Clayton’s Temperence Cocktail


Clayton’s Temperance Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
3/4 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a glass and top with chilled soda water.)

Not that interesting, just kind of tastes like too sweet lemony cola. Some lime juice (and a splash of High West Rendezvous Rye) rendered it somewhat more palatable. Still, the Pussyfoot was definitely the better cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail

Well, the first section after the 700 and some odd “Cocktails” is, drumroll…

Non-Alcoholic Cocktails

Actually, I wish there were some more exciting cocktails here, but most seem to have been cribbed from a “Clayton’s Kola Tonic” brochure.

“Claytons. The drink you have when you’re not having a drink.”

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (Sirop-de-Citron, homemade)
1/4 Orange Juice. (Blood Orange Juice)
1/2 Kola Tonic. (Clayton’s Kola Tonic)
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass. (Or build in a short glass and top with chilled soda water.)

These sorts of cocktails, with my really intense and sweet Sirop-de-Citron, I just find to be too concentrated in flavor to be served as “up” cocktails. I much prefer them built with soda water instead, even over ice.

The Clayton’s Pussyfoot is actually darn tasty. I might, or might not, recommend slipping a splash of Rye Whiskey in there, just to juice it up, but certainly, not very much, especially with that name.

Hey, check out the new Schott-Zwiesel glassware. It’s from the Schumann Basic Bar collection. I really like these little glasses. Perfect size for a 19th Century highball or a glass of vermouth while making dinner. They really remind me of some of the vintage highball glassware I’ve seen. Also, they were on sale, so cool!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the drinks in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, the, uh, Sauterne Cup.

Brandy Cocktail (Another Recipe) for Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Huh, this Brandy Cocktail sounds interesting, what with the tincture of licorice and all…

Kinda Sazerac-ish!

Brandy Cocktail (Another Recipe) for Bottling
5 gallon Brandy.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
1/4 Pint Essence of Cognac.
1 Ounce Tincture of Cloves.
1 Ounce Tincture of Gentian.
2 Ounces Tincture of Orange Peel.
1/4 Ounce Tincture of Cardamoms.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Liquorice Root.
Mix the essence and tinctures with a portion of the spirits; add the remainder of the ingredients, and colour with a sufficient quantity of Solferino and caramel (in equal parts) to give the Desired color.

Sure I can’t get anyone to sponsor these experiments? Someone with A LOT of friends?

I will note that all of these cocktails come, more or less, verbatim from the 1887 version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide that Darcy has up over at Art of Drink:

Cocktails for Bottling

For example:

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of spirits (70 per cent.).
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of gum syrup.
¼ pint of essence of Cognac.
1 ounce of tincture of cloves.
1 ounce of tincture of gentian.
2 ounces of tincture of orange peel.
¼ ounce of tincture of cardamoms.
½ ounce of tincture of liquorice root.

Mix the essence and tinctures with a portion of the
spirits; add the remainder of the ingredients, and
color with a sufficient quantity of Solferino and caramel
(in equal parts) to give the desired color.

However, they do not seem to be in the 1862 edition of his book, as published by Mud Puddle Books.

On to “Non-Alcoholic Cocktails”!

BOTW–Arend Tripel

I really like this beer. First off, I find most Belgian-style Tripels to be too sweet for my taste.

GREAT LABEL! Anyway, the Arend Tripel, while in reality not all that dry, manages to seem drier than it is. I think it is the touch of hops, especially, that give it that impression.

It is also very complex, you can whip out some of those fun Belgian descriptors: Bananas, Clove, bubblegum, and the always popular “Horse Blanket”. No, I’m kidding about the Horse Blanket, I don’t detect much, if any, Brett in this beer. Save that descriptor for Waterloo’s Oud Beersel Oude Gueze. That’s Oud, not Ood, Dr. Who Fans, but if you want to conflate, conflate away.

Kudos to Waterloo Beverages for bringing in this, and the other eclectic Belgian Beers of their range. Great beers, one and all.

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Another batched cocktail for bottling, this one with Brandy.

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling
5 Gallons Strong Brandy.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Bitters.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
1 Bottle Curacao.
Mix thoroughly, and filter through Canton flannel.

Mmm, flannel filtered! Even plainer than the previous Bourbon Cocktail, get out your quart bottles of Angostura.

This recipe comes verbatim from the version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide that Darcy has up over on Art of Drink. This recipe was originally as follows:

Brandy Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of strong brandy.
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of Stoughton’s Bitters.
1 quart of gum syrup.
1 bottle of Curacoa.

Mix thoroughly, and filter through Canton flannel.

Bourbon Cocktail for Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Bourbon Cocktail for Bottling
5 Gallons Bourbon Rye Whisky.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
2 Ounces Tincture of Orange Peel.
1 Ounce Tincture of Lemon Peel.
1 Ounce Tincture Gentian.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Cardamoms.
Mix these ingredients thoroughly and colour with Solferino and caramel, in equal proportions.

Gotta get me some of that “Bourbon Rye Whiskey”!

All the same, kind of plain, I’d say.

This recipe comes, more or less, verbatim from the version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide which Darcy has up over on Art of Drink:

Bourbon Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of Bourbon.
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of gum syrup.
2 ounces of tincture of orange peel.
1 ounce of tincture of lemon peel.
1 ounce of tincture of gentian.
½ ounce of tincture of cardamoms.

Mix these ingredients thoroughly, and color with
Solferino and caramel, in equal proportions.

Gin Cocktail For Bottling

First, just a reminder that Sunday, March 27, 2011, is our monthly exercise in folly, Savoy Cocktail Book Night at Alembic Bar. If any of the cocktails on this blog have captured your fancy, stop by after 6 and allow the skilled bartenders (and me) to make them for you. It is always a fun time.

Prepared Cocktails for Bottling.

I’m going to skip ahead to the next section, while I finish getting the Zed in order.

Unfortunately, I’m not going to make any of these cocktails, the batches are just too large and the amounts too weird.

If there are any bars or spirits reps who might want to work with me to give these a try, let me know. Until then I will wait for the grant for “Advanced Alcoholic Studies” to roll in.

Gin Cocktail for Bottling
5 Gallons Gin.
2 Gallons Water.
1 Quart Gomme Syrup.
2 Ounces Tincture of Orange Peel.
7 Ounces Tincture of Gentian.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Cardamoms.
1/2 Ounce Tincture of Lemon Peel.
Mix together, and give the desired colour with Solferino and caramel, in equal proportion.

This recipe comes verbatim from the version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide which Dary has up over on Art of Drink.

Gin Cocktail for Bottling.
Take 5 gallons of gin.
2 gallons of water.
1 quart of gum syrup.
2 ounces of tincture of orange peeL
7 ounces of tincture of gentian.
½ ounce of tincture of cardamoms.
½ ounce of tincture of lemon peel.

Mix them together, and give the desired color with
Solferino and caramel, in equal proportions.

Saturday Night Dinner March 12, 2011


Normally, Pollo alla Diavola is chicken marinated in lemon and copious black pepper. But, I was low on lemons, so I used a kind of “Frenchy” marinade of dijon mustard, herbs, vinegar, and copious black pepper.

Spatchcocked and Roasted Poulet Rouge, Pollo alla Diavola-ish
Roasted Asparagus with Black Trumpet “dirt” (for Dominique)
Roasted Fingerlings, cooked under roasting chicken

Problems: Black trumpets gave up too much water, some of the asparagus ended up mushy. In the future roast asparagus and mushrooms separately. One of the restaurants which used to be in the ferry building, cooked its potatoes under the roasting meats (A bit questionable from a food safety perspective.) I decided to try something similar with the potatoes here and cooked them underneath the broiling pan, so they would catch some of the chicken drippings. They cooked unevenly. In the future, I would par cook the potatoes before placing the chicken on top.

Joseph Swan 2007 Russian River Valley Mouvedre.

Lemon-Cardamom Tea Cake (from Knead Patisserie) with Balsamic marinated strawberries and ice cream.

Received Goods: Bulleit Rye Whiskey

There is a ridiculously dorky youtube phenomenon called “unboxing”. When a tech geek gets a fancy new gizmo or game, they make a video of themselves opening up the box. Weird, eh? Well, I thought it might be funny to apply the same to booze. I am a booze geek, after all.

I know the conventions of “unboxing” are usually that you talk about the thing while you open it. But I figured, I’d just show making a cocktail, instead.

When life gives you Rye Whiskey, make Sazeracs!

And a fine Sazerac it does make.

Trying it on it’s own, I found it to be surprising mellow, though it did lack a real finish or presence in the glass.

Still, for around $25 for 750ml, the Bulleit Rye is not a bad deal at all for a mixing Rye Whiskey.

If you have sharp eyes, you will notice that is a big bag of Meyer Lemons some friends gave me from the tree in their back yard. Meyer Lemon Peel, not exactly kosher for Sazeracs, as their zest has a sort of weird Thyme and white pepper-like scent.

Still a tasty Sazerac, if a bit culinarily herbal.

Music in the background from Mr. Colin Stetson‘s new release, “New History Warfare Volume 2: Judges“.

Questions and addenda:

Mahon McGrath, Q: “While it definitely isn’t a powerhouse or complex, it IS nice to see a decent new rye come on the market at around $20.”

A: “It would be pretty interesting to do a blind tasting of all the Ryes produced at LDI and see which came out on top. But, I agree, the Bulleit Rye is a good product and it’s very nice to see the company choosing to market it at a reasonable price point.”

Ben, Q: “Sorry that the the Bulleit Rye didn’t impress more – I had high hopes for it. I’m hoping to discover that our opinions differ when I get my hands on it. You should try the Redemption releases if you haven’t yet – their rye is 95% rye grain in the mash (like Bulleit), their high rye bourbon is ~36% rye (if memory serves), and they price around $26-29 a bottle. Love to know what you think about these. I like them a lot, and would put up the Redemption Rye up against the pricier Templeton (the other rye I have right now).

“Since we have a Meyer Lemon tree in our yard, that’s what has been going in my Sazeracs and Vieux Carrés (and the wife’s Sidecars and Lemon Drops). I’ll have to do a taste test against other lemons – Eureka from the market or Ponderosa from a friend’s tree…”

A: “Bulleit, Redemption, Templeton, and Willet all get their Rye Whiskey from LDI in Lawrenceburg, IN, none of them are distilling this spirit themselves.. You can tell from the signature 95% Rye, 5% Barley mashbill. High West also gets some of the Rye they use for their Vatted (Blended?) Whiskeys from LDI.

“I need to rewrite this post a bit, it comes off too negative. There are a lot of things to like about Bulleit, first off being the price. Among the Ryes in the $20-30 price range, I think only Rittenhouse stands out as the only one I would buy instead of Bulleit. And there are a bunch of Ryes in the $30-40 range I would pick it over. So it isn’t bad at all.

“It’s just I’ve been drinking a lot of high quality pot still whiskeys lately, and the Bulleit Rye just doesn’t hold a candle to the length and interest you get from those, mixing or sipping. YMMV.”

From Scott Brown, Q: “Almost bout a bottle of this today as it just showed up in our shops in Connecticut, how is it as an evening dram to sip?”

A: “Scott, a friend and I did a tasting of several Ryes last night and found the Bulleit to be the least complex of the bunch. Not harsh or unpleasant in any way, but to us it lacked the complexity you’d look for in a “sipping” spirit.

“That said, if I could only spend around $20 for a good all around Rye, and couldn’t get Rittenhouse Bonded, I would probably pick the Bulleit. In fact, there are probably several ryes in the $30-40 range that I would pass over for the Bulleit.”

BOTW–Velvet Merkin

Right, well, this is sort of my St. Patrick’s Day Post… The Irish love a good shaggy dog story, right?

At Alembic Bar, they would occasionally have the Firestone-Walker beer “Velvet Merkin” on tap. A very nice California Oatmeal Stout with a hilarious name.

I leave it to you, to discover the rather Not Safe For Work nature of the meaning of “Merkin”.

Just this winter, I found Firestone-Walker had finally bottled what I thought was “Velvet Merkin”. This amused me to no end, and I had to buy a six pack tout de suite. Thinking Firestone-Walker had managed to slip one past the TTB, I posted the news to facebook, “Velvet Merkin in bottles! Looks like someone at the TTB forgot to bring their dictionary to work!” Unfortunately, Dan Miller, (of Sloshed!,) deflated my enjoyment by pointing out the beer was now called “Velvet Merlin”.

Looked in the fridge. Sure enough the beer had gone from Burlesque to Renaissance Faire. “Velvet Merlin”? Really? That is just soooo lame.

Well, despite the pathetic sorcerous nature of the new name, the beer is still tasty.

At 5.5% ABV, Velvet Merlin is a nice change from the usual over alcoholic Imperial Stouts so popular these days with American Craft brewers. Good flavor, too, and nice body. All the things you look for in an Oatmeal Stout. It will definitely put some hair on your… Well… Uh, chin. Yeah, that’s it. Chin.