Some Moth Cocktail

Some Moth Cocktail
1 Dash Absinthe
1/3 French Vermouth.
2/3 Plymouth Gin.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Add 1 pearl onion.

027

Some Moth (take 1)

1 oz Plymouth Gin
1/2 oz Genevieve
3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
dash Greenway Distillers Absinthe
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add 1 pearl onion.

After making the trek to Roxie market before hand to get English Cocktail Onions, I can’t believe I forgot to include the onion the first time I made this cocktail!

Dammit!

Fortunately, it is no great hardship to make another Dry Martini with a dash of Absinthe.

Of course, I was again thinking of the Saveur article where David Wondrich mentions that Plymouth Gin used to taste more like a Genever, thus added a touch of Anchor’s Genevieve to spice things up.

032

Some Moth (take 2)

1 oz Junipero Gin
1/2 oz Genevieve
3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth
dash Greenway Distillers Absinthe
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add 1 pearl onion.

But when I was thinking about this cocktail, and the inclusion of Genvieve, I thought, “Why not use Junipero?” After all, being the hardcore kind of guy that I am, it is my favorite gin for Martinis.

Damn, if that isn’t a lot tastier! Maybe it is just that the flavors of Junipero and Genevieve are so complementary, but this really rocked.

As far as the cocktail onion goes, well, I’d prefer a lemon twist. It’s nice to have a little appetizer with your Martini, but the pickled onion is such a flavor explosion, it more or less decimates the rest of the cocktail when you eat it.

No idea on the cocktail name, “Some Moth,” even though I find it quite intriguing and appealing. About all I can find using Google for “some moth” is the phrase, “some moth damage,” on eBay.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

2 thoughts on “Some Moth Cocktail

  1. Pingback: Spring Cocktail | Underhill-Lounge

  2. The name is curious. Perhaps relating to mothballs? Although not the most appetizing of etymologies. But the old-timey anise scent with the shape of the onion could be…

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