cocktail

Pruneaux Cocktail

Pruneaux Cocktail
(6 People)
2 Glasses of Gin (1 oz Junipero Gin), 2 of Sherry (1 oz Bodega Dios Baco Amontillado), 1 of Syrup of Prunes (1/2 oz Prune Syrup) and 1 of strained Orange Juice (1/2 oz orange juice). Shake thoroughly in cracked ice, and serve.

Right, well, sure “Syrup of Prunes” isn’t exactly a SEXY ingredient, with its promises of regularity and high fiber content.

All the same, it’s a darn tasty sweetener! Kinda raisin-ey and complex, especially following the procedure below, this isn’t something to be laughed at.

It is a bit of an odd bird of a cocktail. Gin, Sherry, Orange Juice, and prune syrup. Actually, this cocktail, the Blues Cocktail, and the Ship Cocktail are the only three in the book that call for Prune Syrup.

Not exactly a Martinez. Complex and sorta fruity. It would be really interesting to put this in front of someone blind.

I really enjoyed it. And the prunes cooked in the syrup are delicious to eat!

*From Eddie Clarke’s Shaking in the Sixties, “Prune Syrup. Put one lb of prunes (which have been soaked in cold water for 24 hours) into a saucepan with two heaped teaspoonfuls of brown sugar, a piece of vanilla, and enough cold water to cover them. Boil until half the liquid has disappeared, then add a tumblerful of claret and simmer until the prunes are cooked. You may add a port glass of brandy to the prunes about ten minutes before removing them. Strain the contents of the saucepan and then pass the juice through muslin. When it is cool put it in a bottle and cork tightly. This syrup will keep for two to three weeks. The prunes, of course, are delicious to eat.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prohibition Cocktail

Prohibition Cocktail

Prohibition Cocktail.

1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 oz Lillet Blanc, 1 Dash Angostura)
2 Dashes Orange Juice. (1/2 teaspoon Orange Juice)
1 Dash Apricot Brandy. (1 dash Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Out of anything more interesting to use for Kina Lillet at the moment, so going with good old Lillet Blanc with a dash of Angostura Bitters.

Even without anything more interesting than Lillet Blanc, this is an enjoyable cocktail.  I can only imagine how much more tasty it would be with something like Cocchi Americano!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Princeton Cocktail

Princeton Cocktail

Princeton Cocktail.
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura)
1/3 Port Wine. (3/4 oz Ficklin Tinta Port)
2/3 Tom Gin. (1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I thought that was pretty good. A sort of variation on the Martinez with Port instead of Sweet Vermouth. Lighter and a bit more winey. However, when I posted the picture of this drink on my flickr photostream, I got an unexpected comment from Michael Dietch (A Dash of Bitters)

I love this drink, but not made in this way. In Imbibe (the book, not the mag), Dave Wondrich has a variant in which he slides the port gently down the side of the cocktail glass, instead of stirring it all together. This way, the port layers underneath the gin, and gradually mixes with the gin as you drink.

I love when others do my research for me, especially those as erudite as Mr. Dietch!

And look how pretty it is when prepared in that way!

Princeton Cocktail*

*Hijacking this photo taken by Michael’s wife.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prince’s Smile Cocktail

Prince's Smile Cocktail

Prince’s Smile Cocktail.

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/4 Calvados or Apple Brandy. (1/2 oz Groult Calvados Reserve)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Lemon Peel.

I’ve always maintained the the North Shore Distiller’s No. 6 is a great foil for apricot and lemon flavors. It does not disappoint here.

The Prince’s Smile bit like the a cross between the Dolly O’Dare and the Between the Sheets cocktails.  As fond as I am of Apple Brandy, this might even be an improvement over either one of those two classics.

To counter the sweetness of the apricot liqueur, you might want to be a tad generous with that “dash” of lemon juice.

Note the swank new Japanese Yarai mixing glass, which I ordered from Cocktail Kingdom.  Still trying to exactly get a handle on this puppy.  It seems to have an incredible amount of thermal density, which resulted in some drinks being more dilute and less cold than I wanted.  At this point, I really recommend pre-chilling this Mixing glasses, or it is going to suck a lot of cold out of your cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.