Rickey

RICKEYS.

Most Rickeys are made with the following recipe:

Use medium size glass.
1 Lump of Ice.
The Juice of 1/2 Lime of ¼ Lemon.
Then add 1 glass of any Spirit or Liqueur fancied, Whisky, Gin, Rum, Bourbon, Calvados, Caperitif, etc. Fill with Carbonated water and leave rind of Lime or Lemon in glass.

So much controversy about the Rickey.

Weird that a drink that is basically a highball (Remember! Highballs go in 8 oz glasses!) with a dash of lemon or lime is so controversial.

Anyway, I’m not going to be too thorough with this, feel free to search the Internets and draw your own conclusions.

Attempting to grok the various sources on the Internets:

In the late 1800s there was a Washington lobbyist named Colonel Joe Rickey who drank at Shoomaker’s Bar. He enjoyed his Bourbon Highballs with a bit of “healthful” lemon juice and a lemon rind garnish in the glass.

When people noticed his beverage being prepared, they would ask to have, “What Colonel Rickey is having.” Eventually this was shorted to, “I’ll have a Rickey”.

Towards the beginning of the 20th Century, as Dry Gin began to become more popular than Bourbon, people started asking for the drink with Gin. At some time around then, someone made the Rickey with lime instead of lemon. From then forward, everyone, except Colonel Rickey, who stuck with Bourbon and Lemon, began enjoying the drink with Gin and Lime.

I’ve returned to the drinks roots, and made it with Wathen’s Bourbon, lemon juice, and lemon peel.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this drink, it is bracing, tart and refreshing.

On the other hand, while I see the magic of Gin and Lime, I think I prefer my Whisk(e)y Highballs with just Bourbon and a mere splash of Soda.

You can keep the lemon and save it for your Daisies and Whiskey Sours.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Shady Grove Cooler

Shady Grove Cooler
1/2 Tablespoonful of Sugar. (1/2 Tablespoon of Rich Simple Syrup)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
(Shake and Strain.) Use long tumbler, and fill with Ginger Beer (Fever Tree Ginger Beer).

The Gin Based predecessor to the Moscow Mule: Vodka, Lime and Ginger Beer?

Why is this a “Cooler” and that a “Mule”?

Well, as far as the Savoy Cocktail Book is concerned, the popular category of drinks we now call the Mule, (long drinks with citrus and Ginger Beer,) doesn’t really exist. Most of them are their own singularly named drinks, or they are “Coolers”.

So I suppose if you were putting this on a menu these days, you’d call it a Gin Mule instead of a Shady Grove Cooler. Of course, if you add Mint you’ve got something similar to Marco Dionysos’ Ginger Rogers or Audrey Saunders’ Gin Gin Mule.

Though I have a certain fondness for the name Shady Grove Cooler, perhaps due to its similarity to the name of a Pavement song.

Well, in any case, it’s a refreshing drink, a great song, and another section of the Savoy Cocktail Book done. On to the Rickey.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Sea Breeze Cooler

Sea Breeze Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1 very small Lemon)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/2 Apricot Brandy. (1 oz Brizard ‘Apry’ Apricot Liqueur)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No 6 Gin)
1 Lump of ice.
Use long tumbler and fill with soda Water. 2 sprigs fresh mint on top.

Usually, the modern Sea Breeze, which I associate with the 1970s for some reason, is made up of Vodka, Cranberry Juice, and Grapefruit, shaken and served on the rocks with a lime wedge garnish.

Well, this ain’t that drink, and I am unclear if there is any causal relationship between the two.

On the other hand, though the Sea Breeze Cooler is fairly mild, I actually quite enjoyed it. It is slightly girly with that name and the pinkness, but on a hot day it seems like it would be refreshing.

I chose the North Shore No. 6, as it has on many occasions proven to be friendly to citrus and apricot. It did not disappoint.

I did throw a few of the stripped mint leaves into the drink when I shook it. Then I did not strain it through a fine sieve, which was a serious error. You can now see a fine layer of pulverized mint leaves floating on top of the drink, just waiting to get stuck between your date’s teeth. Never good.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Remsen Cooler

Remsen Cooler
l Glass Dry Gin.
1 Split of Soda.
Peel rind of lemon in spiral form, place in long tumbler with 1 lump of Ice, add Gin and fill with soda water.

The Remsen Cooler is about the only of these Coolers to have survived over the years, but there is still some confusion. The drink came to be made frequently with Gin, but some maintain it is properly made with Scotch.

Cocktail Bill Boothby relates the following in his 1906 version of his bar book. It is a nice story. Note, Old Tom Cordial Gin was a type of sweetened Old Tom Gin which apparently was available for a brief few years around 1900.

“Some years ago, the late William Remsen, a retired naval officer and a popular member of the Union Club, N.Y., introduced a beverage to the members of that swell organization which has since taken his name and is now known to all clubmen by the appellation of Remsen cooler.”

“Pare a lemon (a lime will not answer the purpose) as you would an apple, so that the peel will resemble a corkscrew, place the rind in a long thin glass and pour over it a jigger of Old Tom cordial gin; with a bar-spoon now press the peel and stir it thoroughly, so the liquor will be well flavoured with the essence of the skin and fill the glass with plain soda off the ice. English club soda is highly recommended for this drink. Be sure the soda is cold.”

Hugo Ensslin, in his 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” takes a middle path, by allowing either Gin or Scotch:

Remsen Cooler
1 drink Dry Gin or Scotch Whiskey;
1 Lemon;
1 bottle Club Soda.

Peel off rind of lemon in spiral form, place in Collins glass with cube of ice, add Gin or Scotch and fill up with Club Soda.

Well, if you can use Gin OR Whisky in a drink recipe, why not use something in between? Say Dutch Genever?

Remsen Cooler
2 oz Bols Aged Genever*.
1 Split of Soda.
Peel rind of lemon in spiral form, place in long tumbler with 1 lump of Ice, add Genever and fill with soda water.

A couple years ago, Bols brought a 19th Century style Genever to America. Based on a recipe from 1820 it soon became the darling of many bartenders. However, they weren’t quite sure what would happen with it in cocktails. There are not a ton of cocktail recipes for Genever. Would people try to mix it like Dry Gin?

What they found, especially with a lot of stumping from cocktail and punch classicists like David Wondrich, was that people were mixing with it like it was Whiskey. Making Improved Holland Gin Cocktails, Sazeracs, Holland Sours, and the odd Holland House Cocktail.

So if people were mixing with it like it was a Whiskey, what if Bols introduced the category of Genever which was even more like Whiskey, Aged Genever?

From Instant Upload

I was lucky enough to attend an event where they launched the new product in San Francisco and introduced it to us in a couple drinks.

Aged a minimum of 18 months in used and new Cognac casks, Bols Barrel Aged Genever is in interesting contrast to the original Bols 1820 recipe. While it doesn’t seem to take anything away from the 1820, the aging and slightly different production process seems to heighten the spicy characteristics of the Genever. To me, the Juniper is even clearer in the Barrel Aged Genever than it is in the rather mildly flavored unaged 1820 Genever.

They had us try it in several drinks including a Collins and a Manhattan, but to me the real winner was the Barrel Aged Genever in a julep. I’ve made and enjoyed Genever Juleps before, but the spice and intensity of the Barrel Aged Genever made it stand out in the drink and really complement the flavor of the mint.

For what it’s worth, it’s not bad in an even simpler drink, The Remsen Cooler. On the ice or off the ice, little simple syrup wouldn’t hurt this drink, but note that none of the recipes include any juice at all, only lemon peel.

*The Bols Aged Genever used in this post was provided to me by a firm promoting the brand.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Moonlight Cooler

Moonlight Cooler
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Rich Simple Syrup to taste)
The Juice of 1 Lemon. (Juice 1 Lime)
1 Glass Calvados. (2 oz Calvados Montreuil)
Shake well and strain into long tumbler. Fill with soda water and decorate with slices of fruit in season.

You may recognize this formulation from the Harvard Cooler, from which it differs only in the recommendation to “decorate with slices of fruit in season” and the fact that it specifically calls for Calvados, not “Calvados or Applejack”.

Not that I’m complaining, I really like this drink. It’s really fun to tweak the balance of tart, sour, and dilution so it falls just about where hard cider would fall.

If you get it just right, I think a lot of people, especially if you’re making it with Calvados, would have a hard time telling it from the real thing.

And if you’re a Apple fan, like myself, that is a very good thing.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Mint Cooler

First, just a reminder that Sunday, September 25, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Mint Cooler
1 Glass Scotch Whisky. (2 oz 40 Creek 3 Grain Canadian Whisky)
3 Dashes Crème de Menthe. (1 teaspoon Brizard Creme de Menthe)
Use tumbler. 1 lump of Ice and fill with soda water.

Sorry, I don’t have any cheap blended Scotch in the house, and I couldn’t bring myself to make this with Single Malt.

So I made it with Canadian “Whisky” instead. Hey! At least they spell it the same.

It’s kind of like a Whisky Stinger, which, I guess, isn’t exactly a bad thing. At least the creator of the drink was somewhat stingy with the Creme de Menthe.

Still, it tastes kind of like kissing someone who was trying to cover their long afternoon at the distillery tasting room by brushing their teeth.

Kind of cute, but I prefer the straight whisky flavor. You don’t have to lie to me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Manhattan Cooler

Manhattan Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (dash Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Wineglass Claret. (2 oz Smith and Woodehouse Late Bottled Vintage Port)
3 Dashes Rum. (1 teaspoon Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass. Decorate with fruit in season.

Didn’t have any French Wine in the house, so substituted Port and reduced the sweetener. Figured I should use a Rum with some spine, as it was in such a small amount. Just built it over a cube of ice, since the port was already chilled and added a splash of soda. Fresh out of fruit at the moment.

Then I thought to check Hugo Ensslin, for his take on the Manhattan Cooler…

Manhattan Cooler

Juice of 1 Lime
1/2 spoonful of Powdered Sugar
1 wine glass of Claret
3 dashes of St. Croix Rum

Stir well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, pour into a stem glass, decorate with fruit and serve with straws.

First, I do think it’s kind of funny that the only actual “Wine Cooler” in this section is named the “Manhattan Cooler”, what with New Yorkers’ near obsessive insistence on overproof spirits and ridiculously large and potent drinks.

The use of St. Croix Rum is a bit interesting. As you may recall, Martin Cate had once told me he felt using a Spiced Rum where St. Croix Rum is called for provides more interest than actual St. Croix Rum.

However, I have yet to meet a spiced rum I particularly care for. But, wait, isn’t Allspice Dram, well, spiced rum?

2 oz Bordeaux Wine
1/2 Tablespoon Allspice Dram
1 Tablespoon Rich Simple Syrup
Juice 1 Lime

Shake and strain into a tall-ish glass, uh, wait, there’s no soda in this Cooler nor is it served in a tall glass!

Well, I did add a splash of soda to my adaption and to be honest, kind of enjoyed it. Not that I think it would fly in the Manhattan of today.

About the only way I could see them drinking this there would be if you reversed the proportions, maybe 4 oz of navy strength rum, swizzled, with lime and a float of wine.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Long Tom Cooler

Long Tom Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Sugar. (1/2 Tablespoon of Rich Simple Syrup, or to taste)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
(dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
Shake well, strain into long tumbler, add 1 lump of ice, and fill with soda water.

Again, the Savoy editors did not do a particularly good job of translating a recipe from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”:

Long Tom Cooler.
1 pony Sugar Syrup;
Juice of ½ Lemon;
1 drink El Bart Gin.
Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into a Collins glass, add a cube of ice and 1 slice of Orange, fill up with Club Soda.

And again, moronically, I failed to look at Ensslin’s book before making the drink, or this would have looked a bit different.

Anyway, the other Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, a friend asked me for a drink that was “not too alcoholic”, and this sprung immediately to mind. Basically a dry-ish lemonade with a generous pour of soda and a splash of gin, this is a very refreshing and mild hot weather drink.

However, there may be a slight problem with serving a drink called “Long Tom” to a male customer. My advice? Don’t do it, unless you’re sure your gesture won’t be misinterpreted.

And, yes, there is basically no difference between a Long Tom Cooler and a Tom Collins, maybe the Long Tom is a bit sweeter? Anyway, for the record, while there are many similar drinks to the Tom Collins in Ensslin’s book, he does not specifically include instructions for making one.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Lone Tree Cooler

Lone Tree Cooler
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
The Juice of 1 Orange. (Juice 1 orange)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
1 Liqueur Glass Grenadine. (1 oz Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
(2 dash Absinthe Verte)
Shake well strain into tumbler and fill with soda water.

I dunno, I just felt like a little Absinthe would add some interest to this rather odd recipe. Vermouth in a Cooler? Juice of 1 Orange? Anyway, it’s another cocktail where I wish I had cracked a book and done some research before making it…

As usual, the theoretical source for this recipe was Hugo Ensslin’s 1916, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”.

However, Hugo’s recipe is hugely different:

Lone Tree Cooler
Juice of 1 Lemon;
Juice of ¼ Orange;
Pony Grenadine.

Made and served same as Apricot Cooler.

Righto. Well, there you go, cough, no booze at all, that’s way too brazen to be a typo. I guess whomever wrote the Savoy Cocktail Book felt the Lone Tree Cooler was good, but needed a little something to juice it up, like Gin and Dry Vermouth. Of course, then I came along and felt like it needed even a little more electricity, a la Maurice, and added Absinthe.

It is a wonder the same drink gets made the same way in more than once!

Ha! Sometimes I wonder if the same drink IS ever made more than once!

Well, if you’re looking for a non-alcoholic drink, you could certainly do worse than this lemonade sweetened with Grenadine, or, alternatively, slightly tarted up Shirley Temple.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Highland Cooler

Highland Cooler
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (Er, I, uh forgot the sugar.)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters. (dash Dr. Elmegirab’s Boker’s Bitters)
1 Glass Scotch Whisky. (2 oz Highland Park 8, The Machphail’s Collection)
1 Lump of Ice.
Use long tumbler and fill with Ginger Ale (Err, Soda).

The first time I made this, I didn’t read the recipe very closely, forgot the sugar, and filled the drink with soda instead of Ginger Ale.

I kind of liked it. I was surprised how much “sweet” character comes from the Highland Park alone. A dash or two more of simple and this was really good.

I also didn’t have any Ginger Ale or Beer in the house at the time, so a redo would have to wait for another day.

Highland Cooler
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp Rich Simple Syrup)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters. (dash Angostura Bitters)
1 Glass Scotch Whisky. (2 oz The MacAllan Cask Strength)
1 Lump of Ice.
Use long tumbler and fill with Ginger Ale (Bruce Cost’s Ginger Beer).

The second time, a couple days later, I managed to get everything in the drink. Of course, by this time, I had also remembered the Mamie Taylor, which is pretty much exactly the same drink, with lime instead of Lemon.

Both are good, but I kind of enjoyed the soda version a little more, it is a better feature for the Scotch Whisky, if you are using something nice. It also could be just due to the fact that I prefer the Highland Park 8 to the MacAllan Cask Strength.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.