Texas Fizz

Texas Fizz
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/2 Tangerine)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lime)
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous teaspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz North Shore Distiller’s Gin No. 6)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

I am not quite sure why exactly this is a “Texas” Fizz. I guess they do grow a fair amount of citrus there, though I more strongly associate them with Grapefruit.

I massaged it a bit, using the juice of half a Tangerine and half a lime, instead of the 1/4 Lemon and 1/4 Orange it calls for. Ended up pretty tasty.

When I started making these I was still using water from a Britta Pitcher and often found the ice had off flavors. We recently invested in a new more effective filter which attaches to the faucet. The ice is way better. It’s funny, you generally think of cocktails as having fairly big flavors, a little off flavor from the ice isn’t going to ruin anything. Most modern, over driven cocktails probably fall into that category, there’s so much going on you probably wouldn’t notice some off flavor from the ice. On the other hand, with a four ingredient, fairly subtle drink like this and these fizzes, any off flavors from ice, or anything else, are right up there in front.

The easiest way I’ve ever found to find out what your ice tastes like is to pour a few ounces of cold water into your cocktail shaker. Add ice. Shake and strain it into a glass just as if you were making a cocktail. Does the chilled water taste good? If it doesn’t, that same ice isn’t going to be contributing anything good to your cocktails either.

So how about the Texas Fizz?

It’s kind of good, refreshing and light. It’s not a mind blowing cocktail, but it’s also not blowing out your taste buds with your first sip. You drink it and think, “That was nice, what’s next?”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

One thought on “Texas Fizz

  1. the new issue of Imbibe! has a great historical piece on the Taxas Fizz, from David Wondrich in his “Old Fashioned” column. In 1936, Ritz Hotel bartender Frank Meier kicked the Texas Fizz up a notch by swapping out the seltzer for champagne, genius! I plan to try one after work today at my local.

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