Grand Royal Fizz

Grand Royal Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Uh, ooops, forgot)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (1 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/4 Orange)
1 Tablespoonful Sweet Cream. (1/4 oz Heavy Cream)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Another recipe from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917, he gives the recipe as, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding: 1 dash Maraschino; 3 dashes Orange Juice; ½ pony Cream.”

Again, Mr. Ensslin’s recipe for the Gin Fizz is as follows:

Gin Fizz
Juice of ½ Lime;
Juice ½ Lemon;
1 tablespoon of Powdered Sugar;
1 drink Dry Gin.

Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.

OK, I forgot the extra “Powdered Sugar”. Oops. Anyway, this was nicely tart without the extra sweetener. I take back my previous comment about tasting like Yoghurt being a bad thing.

Anyway, this is kind of like a Ramos (aka New Orleans) Fizz without the Egg White and with Maraschino Liqueur instead of Orange Flower Water. To be honest, I’m not sure any of those things are exactly bad. While Luxardo Maraschino is a little finicky, it’s nowhere near the problem ingredient that Orange Flower Water can be. Even with the Cream, Mrs. Flannestad approved of the Grand Royal Fizz.

Though the last time we did a “Grand Royal” drink, it was the “Grand Royal Clover Club” (Made by Ms. Josey Packard at Alembic Bar way back in April of 2008!) and it included a whole egg, not cream. Savoy Cocktail Book, inconsistent as ever.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

MxMo LIX: Industrial Pale Fizz

MxMo LIX: Beer!

While beer being used as an ingredient in modern cocktails has gotten a lot of press as of late, this is not a new trend. Beer has played a historical role in mixed drinks for centuries. For example, it can be found in Colonial drinks like the Rumfustian, Porter Sangaree, and Ale Flip. While many of these drinks are not seen in modern bars save for craft cocktail establishments, other beer drinks are though, including the Boilermaker, Black Velvet, and Michelada. And present day mixologists are utilizing beer with great success including Kelly Slagle’s Port of Funchal, Jacob Grier’s Averna Stout Flip, and Emma Hollander’s Word to Your Mom. Bartenders are drawn to beer for a variety of reasons including the glorious malt and roast notes from the grain, the bitter and sometimes floral elements from the hops, the interesting sour or fruity notes from the yeast, and the crispness and bubbles from the carbonation. Beer is not just for pint glasses, so let us honor beer of all styles as a drink ingredient.

When I heard about this month’s Mixology Monday, it sort of put me off. To be honest, I’m not much into “Beer Cocktails”, as to me beer is already pretty much a perfect beverage.

However, when I was thinking more about it…

The two main impetus for distillation were to first preserve fermented beverages from spoiling and second to reduce the volume.

Usually, you talk about these things with regard to how much beer the English Royal Navy or other expeditions had to bring along to satiate their crews and passengers. As in, many people speculate the real reason the pilgrims decided on Plymouth Rock wasn’t so much choice, as they had run out of beer and needed to get to land for provisions to make more. If they ran out of alcoholic beverages for long on ship, they would be facing a mutiny.

So with Punch, what you were doing was, essentially, re-adding to the distilled spirits, what had been lost in the process of distillation: fruit flavor, sweetness, and water.

OK, that is easy to do with Brandy, distilled from fruit, but what about spirits distilled from grain?

How do you turn whiskey back into beer?

Here’s my idea:

A Silver Fizz made with hop infused white dog sweetened with barley syrup.

Hop infused Whiskey

1/4 cup well toasted rye or barley
1 Cup Unaged Whiskey
1 Tablespoon Hops

Add toasted grain to whiskey, let stand to infuse 2 days. On the second day add the hops and let stand another day. Filter out solids and bottle.

Industrial Pale Fizz

2 oz Hop Infused Whiskey
1 Teaspoon Barley Syrup
1 Egg White
Soda Water

Add Whiskey, Syrup, and Egg White to mixing tin. Dry Shake to emulsify. Add ice and shake well. Strain into a Fizz Glass and top with Soda Water.

The question I have, though, is citrus.

The balance of beer is pretty much entirely between bitter and sweet flavors, most often without sour. Do we want to introduce citrus to the drink to make it a Lambic Fizz?

Unfortunately, I didn’t get this much beyond the conceptual stage by the deadline for the MxMo. Stay tuned this week for more details regarding the cocktail.

Golden Fizz

Golden Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon, Juice 1/2 Lime)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (2 tsp Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
The Yolk of 1 Egg. (1 Farm Fresh Egg Yolk)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

As with most of the Fizzes, the Savoy Cocktail Book editors probably got the recipe for the Golden Fizz from Hugo Ensslin’s 1916 “Recipes for Mixed Drinks”. In his book, Ensslin gives the recipe as, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz, adding the yolk of an egg.”

Here’s Ensslin’s recipe for the Gin Fizz from the Cocktail Kingdom reprint:

Gin Fizz
Juice of ½ Lime;
Juice ½ Lemon;
1 tablespoon of Powdered Sugar;
1 drink Dry Gin.

Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.

The interesting thing about Ensslin’s recipe for the “Plain Gin Fizz” is that he uses both Lemon and Lime in the drink! Well, interesting is, I suppose, relative, but the additional tart citrus does make the sugar amounts and dilution in the Fizz recipes a bit more sensible.

Anyway, I’ve been ignoring the lemon-lime combo information up until now, (I was out of limes,) but I thought it was finally time to put it into play with the Golden Fizz.

When I mentioned this to someone they said, “Are you kidding, that’s Sour Mix!” Well, it’s not really, it’s just that Lemons and Limes bring different things to the party. Lemons are more sour, limes are more bitter and aromatic. Put them together, especially with Gin, and you get a sum greater than the parts!

You give it a try some time with a Sour or Fizz and let me know if you don’t think it elevates a somewhat plain drink.

As we discussed in the Gin Fizz post, when you add Egg White to a Fizz, you get a Silver Fizz. When you add Egg Yolk you, naturally, get a Golden Fizz. Richer, fuller, more unctuous. Not an every day refreshing fizz, to be sure, but a satisfying beverage of a different sort.

Music in the video is from the Lean Left Album, “The Ex Guitars meet Nilssen-Love/Vandermark Duo, Vol. 2″.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Gin Fizz

Gin Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (generous teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

A while ago, my neighborhood blog Bernalwood was kind enough to feature one of my cocktail posts:

This Weekend’s Coktail is yesterday’s Tom Collins

In the comments section, someone remarked:

friscolex: “Hurray for good cocktails. I have to fight tooth and nail to get a gin fizz in SF so maybe I’ll just switch, although the Rob Roy IMO is the Perfect Manhattan.
In re: gin fizz dearth: I have tried EVERY schmancy cocktail joint and have basically given up because I inevitably get “schooled” by the bartender who gives me a Ramos fizz or silver fizz. I’ve stopped short of printing out a few copies of the recipes from a classic cocktail book because that just seems ridiculous. Luckily those bars usually have Anchor on tap!”

It’s always sort of interesting when a certain style of drink comes to represent a category and optional ingredients become de rigueur. How did muddled fruit end up in an old fashioned? Egg White in a Whisk(e)y Sour? And to the point, “How did Egg White end up the default in the Gin Fizz?”

So let’s get this out of the way, a properly made Plain Gin Fizz does not have egg white. A “Plain Gin Fizz” is Gin, Lemon Juice (maybe lime juice), Sugar, and Soda Water. If you add egg white to a fizz, you are making what is called a Silver Fizz.

A lot of people like egg white in their Gin Fizzes, and, as indicated above, some don’t.

But let’s face it, no one can know everything about drinks. But in this case, the customer seems to know more about Gin Fizzes than the bartender. But, even if the bartender was right about the default Gin Fizz having Egg White, it’s up to him (or her) to serve the customer the drink they want, not the drink the bartender likes to make. I mean, if all I did was serve drinks I like, everyone would get Beer, Manhattans, or a Slug of Booze. What fun would that be?

What I like to do, unless a drink is written on the menu as containing Egg White, is to make sure that the customer wants their Gin Fizz (or Whiskey Sour) with Egg White when they order the drink. Say something like, “The house Gin Fizz is made with Egg White, is that all right with you?” Just to be on the safe side. Alternatively, as a customer, you should be able to ask for a, “Plain Gin Fizz, no Egg White.” If you get hassled for that order, definitely stick with the Anchor Steam.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

BOTW–Mischief

The Bruery Mischief

Mischief is a Hoppy Belgian-Style Golden Strong Ale. This wickedly good golden ale is fiendishly dry-hopped with American hops to add a layer of complexity and mystery to its fruity, dry Belgian-style character. Citrus and resin diabolically combine with ripe melon, pear and slight peppery spice in a precariously effervescent mixture. Enjoy it, but you’ll want to keep an eye out.

ABV: 8.5%
IBU: 35
SRM 5

Of the hopped Belgian-style ales we’ve tried lately, Mischief stood out for its subtle use of hops and not too sweet character. While not as dry as the Thiriez Extra, this is a pleasant American take on the Belgian style. I’d definitely buy this one again.

Chopped squash.

Israeli Couscous!

Asparagus for roasting.

“Will any of that Pancetta fall on the floor perchance?” Monty asks.

Sauteing the veggies for the Couscous dish.

This dinner was a little schizo: Jerk seasoned roast pork tenderloin. Israeli Couscous with pancetta and kabocha squash. Roast asparagus with tarragon and lemon.

Seems unlikely, but somehow it worked. The Joseph Swann Zinfandel even worked as a pairing. Strange.

Dubonnet Fizz

Dubonnet Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Orange. (Juice 1/2 Orange)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
1 Teaspoonful Cherry Brandy. (teaspoon Cherry Heering)
1 Glass Dubonnet. (2 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
(Dash Miracle Mile Sour Cherry Bitters)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass. Fill with soda water.

Never a huge fan of Dubonnet Rouge, I was pleasantly surprised by how tasty this Fizz was, Mrs. Flannestad even approved, “Tastes like sour cherry soda! Yum!” A surprisingly tasty “low alcohol” libation.

About all I’d say is give it a pretty short shake. You’re already dealing with a low alcohol base and adding soda. There’s no reason to go all “hard shake” on this one.

I was thinking what a tasty addition Bar Agricole’s Stone Fruit Bitters were to their Tom Collins. If they can add bitters to a Collins, maybe I can add something similar to the Dubonnet Fizz. A friend of mine sent me these delicious Miracle Mile Sour Cherry Bitters. Seemed just the ticket! If you don’t have the Miracle Mile Sour Cherry Bitters at home, a dash of orange bitters instead, wouldn’t hurt.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Derby Fizz

Derby Fizz
5 Dashes Lemon Juice. (Generous squeeze Lemon Juice)
1 Teaspoonful of Powdered Sugar. (1 teaspoon of Caster Sugar)
1 Egg.
1 Glass Canadian Club or Scotch Whisky. (2 oz Highland Park 8 Year, the MacPhail’s Collection)
3 Dashes Curacao. (1 teaspoon Clement Creole Shrubb)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

Clearly, I am going to catch Scotch whisky nerd hell for making this drink with the 8 year Highland Park Whisky from The MacPhail’s Collection. However, the only blended Scotch whisky I have is the Famous Grouse, and, as far as I can tell, you might as well use vodka as Famous Grouse.

Anyway, this is the youngest Single Malt I have in the house, and not a particularly expensive dram, either. But I do like it. It has a lot of the same character as the Highland Park 12, but with a little less polish and a lot more youthful vigor. I usually drink it with some water, as it is, so a cocktail didn’t seem like much of a stretch.

I have to admit, though, I’m on the fence whether the Highland Park was wasted in the Derby Fizz. Definitely, with a whole egg and soda water, any less assertive Scotch wouldn’t have had much impact at all.

Also, this is not a particularly sour Fizz, basically April’s Egg Sour with a splash of soda, and, as such, I think that serves featuring the whiskey well.

Still, the drink ends up being a little rich for my taste, at least for early evening drinking. Though, it might be a way to get your protein at Breakfast without having to choke down some god awful over-cheesed omelet and mushy hash browns. Cup of coffee on the side and you’ve got a nice peaty, smoky liquid Brunch. Just be glad I didn’t garnish the Derby Fizz with a strip of bacon…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.