White Rose Cocktail

White Rose Cocktail
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (Juice 1/4 Orange)
The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
The White of 1 Egg.
1/4 Maraschino. (1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Bols Genever)
Shake well and strain into medium size glass.
Source: Hugo Ensslin, “Recipes for Mixed Drinks” 1916-1917

I’ve made this cocktail a few times at Alembic Bar Savoy Nights, and customers always really enjoy it.

Having been there, and done that, I thought I’d change up the gin.

I’ve been intrigued by the use of Genever in Sour cocktails, but hadn’t really tried one with egg white and/or Maraschino liqueur. However, given the friendliness of Genever to these ingredients, it didn’t seem like that big a chance to take.

After trying it, though, I have to say I definitely preferred the dry gin version I’ve made at Alembic. The well gin there is Beefeater, and this is a great Beefeater cocktail. Maybe not so much a great Genever Sour, but your mileage may vary.

Give it a try and let me know what you think.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Plush Cocktail

White Plush Cocktail
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
1 Liqueur Glass Maraschino. (1 1/2 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/2 Pint of Milk. (8 oz Meyenberg Whole Goat Milk)
Shake well and strain into long tumbler.

Gin, Maraschino, and Milk? My stomach churned at the thought.

My constitution doesn’t really get along with regular milk in any quantity. I stopped drinking Milk way back in college, so there was no way I was making this as written. However, when I was examining the Dairy at our local grocery, I noticed this Whole Goats Milk. Hey! If I have to drink it, I bet I could drink the White Plush with Goats Milk.

Oof, though, Mrs. Flannestad took many pictures, trying to get them to turn out on her digital camera. She kept saying, “Again! Again! I didn’t get the picture. Drink more Milk! Again! Again!”

Got Milk?

Eventually, I had to say, “enough!” I just couldn’t drink any more Milk, even Goat Milk. Not that the White Plush was bad, exactly, but jeez. Enough Milk, is enough.

The main executional problem with the White Plush is that this is just too much volume for most shakers, especially after it is all foamy. And who knew Goat Milk would be so foamy? Didn’t really work at all in the usual 18/28 double metal tin. Maybe with a Mako Shaker on top of a 28 oz tin?

Definitely in the, “It could have been worse, but I wouldn’t do it again, unless you were paying me,” category of Savoy Cocktails.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Lily Cocktail

White Lily Cocktail
1/3 Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Barbancourt White)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Miller’s Gin)
1 Dash Absinthe. (dash Absinthe Duplais Verte)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I normally don’t enjoy drinks from Judge Jr.’s 1927 book, “Here’s How”, but I found the White Lily strangely interesting.

There is just something fascinating about the combination of Barbancourt White Rhum, Orange, Miller’s Gin, and Absinthe.

However, I suppose I am cheating slightly by using a rum like Barbancourt instead of a Dry Cuban Style Rum. Even being a fairly mild agricole-ish rum, Barbancourt brings a lot more to the party than the average Molasses based white rum. So sue me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Lady Cocktail

White Lady Cocktail
1/4 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau, Shy 1/2 oz Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup)
1/2 Dry Gin . (1 1/2 oz Beefeater Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Ostensibly one of the most famous Savoy Cocktails, this was even sold as a bottled cocktail during the early years of the century:

Let’s talk a bit, first, about mixing Citrus Based Cocktails.

First off, a lot of times, it can be hard to balance a cocktail with only a liqueur as a sweetener. So, I sometimes hedge my bets by substituting in a portion of simple syrup for the liqueur. Reducing the amount of liqueur also puts the primary spirit of the cocktail in clearer focus, than using entirely liqueur.

This works really well in a Margarita, or its Gin cousin here, the White Lady.

The other element is the balance between sour and sweet elements of the cocktail. I find my preference is for slightly more sweetener than sour, of course depending on the sweetening power of the sweet element, syrup or liqueur. But if I’m using a 1-1 simple syrup, something like 3/4 ounce lemon or lime to 1 oz simple, or 1/2 oz liqueur and 1/2 oz Simple, works for me.

It’s worth noting, aside from the concentration of the syrup, that not all liqueurs or sweeteners have the same perceived sweetening powers. For example, the very popular Agave Syrup has much more perceived sweetness than even a very concentrated Sugar Syrup.  With a cocktail with 3/4 oz lemon or lime, you will probably not need more than a half ounce of Agave Syrup to balance the tartness of that cocktail.

From the other direction, some liqueurs or fruit syrups may contain a tart element which will reduce their sweetening efficacy in a cocktail. Depending, you may need to increase the amount of sweetener in the cocktail to balance out the cocktail.

Also, sometimes it is fun to change up the spirit to sweetener ratio.

Especially, if you have a particularly nice spirit, say Tequila or Brandy, it can be interesting to reduce both the tart and sweetening elements of the cocktail.

For example, with a tasty Calvados or Reposado Tequila, I would probably use 2 oz and spirits and only 1/2 oz of lime and a bit more than 1/2 oz of sweetener.  This puts the spirit first and foremost in the cocktails taste.  For example, during a recent event a friend and I made Jack Roses with exactly with that ratio: 2 oz Groult Calvados Reserve, 1/2 oz Lime Juice, 1/2 oz Grenadine. They were fantastic.

On the other hand, making the Jack Rose with Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy, I would absolutely go with 1 1/2 oz Spirit, 3/4 oz Lemon, 1/2 oz 1-1 Simple Syrup, and 1/2 oz Grenadine.

Also, some spirits are quite a bit sweeter than others, especially those where sweetener is allowed by the class definition: Rum, Gin, Blended Whiskey, etc. You may not need as much sweetener when making a Rum or Gin Sour, depending on the brand or style of Spirit.

The character of the citrus you are mixing with, can also be a big element when deciding how to balance your cocktail.

It was interesting, I recently worked an event organized by an East Coast Mixologist. He had made drinks for the same event in NY. However, when he batched the drinks on the West Coast using the same recipes he remarked to me, “Damn your bright, tart, West Coast citrus juice, it is messing up my batch recipes.”

Harry Craddock’s Simple Gin Sour sweetened with Cointreau was not the first cocktail with this name.

The other Harry, McElhone, first published a cocktail with this name in his book, “Harry’s ABC of Cocktails”:

White Lady
1/6 Brandy
1/6 Creme de Menthe
2/3 Cointreau
Shake well and strain.

However, for some reason, Craddock’s sour is the one we think of when we mix a White Lady, rather than McElhone’s Cointreau and Creme de Menthe based drink.

Go figure…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Cocktail

White Cocktail
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 Dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters)
2 Teaspoonsful Anisette. (2 tsp. Anis del Mono Dulce)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Junipero Gin)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

According to Robert Vermiere’s “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”, this is a, “Recipe by Harry Brecker, Antwerp.”

I guess Mr. Brecker was fond of the booze, as this is nothing but cold booze and Orange Bitters.

I also found myself enjoying it, though aware that this enjoyment was a somewhat dangerous, double edged sword, with potential consequences.

As to why Junipero Gin, sometimes there is no time for half measures.

Or as Winston Churchill said, “The era of procrastination, of half-measures, of soothing and baffling expedients, of delays is coming to its close. In its place we are entering a period of consequences.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Cargo Cocktail

The White Cargo Cocktail
1/2 Vanilla Ice Cream. (1 oz Ciao Bella Vaniglia Gelato)
1/2 Gin. (1 oz Tanqueray Gin)
No ice is necessary; just shake until thoroughly mixed, and add water or white wine if the concoction is too thick.

Another prohibition era indulgence ripped from the torrid pages of Judge Jr.’s 1927 “Here’s How”, the White Cargo is really pretty awful.

Without the soda fizz of the Silver Stallion, or finesse of the Soyer-au-Champagne, the White Cargo’s only real “virtue” is the slightly salacious name.

I assume, one feeds this to one’s date before knocking them out and selling them into the White Slave Trade!? They are certainly going to be very grumpy when they wake up on that slow boat to China with a vanilla flavored hangover.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

White Baby Cocktail

White Baby cocktail
1/2 Gin. (1 oz Ransom Old Tom Gin)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Sirop-de-Citron (1/2 oz Homemade Sirop-de-Citron)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

There’s a quote in the Savoy Cocktail Book that goes with this cocktail, but I think it best for all of us, if I will leave it to your enterprising fingers to search out.

I used the Ransom to provide a couple more layers of character along with the citrus elements.

With the Ransom and homemeade Sirop-de-Citron this doesn’t have bad flavor at all, but really could have used a bit of lemon juice to spruce it up.

It’s just too sweet as it is, a liquid lemon life saver.

Might be good warm, if you have a cold or sore throat, otherwise, add a dash of fresh lemon juice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Whist Cocktail

Whist Cocktail
1/4 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz Havana Club 7 Year)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Calvados Montrueil Reserve)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This is a delightful drink that has been known in the West Indies for countless years. It might be described as a West Indies “Sundowner”.

Not quite sure why all these West Indies cocktails are showing up all of a sudden, but here’s another.

Described as a “Sundowner”, according to the Wiktionary, that means, “A cocktail consumed at sunset, or to signify the end of the day. A cocktail party in the early evening.”

Being 3/4 booze, this is a pretty stiff way to start the evening’s entertainment.

The cocktail called for “Bacardi Rum” for which I’d usually use a dry Cuban Style Rum. But I figured with the Italian Vermouth and Calvados, it wouldn’t hurt to use something with a bit more character.

I’ve always enjoyed the Havana Club 7 in Manhattans, it has just enough rough character that it makes sense to take the edges off with a bit of vermouth. Works here, lending a bit of aged character and sweetness to the drink.

Whist is a classic English trick-taking card game which was played widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. It derives from the 16th century game of Trump or Ruff, via Ruff and Honours. Although the rules are extremely simple, there is enormous scope for scientific play.

Apparently originating in the early 17th century, the now obsolete adjective “whist” and variant spelling “wist” (in which the word wistful has its roots), meant quiet, silent, and/or attentive. The adverb wistly is also defined as meaning intently.

In its heyday a large amount of literature about how to play whist was written. Edmond Hoyle, of “According to Hoyle” fame, wrote an early popular and definitive textbook, A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist. It is important to note that this game, called “French ruff” by Charles Cotton, is similar to écarté. English ruff-and-honours, also described by Cotton, is similar to whist. If we admit that ruff and trump are convertible terms, of which there is scarcely a doubt, the game of trump was the precursor of whist. A purely English origin may, therefore, be claimed for trump (not la triomphe). No record is known to exist of the invention of this game, nor of the mode of its growth into ruff-and-honours, and finally into whist.

Huh, now that I think about it, the Whist Cocktail is very similar to the Corpse Reviver No. 1, with Rum instead of Brandy. Well, if you start your day gaining steam from a Corpse Reviver No 1, I guess it makes sense to end it quietly, with its cousin the Whist Cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Whisper Cocktail

Whisper Cocktail
(6 People)
2 Glasses Whisky (3/4 oz Thomas Handy Rye)
2 Glasses French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
2 Glasses Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
Pour into a shaker half full of cracked ice. Shake (I stirred) well and serve.

This cocktail is very simple to make and is a great favourite in the West Indies.

Since this drink seems to have been sourced from a British book, “Drinks Long & Short” by Nina Toye and A.H. Adair, I guess it refers to the British West Indies, which historically were comprised of, “Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bay Islands, Belize, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Croix (briefly), Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago (from 1797) and the Turks and Caicos Islands.”

Interesting, that they were drinking Gin (West Indies Cocktail) and Whisky in the British West Indies, and not so much Rum. I guess the habits of the home land die hard.

I do wonder, however, if it shouldn’t have been Scotch, if it was the British, rather than American Whiskey. Well, so it goes.

Since this is 2/3 Vermouth, I figured I might as well deploy some sort of Cask Strength Spirit, in this case the Thomas Handy Straight Rye Whiskey of a few years ago (2006, I believe). I mean, it is just a “Perfect Manhattan”, having both French and Italian Vermouth, but I guess it is pretty rare that that a Manhattan would be made an equal parts cocktail. More along the lines of the Affinity Cocktail, especially if made with Scotch.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Whiskey Special Cocktail

Whisky Special Cocktail
(6 People)
3 Glasses Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)
2 Glasses French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Glass Orange Juice. (1/4 oz Orange Juice)
Pour into the shaker and shake, adding a little nutmeg serve with an olive.

This is a very dry cocktail.

Sorry about the picture there, exposure problem due to pushing the film and forgetting to turn on the meter.

So, not only is this a “very dry” cocktail, but it is also a very weird cocktail.

Dry Manhattan with a bit of orange juice, nutmeg, and an OLIVE?

Really?

All right, there we go, we’ll do it.

Shudder!

Well, if you like Dry Manhattans, I guess this might be an interesting, uh, change of pace for you. If not, you can probably give this not very Special cocktail a skip.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.