Savoy Hotel Rickey

Savoy Hotel Rickey
Use medium size glass.
1 Lump of Ice.
The Juice of 1/2 Lime or 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz North Shore No 6)
4 Dashes Grenadine. (1 Teaspoon of Small hand Foods Grenadine)
Fill with Carbonated Water and leave Rind of Lime or Lemon in glass.

A Gin Rickey, slightly enpinkened, the Savoy Hotel Rickey isn’t anything particularly fancy.

On the other hand, it is really easy to make and quite refreshing.

A good drink for lazy summer afternoons, when actually shaking something is a little too much effort. Build it over the ice, give it a stir or two. Top up with soda and you’re done.

Hard to beat!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Rickey

RICKEYS.

Most Rickeys are made with the following recipe:

Use medium size glass.
1 Lump of Ice.
The Juice of 1/2 Lime of ΒΌ Lemon.
Then add 1 glass of any Spirit or Liqueur fancied, Whisky, Gin, Rum, Bourbon, Calvados, Caperitif, etc. Fill with Carbonated water and leave rind of Lime or Lemon in glass.

So much controversy about the Rickey.

Weird that a drink that is basically a highball (Remember! Highballs go in 8 oz glasses!) with a dash of lemon or lime is so controversial.

Anyway, I’m not going to be too thorough with this, feel free to search the Internets and draw your own conclusions.

Attempting to grok the various sources on the Internets:

In the late 1800s there was a Washington lobbyist named Colonel Joe Rickey who drank at Shoomaker’s Bar. He enjoyed his Bourbon Highballs with a bit of “healthful” lemon juice and a lemon rind garnish in the glass.

When people noticed his beverage being prepared, they would ask to have, “What Colonel Rickey is having.” Eventually this was shorted to, “I’ll have a Rickey”.

Towards the beginning of the 20th Century, as Dry Gin began to become more popular than Bourbon, people started asking for the drink with Gin. At some time around then, someone made the Rickey with lime instead of lemon. From then forward, everyone, except Colonel Rickey, who stuck with Bourbon and Lemon, began enjoying the drink with Gin and Lime.

I’ve returned to the drinks roots, and made it with Wathen’s Bourbon, lemon juice, and lemon peel.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this drink, it is bracing, tart and refreshing.

On the other hand, while I see the magic of Gin and Lime, I think I prefer my Whisk(e)y Highballs with just Bourbon and a mere splash of Soda.

You can keep the lemon and save it for your Daisies and Whiskey Sours.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

WOTW–Gypsy Boots

Romano Beans Roasted with Maitake Mushrooms, Garlic and Herbs.

Steelhead, ready to be topped with sauteed aromatic vegetables.

“I am trying to be patient with your shenanigans.”

Lighting the Candle.

When the beans and mushrooms were roasting, I added some Early Girl tomatoes from Two Dog Farms on top of them. Then I tossed them both with Frisee, sort of a vegetarian variation on the normal warm french salad. I was on the fence about adding cheese, but a poached egg would have been really nice. Still, a very tasty salad.

Souvenir from our last trip to New Orleans.

Michele was taken in by Winfred Wong’s glowing writeup of this wine on the BevMo shelf and the back label. “One travels the world over in search of what one needs and returns home to find it…the Sonoma Coast.” As much as I appreciate the sentiment, and as much as I do like the Sonoma Coast, Gypsy Boots’ Pinot Noir was really not very good. Barely above “plonk” level. At least it was not expensive.

“No, really, I am being very, very patient with your goofiness, and I would like some fish, please.”

Steelhead braised with aromatic vegetables, quinoa pilaf.

Shady Grove Cooler

Shady Grove Cooler
1/2 Tablespoonful of Sugar. (1/2 Tablespoon of Rich Simple Syrup)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
(Shake and Strain.) Use long tumbler, and fill with Ginger Beer (Fever Tree Ginger Beer).

The Gin Based predecessor to the Moscow Mule: Vodka, Lime and Ginger Beer?

Why is this a “Cooler” and that a “Mule”?

Well, as far as the Savoy Cocktail Book is concerned, the popular category of drinks we now call the Mule, (long drinks with citrus and Ginger Beer,) doesn’t really exist. Most of them are their own singularly named drinks, or they are “Coolers”.

So I suppose if you were putting this on a menu these days, you’d call it a Gin Mule instead of a Shady Grove Cooler. Of course, if you add Mint you’ve got something similar to Marco Dionysos’ Ginger Rogers or Audrey Saunders’ Gin Gin Mule.

Though I have a certain fondness for the name Shady Grove Cooler, perhaps due to its similarity to the name of a Pavement song.

Well, in any case, it’s a refreshing drink, a great song, and another section of the Savoy Cocktail Book done. On to the Rickey.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Sea Breeze Cooler

Sea Breeze Cooler
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1 very small Lemon)
2 Dashes Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Small Hand Foods Grenadine)
1/2 Apricot Brandy. (1 oz Brizard ‘Apry’ Apricot Liqueur)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No 6 Gin)
1 Lump of ice.
Use long tumbler and fill with soda Water. 2 sprigs fresh mint on top.

Usually, the modern Sea Breeze, which I associate with the 1970s for some reason, is made up of Vodka, Cranberry Juice, and Grapefruit, shaken and served on the rocks with a lime wedge garnish.

Well, this ain’t that drink, and I am unclear if there is any causal relationship between the two.

On the other hand, though the Sea Breeze Cooler is fairly mild, I actually quite enjoyed it. It is slightly girly with that name and the pinkness, but on a hot day it seems like it would be refreshing.

I chose the North Shore No. 6, as it has on many occasions proven to be friendly to citrus and apricot. It did not disappoint.

I did throw a few of the stripped mint leaves into the drink when I shook it. Then I did not strain it through a fine sieve, which was a serious error. You can now see a fine layer of pulverized mint leaves floating on top of the drink, just waiting to get stuck between your date’s teeth. Never good.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Ambivalence

After a dry Mekons concert at the Swedish American Hall, could have used a drink.

Close to Churchill, maybe I can stop in and say “Hi” to Karly or Trevor.

The long line of young people waiting to get in, nixed that idea.

Wait, what the!? What is that the young people are wearing on their heads?

What I can only describe as “Balloon Animal Crowns”!

It doesn’t even look like a Hen Party. I guess I need to get out a little more at night…

Is it normal to be relieved I don’t have to deal with these sort of people where I work and at the same time, a little jealous?