Cream Fizz

Cream Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1 Teaspoonful Fresh Cream. (1 teaspoonful Whipping Cream)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

Still mucking about with the iSi CO2 soda siphon. Just haven’t figured out anything better.

I tried calling and emailing Selzer Sisters a couple weeks ago, and even though I see their delivery van in Bernal Heights every night, I haven’t heard back.

A lot of friends have recommended the Soda Stream option, but it’s a bit expensive, and I don’t like the fact that the closure is a screw top instead of a valve. Once you open, you’re pretty much committed to drinking the whole liter of soda.

Another option would be buying a case of Fever Tree Soda Water. Except I haven’t found anyone selling the Fever Tree Soda Water, just their Ginger Ale, Ginger Beer, Tonic, and Bitter Lemon. And I am certainly not going to pay to have fizzy water shipped from somewhere.

So, iSi soda siphon it is. I get decent results by a) using chilled and filtered water. b) allowing it to stand overnight after charging.

On the previous Brandy Fizz and here on the Cream Fizz, I went a little light on the sugar. I am coming to the conclusion, with the dilution and slight acidity of the soda water, you really can’t do that and have the drink have a full flavor. It just tastes like watery lemonade, not appealing.

Anyway, Cream in this one, instead of egg. There are a few fizzes like that, including the upcoming Peach Blow Fizz, not sure what the appeal is. It’s not a whole lot of cream, only a teaspoon, so it’s not like having a Milk Punch or anything. But it does foam slightly and give a dairy flavor to the drink. With the lemon, it’s almost yoghurt-ish. Again, another reason not to go light on the sugar, better custard than yoghurt.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Buck’s Fizz

As usual, I got home and did the prep for this evening’s dinner. This time, arborio rice with fresh porcini mushroom and smoked salmon.

Soak dry mushrooms. Brunoise of carrots and onions. Washed and sliced leeks. Sliced fresh porcini. Drain Mushrooms, reserving soaking liquid. Mince dried mushrooms. Crumble smoked salmon. Chop fresh herbs.

After getting that in the can, I filmed the week’s cocktail, the Buck’s Fizz.

Bucks Fizz
Use long tumbler.
1/4 Glass Orange Juice.
Fill with Champagne.

My plan was to:

Rinse glass with Miracle Mile Orange Bitters, pour bitters into mixing glass.

Make Buck’s Fizz in bitters rinsed glass.

Then make a real drink with orange bitters, like a Martini… Oh crap, I have no Dry Vermouth.

Well, make the unjustly ignored Jabberwock Cocktail instead, since I have Gin, Sherry, and Cocchi Americano.

Jabberwock Cocktail*
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Miracle Mile Orange Bitters)
1/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
1/3 Dry Sherry. (3/4 oz Manzanilla Sherry)
1/3 Caperitif. (3/4 oz Cocchi Americano or Lillet Blanc)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon (er, orange) peel on top.
* This will made you gyre and gamble in the wabe until brillig all right, all right.

So, Buck’s Fizz. Isn’t that just a Mimosa? Well, sometimes you’ll see Buck’s Fizz variations which include Cherry Heering, Orange Liqueur, Gin, or Grenadine and most Mimosas are equal parts orange juice and champagne, but, yep, at it’s most basic, The Buck’s Fizz is a fairly dry version of the Mimosa. Or the Mimosa is a Orange Juice heavy Buck’s Fizz.

Is there anything wrong with spiking your champagne with a little Vitamin C?

Always a mess. Clean up, upload photos and video.

Make the dressing for the tomato salad. Slice Tomatoes. Wash greens.

Put reserved mushroom soaking liquid over low heat and add additional chicken or vegetable stock. Heat 2 saute pans. In one large enough to hold your rice dish, add oil and 1 cup arborio rice. Heat until toasted and fragrant. Add carrot and onion brunoise, toss and cook until tender. Add chicken stock and cook until rice is nearly tender, adding more stock as necessary. While this is going on, saute your porcini mushrooms, when they have given up most of their liquid, add the leeks. Remove from heat and reserve. When rice is nearly tender, add the minced dried mushrooms, sauteed mixture, and herbs. Stir in some grated cheese, if you like, and the crumbled salmon. Top with a little more grated cheese and serve while warm. Toss salad and serve with warm crusty bread.

Music in the video is from the new Amon Tobin CD, “ISAM”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

BOTW–Ovila Dubbel

First, just a reminder that Sunday, June 26, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Purple Potatoes and Garlic roasted with Rosemary.

Ovila Dubbel.

Sierra Nevada is producing this beer in association with the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, CA, about 20 Miles from Chico. They are planning on releasing three, all called Ovila. The first is this Dubbel. It is quite tasty, a fairly traditional Belgian in style, not a modern reinterpretation. Glad to see Sierra Nevada producing so many new and interesting experiments, along with their regular offerings. Later this year they will release a Saison and a Quadrupel.

Ovila Abbey Ales: Sierra Nevada Update

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of these beers will go toward the restoration of the historic Ovila chapter house building on the grounds of the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, California, just a few miles north of Sierra Nevada’s home in Chico. This medieval chapter house was begun in 1190 near the village of Trillo, Spain. Monks lived, prayed, and worked there for nearly 800 years. In 1931, newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst purchased the abbey, dismantled it stone-by-stone, and shipped it to Northern California. Hearst’s plans were never realized, and the stones fell into disrepair. In 1994, the monks of the Abbey of New Clairvaux gained possession of the ruins, and began the painstaking reconstruction of the historic abbey.

Mrs. Flannestad got a little obsessed with Blueberries this week and purchased a whole lot, so she made a Blueberry Buckle with some of them.

Five Dot Ribeyes, ready for grilling.

Fresh Porcini Mushrooms sauteed with shallots and deglazed with Sherry.

First Flip.

First Turn.

Weber.

One more Flip.

Monty would like some steak, please.

Grilled Ribeyes, Roasted Potatoes, and braised greens.

Buckle for dessert.

Brandy Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, June 26, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Brandy Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp. Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Brandy. (2 oz Dudognon Cognac Reserve)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water.

Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz*, using Brandy instead of Gin.”

*Gin Fizz. Juice of ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; 1 tablespoon of Powdered Sugar; 1 drink Dry Gin. Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.

Right, so I’m a bit of a moron, here I was saying the Albemarle Fizz was a bit sweet, when, according to Hugo Ensslin, like the Plain Gin Fizz, it should have been made with the juice of “1/2 Lime and the Juice of 1/2 Lemon”.

And again, I failed to notice when making the Brandy Fizz.

Damn.

Well, I have to say, while it might have been OK with the Raspberry flavors of the Albemarle Fizz, I don’t think lime juice would have been awesome in the Brandy Fizz.

I was perfectly happy with this drink as it is, with its Cognac Flavor flag waving proudly.

Though, to be honest, with a Cognac as fine as the Dudognon, a plain soda and Cognac Highball would have been perfectly delicious.

Unfortunately, or fortunately, its the only Brandy I have in the house at the moment.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Apple Blow Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, June 26, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Apple Blow Fizz
The White of 1 Egg.
4 Dashes Lemon Juice. (Juice 1/2 small lemon)
1 Teaspoonful of Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Calvados. (2 oz Laird’s Straight Apple Brandy)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and fill with soda water.

Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917, “1 drink Applejack; 4 dashes Lemon Juice; 1 spoonful Sugar; White of 1 Egg. Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into a fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.”

While I would really love to make this with Calvados, it seems at odds with the spirit of the drink. And the original recipe does specify AppleJack. So we use the Laird’s Straight Apple Brandy.

Laird’s Straight Apple Brandy, woo! Nothing like an 100 Proof pick-me-up!

Anyway, another fizz which is light on the modifiers, only “4 dashes” of lemon juice and a teaspoon of sugar to ameliorate the potent influence of the Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy, making this quite a potent tipple.

I don’t know if it is a sign of my incipient dipsomania, but I rather enjoyed the take no prisoners boozy approach of the Apple Blow Fizz.

I’ve pondered the name over the years and never really figured out the whole “Blow” thing. It just sounds vaguely salacious to me. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that the egg white creates a head which could be blown off the top in some sort of drunken salute to your fellow drinkers, as in the Froth Blower Cocktail and Ancient Order of Froth Blowers?

From the Wikipedia Article:

The Ancient Order of Froth-Blowers was a humorous British charitable organisation “to foster the noble Art and gentle and healthy Pastime of froth blowing amongst Gentlemen of-leisure and ex-Soldiers”. Running from 1924-1931, it was founded by Bert Temple, an ex-soldier and silk-merchant, initially to raise £100 (equal to £4,228 today) for the children’s charities of the surgeon Sir Alfred Fripp. One of the Order’s first meeting places was the Swan, Fittleworth, W. Sussex – the ‘No. 0 Vat’.

History

Temple founded the organisation in gratitude for life-saving stomach surgery by Fripp. Membership of this spoof order cost 5 shillings (equal to £11 today), each member receiving a pair of silver, enamelled cuff-links and a membership booklet and card entitling them to blow froth off any member’s beer “and occasionally off non-members’ beer provided they are not looking or are of a peaceful disposition“. The motto was “Lubrication in Moderation”.

That’s about all I can come up with.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Albemarle Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, June 26, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Albemarle Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well strain into medium size glass and fill with syphon soda water. Add teaspoonful Raspberry Syrup (1 tsp Homemade Raspberry Syrup*).

You’re out with a girl, you order a Gin Fizz. “For the Lady?” Perhaps an enpinkened Gin Fizz? The Cosmo of its day, no doubt.

Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917, “Made same as plain Gin Fizz**, adding Raspberry Syrup.”

So I didn’t add Raspberry Syrup afterwards, as it appears the Savoy Cocktail Book is instructing you, I just shook it with the drink.

Albemarle, as in Albemarle North Carolina?

The Historic Albemarle Region

FOUR HUNDRED YEARS of History for North Carolina -indeed for the Nation- begins around the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.  From Sir Walter Raleigh’s Lost Colony to existing homes that stood decades before the Revolutionary War to modern-day river towns, this is a land of rich heritage.

Chartered to the Lords Proprietors before the colonies were formed with the Atlantic Ocean as its eastern boundary and encompassing much of the original colony in its domain, the original Albemarle Region now includes the Albemarle, the Pamlico-Neuse Region, and the Outer Banks region -and beyond.

The Lost Colony

In 1584, explorers Philip Amadas and Arthur Barlowe were the first English explorers to set eyes on the North Carolina. They had been sent to the area by Sir Walter Raleigh with the mission of scouting the broad sounds and estuaries in search of an ideal location for settlement. Amadas and Barlowe wrote glowing reports of the Albemarle Region, and when they returned to England a year later with two Natives, Manteo and Wanchese, all of Britain was abuzz with talk of the New World’s wonders.

Queen Elizabeth herself was impressed, and she granted Raleigh a patent to all the lands he could occupy. She named the new land “Virginia”, in honor of the Virgin Queen, and the next year, Raleigh sent a party of 100 soldiers, craftsmen and scholars to Roanoke Island.

Under the direction of Ralph Lane, the garrison was doomed from the beginning. They arrived too late in the season for planting, and supplies were dwindling rapidly. To make matters worse, Lane, a military captain, alienated the neighboring Roanoke Indians, and ultimately sealed his own fate by murdering their chief, Wingina over a stolen cup. By 1586, when Sir Francis Drake stopped at Roanoke after a plundering expedition, Lane and his men had had enough. They abandoned the settlement and returned to England.

Detained by a war with Spain, Lane would not return to Roanoke until 1590. When they arrived, they found the colony deserted with no sign of the settlers, only the work “Croatoan” carved mysteriously in a Pallisade Post.

Bonus Roanoke Trivia: The first child born in the Americas to English parents, Virginia Dare, was born in that colony three weeks after their arrival, on August 18, 1587.

In any case, this is another pleasant Fizz. My lemons are on the small side this time of the year and not particularly juicy, so the thing that is striking me about these fizzes so far, especially when making them in an 8 oz glass, is just how boozy they are. Not really tart, as they would likely be made today. Kind of nice, and frankly, drinkable.

*Raspberry Syrup
1/2 cup Water
1 Cup Washed Raw Sugar
1 Cup Frozen Raspberries
1 Tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar

Combine water and sugar in a saucepan over low heat. When sugar is dissolved, add raspberries and Balsamic Vinegar. Strain through chinois or cheesecloth, mashing to get as much of the liquid as possible. Cool and refrigerate. Makes about 12 ounces.

**Gin Fizz. Juice of ½ Lime; Juice ½ Lemon; 1 tablespoon of Powdered Sugar; 1 drink Dry Gin. Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain into fizz glass, fill up with carbonated or any sparkling water desired.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Suffering Mixologist

You know what, the Suffering Bastard just isn’t really a very good drink. Bourbon, Gin, Lime, Angostura, and Ginger Beer?

Sounds about as bad as the hangover it was supposed to be curing.

But, as mixologists, I think we can do something about this, but we’ll need to plan ahead a bit.

I think we’re looking at about a year process, from start to finish.

First begin by aging your own Whiskey. Purchase a case of unaged whisky (White Dog) and a charred barrel. Both of these items are now for sale, conveniently, at many of your better liquor stores.

About 6 months in to your whisky aging process, you’ll want to start your gin. You can either go the infusion route, like Jeffrey Morgenthaler, or you can purchase a still and distill it yourself. Instructions for distillation are beyond the scope of this article, but there are many online forums which should be of help. You’ll be able to find all sorts of interesting spices and herbs at witchery stores and upscale groceries.

In either case, infusion or distillation, I suggest you discard the common knowledge about what a gin should be and feel free to improvise with whatever catches your fancy. Elderflower, go! Rangpur Lime, go! Lemon Verbena, why not?

Once your gin is ready, you’re going to want to pull your whiskey from the barrel, blend it with the gin, and return it to the barrel. The additional months, or years, you allow these spirits to marry will produce a truly superior end product.

About a month out from when you want to serve your cocktail, you’ll need to start the infusion for your bitters. Check any number of articles on doing this, from Jamie Boudreau to Robert Heugel. Once you’ve made your bitters, of course using a Buechner Funnel to vacuum filter them, you’ll want to again pull your gin and whisky from the barrel, add the bitters, and return the mixture to the barrel. I suggest erring on the side of generosity. Really, if it isn’t bitter, it isn’t a cocktail.

About this time, you’re going to want to start promoting your genius new version of the Suffering Bastard. I would suggest hiring a full time publicist and hitting the local bars. Maybe even take out a few ads in national papers or magazines. Of course you’ll want to attend the major trade shows, Tales of the Cocktail, Manhattan Cocktail Classic, etc. just to press the flesh and give that personal touch to your presence. You’re not just a brand, after all. Don’t forget to sponsor a few panels at these conferences. That kind of exposure, a bunch of drunk people in a hotel conference room, is worth its weight in gold.

After doing some publicity, you’ll probably have come onto the radar of the original creator of the drink, Trad’r Vick, and his organization. Be sure to ignore any and all communications from them. You are a drinks artist, not a business man, there’s no reason to talk to those suits.

Next you’ll need to make your Ginger Beer. After distilling your own gin, making ginger beer is a snap. Check this recipe from Good Eats: Making Ginger Beer 48 hours? Pah, most of that is just sitting around in your cabinet.

Why do Trad’r Vick and his lawyers keep calling you? Just ignore them.

You’ll want to start the last minute publicity for your drink unveiling. Be sure to rent a space of suitable gravitas and capacity for your needs. Invite everyone you know, sending simultaneous and identical tweets, facebook invitations, and email blasts.

Who is that knocking?

What? Trad’r Vick and a subpoena? Agh, they are trampling on your creativity! Saying they own the Tradermark to the Suffering Bastard! Not only that, but telling you your drink isn’t even a Suffering Bastard, the Suffering Bastard, they claim, properly contains: Trad’r Vick Mai Tai Mix, two kinds of Rum, and a cucumber peel garnish. Pah, don’t they know you are referencing the original Suffering Bastard, created by Joe Scialom during World War II at the Shepheard’s Hotel in Cairo, Egypt? Philistines!

Well, you’ll show them, change the name of your drink, it bears no resemblance to their crappy “original” Suffering Bastard anyway. In honor of your self, you call it the Poor Long Suffering Mixologist, or P.L.S.M., for short.

Aged Spirits ready, Ginger Beer on tap, you’re ready to go. The last thing you need to do is source the fresh ingredients.

Be sure and spare no expense finding the exact correct variety of mint for this. Thyme Mint, Bergamot Mint, whatever you think will work best.

Not to mention finding the most obscure variety of lime or citrus. I’d suggest thinking about Seville Oranges or perhaps Rangpur Limes.

Nearly ready, all your friends have replied and are showing up. The bar or concert hall is primed for your 100% hand made, self aged, craft cocktail PLSM!

Oh, but we’ve forgotten the ice! Only the best! Be sure and only use the purest virgin spring water, and freeze it in such a way it is perfectly clear! Then hand carve it to order!

Last minute details, last minute details!

Maybe you should try the drink?

Oh, bleah, this really isn’t a very good drink. You know, the Suffering Bastard wasn’t very good to start out with, and it tastes like you’ve actually made it worse. What were you thinking?

Notify your publicist, stop the presses, call off your event. Well, when life hands you lemons, it’s time to, to… Write about it. You’re going to write a book (or blog) about your cocktail adventure, instead of actually serving drinks. That’s where the REAL money is!

I think that qualifies as a post about Niche Spirits, don’t you?

Thanks to Adventures in Cocktails for hosting!

MxMo LVIII: Favorite Niche Spirit

Check out their site for more posts on similar themes.

Alabama Fizz

First, just a reminder that Sunday, June 26, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails, (they also have a great beer selection,) on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders, (and me,) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Chicken, EdaMame, and Noodle Stir-Fry

“From “Fresh Flavor Fast,” by Everyday Food, from the kitchens of Martha Stewart Living.”

Really, San Francisco Chronicle, a Stir-Fry, “from the kitchens of Martha Stewart Living,” is the best you can do? Isn’t that sort of like making a French style recipe from Rick Bayless? A Creole recipe from Grant Achatz? A Mexican recipe from Sandra Lee?

Mrs. Flannestad was taken with the idea of an Edamame and noodle stir-fry, so I set about making this bland recipe a bit more interesting, without making it any less “Fast” or “Fresh”. I may also be a White Ghost, but I think I can push this dish a bit more in the direction of my concept of actual Chinese Food.

Revised Chicken, EdaMame, and Noodle Stir-Fry

INGREDIENTS:

Chicken Marinade
2 Tablespoons Soy Sauce
1 Tablespoon Chinese Rice Wine
1 Tablespoon Water
dash Sesame Oil
1 teaspoon Corn Starch

Sauce
1/2 Cup Chicken Stock
3 Tablespoons Soy Sauce
2 Tablespoons Chinese Rice Wine
2 Dashes Chinese Black Vinegar
1/2 teaspoon Sesame Oil

1 Tablespoon Cornstarch combined dissolved with 1 Tablespoon of water

Minced Seasonings
1 Tablespoon Ginger, minced
1 Tablespoon Garlic, minced
1 Tablespoon Green Onions, minced

1 Tablespoon Hot Chile Bean Paste

1/2 Chicken Breast, trimmed and sliced
2 Baby Bok Choy heads, Washed and Sliced
1 package Eda Mame, thawed
1/2 package Udon Noodles
Cilantro, washed, stemmed and chopped
Peanut or other vegetable oil

Prep done, I started to get set up for the weekly video. If you look closely, you can see the marinating chicken in the upper left corner.

I was talking to Mrs. Flannestad about the recent videos and she was less than approving. She felt like I’d traded in what was cool about them for the same dumb talking head shit that everyone else who is making cocktail videos does. I see her point.

FIZZES.

Wow, the last big section of drinks. This has to be the Savoy Home Stretch: Fizzes. Coolers. Rickeys. Daisies. Fixes. Juleps. Smashes. Cobblers. Frappe. Punches. Cups!

Alabama Fizz
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon. (Juice 1/2 Lemon)
1/2 Tablespoonful Powdered Sugar. (Generous Teaspoon Caster Sugar)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well, strain into medium size glass and Fill with soda water. Add 2 sprigs of Fresh Mint.

As I was stripping the sprigs of mint to use as garnish, it occurred to me that I could throw the leaves into the mixing tin for a little extra mint zest in the drink. Shortly thereafter, I realized that the Alabama Fizz is pretty much exactly a South Side Cocktail.

As most of the Fizzes seem to come from Hugo Ensslin’s book and the South Side from Harry McElhone, I’m not sure who to exactly credit for the genius of this drink.

But, South Side Cocktail or Alabama Fizz, this is a delicious drink.

Music in the background is from the Harmonia album, “Tracks and Traces“.

Drink made, I set about to cooking dinner.

Revised Chicken, EdaMame, and Noodle Stir-Fry

METHOD:

Combine marinade with chicken, and toss to coat. Put on water to boil the udon noodles, while you do the rest of the prep. Cook until slightly underdone and rinse well. Set aside. Over medium heat, add 1 tsp peanut oil to your wok, and swirl to coat surface. When the peanut oil is heated until smoking, add 1/4 cup more oil to wok. Drain marinade from Chicken. When oil is smoking hot, add half the chicken to the oil and quickly cook. Remove chicken from oil and set aside. Heat oil again and add rest of chicken to cook. Remove chicken from oil, pour all but 1 tablespoon of oil from wok. Heat until smoking and add Minced Seasonings. Cook until fragrant and add Chile Bean Paste. Add Eda Mame and toss. Add Sauce and bring to a simmer. Add Chicken and simmer briefly. Add Bok Choy and when it is again hot, stir in corn starch slurry. Add noodles, toss to coat, and pour out onto serving plate. Sprinkle over Cilantro.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Litigious Bastard

But, what do you do with the rest of that bottle of Pusser’s you’ve had mouldering at the back of your liquor cabinet?

Litigious Bastard

1 oz Pusser’s British Navy Rum
1 oz Canton Ginger
Juice 1 Lime and 1 half spent lime shell

Shake violently with cracked ice and pour into a bucket. Fill with Soda Water and dash on top a healthy amount of Angostura Bitters. Garnish with a couple of very enthusiastically spanked mint sprigs.

You know, this is actually a bit better than it should be.

And I’m going to have to insist, even though you might be tempted to make the Litigious Bastard with Smith & Cross, that you stick to Pusser’s for this one.

BOTW–Thiriez EXTRA

Over the years we’ve tried a few Hopped American Beers in an Belgian style and even a few Belgian Beers inspired by American Ales. I believe this is the first hopped French Saison we’ve run across, though the inspiration is more English than American.

It appears to be imported into the US by Shelton Brothers, who have a page about it on their website, Thiriez EXTRA:

This particular beer is an interesting joint effort with an English brewery. It uses one hop varietal, a rather unusual hop grown in Kent called ‘Bramling Cross.’ The malt is from 2-row spring barley grown in France. (The English brewer is brewing to the same recipe, with the same ingredients, for sale in the U.K., under the French name.) The result has certain characteristics of an English bitter: it’s not too strong, very dry, and eminently drinkable.

And the brewery Thiriez itself has this to say about the beer:

Initialement nommée “les Frères de la Bière”, elle est le fruit d’un partenariat avec un brasseur anglais, John Davidson de la Swale Brewery, dans le cadre d’un projet Interreg.
Blonde, légère en alcool, un houblon aromatique du Kent, utilisé très généreusement lui confère son caractère unique..

“Dès l’attaque, l’amertume est là, puissante, enrobante,bien associée au malt. Structure moelleuse, bien maltée et sans lourdeur. Du houblon à l’état nature envahit le palais. Les amateurs vont en raffoler”

Bière Magazine mars-avril 2006

Exportée au USA sous le nom de Thiriez EXTRA

Quite a head on that one! I apologize to the beer geeks in the audience. Well the gentlemen at the shop did warn me to have a glass ready when I opened the bottle. Definitely one of those which would need to be poured very, very carefully to get the appropriate 3/4 inch head.

In any case, this is another selection from Healthy Spirits, I was in the mood for a Saison last Friday afternoon, and this was their recommendation. To quote, “My favorite Saison nobody is buying.” I totally agree with just about everything the Shelton Bros website has to say about this beer, pleasant, interesting character, not too strong. The sort of beer, in an ideal world, you could drink all afternoon while watching the grass grow or weeding the garden in France or Belgium.

Oven braised Steelhead filet baked on top of lemon slices, with fresh tarragon.

Mrs. Flannestad purchased a large amount of Blueberries at the Alemany Farmers’ Market, with the hopes of making a Clafoutis. We found a recipe for Blueberry and Nectarine Clafoutis on epicurious, and she made it with peaches. Delicious.

Monty is (n)ever patient.

Merry Edwards 2007 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir

The wine is a mirror, clearly reflecting a pure fruit focus, characteristic of this vintage. Luminescent ruby in color, its attractive aroma is perfumed with a mouthwatering medley of cola, red raspberries, plums and blueberries. Exotic Indian spices, a touch of earth and vanilla bean add complex accents. This elegant Pinot shows an invitingly rich entry. The refined mid-palate is soft, round and supple followed by a finish that offers balanced, restrained tannins. Appealing now, this wine will surprise you with its development – the cool area parentage ensures subtle integration of flavors with increased depth and body over time.

An all right wine. Definitely fruit forward. It was just too big for the Steelhead prepration I had decided on. Rose or a hearty white might have been more appropriate.

Red Quinoa Pilaf with Carrots, Spring Onions, and Pine Nuts. Tomatero Farms Lacinto Kale with caramelized onions. I had an idea with the kale to cut the kale stems and caramelize them with the onions. I always like roasted brassicas, and this turned out similar and quite delicious.