Sherry and Egg Cocktail

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Sherry and Egg Cocktail.
Place an Egg in Large Port Wine Glass, being careful not to break the yolk. Fill glass with Sherry (Solear Manzanilla Sherry).

Yep, that’s an egg in sherry. Wait, is that like a sherried, er, shired, egg? Breakfast of Champions?

This cocktail actually goes all the way back to Jerry Thomas’ Bartender’s Guide.

All the same, hm, of these sorts of whole raw egg cocktails, I have to say this was probably the least enjoyable so far. I hate to say it, but it sort of made the Prairie Hen seem appealing.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

23 thoughts on “Sherry and Egg Cocktail

  1. I was brought here by the 1944 thriller Dark Waters, in which a character serves a “sherry and egg,” a cocktail I had never heard of, but was instantly intrigued by. Looking it up on Bing, I came across your really delightful blog. I am definitely adding it to my bookmarks. Well done.

  2. oddly enough, my name is Joe and I just watched “Dark Waters” tonight and was also intrigued by the egg and sherry cocktail. In the film it is served to Merle Oberon for medicinal purposes by the evil antagonist. It looked so ominous!
    I googled it and found this site.
    I suppose in days of yore this combination was considered a “tonic”. I don’t think I could drink it without gagging.

  3. I just watched “The Plainsman” (1936) with Gary Cooper. The requested drink was Egg & Sherry but was made with whiskey. The drink was shaken in some kind of med-evil shaker. I was curious about this drink and found this site, thought i would add a bit.

  4. I just saw “The Plainsman” with Gary Cooper… and yea, a character ordered sherry and eggs but was given whiskey and an egg… that’s what brought me here. I wonder how it tastes… Glad to find your blog!

  5. I just read about it in Of Human Bondage. On Sundays the vicar depends on the power of a single egg for his sermon voice, and his maid having forgotten it resorts to this cocktail. I want to try it!!! But I don’t trust the egg enough, does the alcohol kill bacteria? Great idea for a blog by the way.

  6. I’m watching a Cecil B Demille movie called The Plainsman, and Calamity Jane just made a sherry & eggs for a customer, but it was shaken in a large, hand cranked shaker that emulsified the drink. Probably a lot better than not mixing them like your recipe. She shook in a few squirts of a dark liquid too, a type of bitters, probably, or ? Worth researching.

  7. I’m watching a Cecil B Demille movie called The Plainsman, and Calamity Jane just made a sherry & eggs for a customer (that’s how I ended up here, hadn’t heard of this combination before), but it was shaken in a large, hand cranked shaker that emulsified the drink. The machine alone is worth seeing the movie. It’s an early hand crank blender out in the wild west.

    I imagine that the emulsified method is probably a lot better than not mixing them like your recipe. She also shook in a few squirts of a dark liquid too, a type of bitters I would guess, or vinegar, or ?

    Worth researching.

  8. Sorry for the double post. It told me the first one didn’t go through.

    I didn’t read the comments before posting, but it was cool to see all the different movies that had brought people here. I’ll have to check those out too. Who knew a drink would be a reason to seek out a movie.

    I dont believe the booze in The Plainsman version of this drink was whiskey. She didn’t say it was whiskey, but there was an addition of the few squirts of a second liquid, bitters perhaps. Makes sense flavor wise and to help emulsify, but with that machine she uses, that thing would emulsify anything. It’s massive and made of some giant gears underneath a tray holding two lidded jars on top, one with water, other with the cocktail. It’s an amazing piece of machinery for the Black Hills in the Wild West days. Good movie too. I was just looking but ended up watching the whole thing.

  9. Come to think of it, the Prairie Blender had a flywheel. She cranked it for a few seconds and it kept going. That’s a pretty sophisticated machine for the Old West. Wonder if it was real, though I think it is. This was a really authentic looking movie, detail wise. From the Indian dances and dress to the rifles and many other things, it all looked right and with lots of detail.
    It was Cecil B. DeMille, eh?

  10. I was just watching Mexican Spitfire (1939). They ordered sherry and egg, and my google search brought me here. Sounds just awful! But thanks for the education.

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