Ship Cocktail

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Ship Cocktail
(6 People)
4 Glasses Sherry. (2 oz Williams Humbert Dry Sack)
1 Glass Whisky. (1/2 oz Pig’s Nose Scotch*)
1 Glass Rum. (1/2 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum)
1 Glass Prune Syrup. (1/2 oz Prune Syrup)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
A little Sugar if desired. (None desired)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Since the cocktail, doesn’t specify what sorts of Whisky or Rum to use, I decided to go a bit avant garde and use Scotch Whisky and Jamaican Rum. Anyway, it is a Ship Cocktail. You gotta use Pirate Rum in a Ship Cocktail!

Interestingly, this turns out to be tasty, if you enjoy the flavors of the component spirits. The Sherry and Prune Syrup seem to act like flavor enhancers, extending and complementing the others. Nice, actually, probably one of my favorite recent Savoy Cocktails. Not that I expect that this endorsement will have a host of other cocktail bloggers running for the kitchen to make themselves prune syrup. Yer missing out, I tell you! It’s a very tasty sweetener, and those prunes stewed in port are tasty! Regularity, it is important, as you get older.

*Note, the teeny, tiny bottle of Pig’s Nose Scotch was sent to me by a marketing firm promoting the brand.  Tasty stuff!  I bet it is even tastier when poured from a 750ml bottle!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 2)

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Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 2)

(6 People)

Take the juice of 1 Orange (1/2 oz Orange Juice), 2 glasses of Whisky (1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey), 2 1/2 glasses of Sherry (1 1/2 oz Williams Humbert Dry Sack) and 1/2 glass of Cointreau (1/4 oz Cointreau). Add two cloves (bare drop clove oil), squeeze in the juice of 1/4 lemon (1/4 oz Lemon Juice), and add half a turn of the pepper-mill (pinch cayenne pepper). Fill the shaker with cracked ice. Shake and serve.

And you thought Sherry Twist (No. 1) was weird! I found a recipe for this one in Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” which called for “a little cayenne”, instead of the black pepper in the Savoy drink. As Duffy is usually a more accurate transcriber of other’s recipes, I went with his recommendation. Also, my cloves are kind of old and tired, so I went with a touch of clove oil instead.

A similar cocktail to Sherry Twist (No. 1), this is also a sort of spiced Sherry punch for 1. It is also fairly similar in character, on the light side with a mild acidity and not much sweetness. The Cayenne gives it a little prickliness. Not sure which I preferred, perhaps No. 1, as it is a bit less complex. Still, No. 2 isn’t bad either, and both are fairly unique.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 1)

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Sherry Twist Cocktail (No. 1)
(6 People)
1 Glass Brandy. (1/2 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alembic Brandy)
1 Glass French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
3 Glasses Sherry. (1 1/2 oz Williams Humbert Dry Sack)
2/3 Glass Cointreau. (1/3 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Glass Lemon Juice. (1/6 oz Lemon Juice)
1 Small Piece Cinnamon. (1 Small Piece Cinnamon)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Shave cinnamon over glass with microplane and serve.)

Just shaking with a “small piece of cinnamon” didn’t seem like it would get much character into the cocktail, so I added a little more as a garnish. As you can see, after all my complaining about pale dry sherries, I have gone ahead and gotten something a little closer to what I imagine might actually be used, Williams Humbert Dry Sack. Oddly, “Dry Sack” isn’t really “Dry” at all. It’s a medium sweet blend of several types of sherries. Not too sweet, not too dry. Also, not terribly expensive.

This was a drink I really had to make before I could even imagine what it would taste like.  The Sherry Twist (No. 1) is odd, but not bad. Really more of a single serving, a la minute, Sherry and Brandy Punch than a cocktail.  It is kind of intriguing, semi-dry, and spicy.  Not sure if I would make it again, but I would certainly not turn it down if it was offered.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sherry and Egg Cocktail

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Sherry and Egg Cocktail.
Place an Egg in Large Port Wine Glass, being careful not to break the yolk. Fill glass with Sherry (Solear Manzanilla Sherry).

Yep, that’s an egg in sherry. Wait, is that like a sherried, er, shired, egg? Breakfast of Champions?

This cocktail actually goes all the way back to Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide.

All the same, hm, of these sorts of whole raw egg cocktails, I have to say this was probably the least enjoyable so far. I hate to say it, but it sort of made the Prairie Hen seem appealing.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lonsdale Cocktail

When Jesse Friedman asked me to visit his house for a passover themed pot luck, the first thing that occurred was to me to bring was a bottle of the new Kosher version of 209 Gin.

Trying to think of a cocktail, Jesse mentioned that Elianna’s favorite cocktail was the Lonsdale from Beretta.

Fortunately, that is a cocktail I know and it just required a trip to the Alemany Farmers’ market for a few ingredients.

As far as I know, the Lonsdale is named after the London bar of the same name.  I do not know if the recipe is from that bar or a tribute to it.

Elianna said I should try to teach Jesse the cocktail.  I tried, but she seemed strangely opposed to the idea of measuring, so I am not quite sure how it will work out in the long run.  But here is the recipe for the cocktail anyway:

Lonsdale Cocktail
1 1/2 oz gin
1 oz Apple Juice
3/4 oz Lemon Juice
1/2 oz Honey Syrup (Honey diluted 1-1 with warm water)
6 Basil Leaves

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a spanked basil leaf.

http://www.thelonsdale.co.uk/

Sherry Cocktail

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Sherry Cocktail
4 dash Orange Bitters. (4 Dashes Bitter Truth Orange Bitters)
4 Dashes French Vermouth. (10ml Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1 Glass Sherry. (2 oz Solear Manzanilla Sherry)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

The few cocktails with these small amounts of French Vermouth puzzle me. With modern dry vermouth, I just don’t understand the function of even my relatively generous reading of 4 dashes. Did French Vermouth used to have more flavor?

Likewise, that’s a lot of orange bitters. Offhand, I can’t think of many drinks that call for 4 dashes. It kind of distracted from the other ingredients of the drink.

Last, but not least, I only had the Solear Manzanilla in the house when making this cocktail. For me, these pale dry sherries are not particularly interesting in most cocktails. I enjoy them on their own with cheeses and appetizers, but for cocktails they fade like ghosts.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Cocktail Kingdom Milk Punch

Cocktail Kingdom Milk Punch

1 liter Landy Cognac
1 liter Appleton V/X
375ml Batavia Arrack
Juice and Peel 5 Lemons, 1 Lime
1 Pineapple, chopped
1 1/2 cups water
3 teaspoons Darjeeling Tea
1 Tablespoon Coriander Seed
4 Cardamom Pods, crushed
1 stick Cassia Cinnamon
3 Cups Natural Sugar
1 Quart Straus Farms Whole Milk

Combine Rum, Brandy, Arrack, Chopped Pineapple, Juice and Peel of Lemons and Limes. Let stand to infuse for at least 2 days.

Heat water and steep tea and spices for the usual 6 minutes. Strain off solids. Add sugar and stir to dissolve. Cool spiced tea syrup.

Strain rum mixture. Juice boozy pineapple and add to rum mixture. Add Spiced tea syrup to rum mixture.

Heat Milk to 150 degrees F. If your hot plate blows the circuit breaker in the basement and you can’t find a pan, run next door to Starbucks and have them steam it for you. Add hot milk to sweetened rum mixture.

Let stand for 15 minutes.  Strain punch through cheesecloth and chill well before serving.

Makes about 3 liters.

To serve combine 2 parts punch with 1 part soda.

Sharky Punch Cocktail

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Sharky Punch Cocktail
1 teaspoonful Syrup (1 Teaspoon Small Hand Foods Gum Syrup)
1/4 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz 40 Creek 3 Grain Whisky)
3/4 Calvados or Apple Brandy. (Calvados Roger Groult Reserve)
Shake well and strain in into medium size glass… (Garnished with thin ginger slice and thick slice lemon peel.) …and fill with (well chilled!) soda water.

Whiskey, Apple Brandy, and Gum with soda seemed a tad plain, so I juiced it up a bit with the garnish. Sorry if that upsets you, but I’m the one who has to drink these things.

Shakey Punch reminds me of a lovely Laurie Anderson song narrated by the late William S. Burroughs, “Sharkey’s Night”.

Well, in the case above, Laurie is narrating with a pitch changer on her voice, not quite the same as the album track. Still pretty cool.
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Sharky Punch is not bad, either. I mean, it isn’t anything fancy, just a Calvados high ball stretched out a bit with Canadian Whisky. Enjoyable enough. Definitely seems prohibition era, though, with the combination of spirits. No idea on the name. Maybe a bar or person?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sazerac Cocktail (Bitter Truth Creole Bitters)

Bonus Sazerac!

I challenged myself to post 28 Sazeracs in 28 days for the month of February, but I’m not quite done. We’ve got a few bonus Sazeracs coming up that didn’t fit into the month of February.

I’ll try some different spirits, try some out at bars, and have some friends make them for me.

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Sazerac Cocktail.
1 Lump of Sugar.
1 Dash Angostura or Peychana Bitters. (Or even better, Bitter Truth Creole Bitters!)
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (Or Cognac)

Stir well and strain into another glass that has been cooled and rinsed with 1 dash Absinthe and squeeze lemon peel on top.

The Bitter Truth is working on approval for the sale of a new product in the US called “Creole Bitters”. Based on a sampling of a pre-prohibition version of Peychaud’s, it is similar to Peychaud’s but distinct. To my taste, it has a stronger herbal component, and less bitter almond/cherry than modern Peychaud’s.

I guess the primary genesis for the product was that Peychaud’s, while fairly easy to come by in the US, can be quite difficult to find outside the country. And while the number of cocktails that call for Peychaud’s bitters is not particularly long, many of those that do are true classics: Sazerac, Vieux Carre, and Pendennis Club Special.

When I heard that Stephan Berg and Alexander Hauk were going to be bartending for a special event sponsored by Cask at Bourbon and Branch and that they would have their new Creole Bitters with them, how could I not stop by and ask for a Sazerac?

The proprietors at Bourbon and Branch, even bent the rules, and let me take a photo!

From my taste of their product in a Sazerac, I certainly hope it makes it through the approval process quickly.  My bottle of Peychaud’s is getting a bit low and after tasting the Creole bitters, I know which bitters I would like to buy next.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.