Sand-Martin Cocktail

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Sand-Martin Cocktail
1 Teaspoonful Green Chartreuse. (1 Teaspoonful of Yellow Chartreuse)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica Italian Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Beefeater Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

In his pre-prohibition book “Cocktails: How to Mix Them,” Robert Vermeire notes regarding the “San Martin Cocktail”, “This well known South American drink must be well shaken. It contains no Bitters of any description, but: ½ gill of Gin; ½ gill of Italian Vermouth; 1 teaspoonful of Yellow Chartreuse; A little lemon peel is squeezed on top.”

Odd that Vermeire specifies the “San Martin” must be “well shaken”.

San Martin or Sand-Martin, I guess since this doesn’t have bitters, it really isn’t really a Martinez variation. More of a “Lone Tree” variation, I suppose. Well, however you decide to classify it, it is quite tasty, whether you make it with yellow or green chartreuse. Though I kind of lean towards yellow.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sanctuary Cocktail

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Sanctuary Cocktail*
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Amer Picon. (1/2 oz Torani Amer, er, well, Homemade version of Boudreau’s Amer Picon replica, actually. The Torani Amer bottle was just better looking.)
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

*So-called because the Savoy, together with The Clink, Deadman’s Place, Fulwood’s Rents, The Mint, Mitre Court, Baldwin’s Gardens and Stepney were the last places in London where the privilege of “Sanctuary ” existed. Unfortunately this privilege was abolished by in “The Escape from Prison Act” in 1697. But even to-day no Ladies are allowed in the Savoy’s inner American Cocktail Bar.

“The protection afforded by a sanctuary at common law a person accused of felony might fly for safeguard of to sanctuary and there within 40 days go clothed in sackcloth before the coroner confess the felony and take an oath of t lie realm whereby he undertook to quit the kingdom and not return without the king’s leave Upon was ipso facto convict of the felony suffered attainder and forfeited all his goods but had time allowed him his oath The abjurer started forth on his journey with a wooden cross bareheaded and clothed in a robe which made him conspicuous among medieval wayfarers He had to keep to the king’s highway was not remain more than two nights in any one place and his way to the coast quickly The time allowed for was not long In Edward III s reign only nine given an abjurer to travel on foot from Yorkshire to Dover.”

I believe this is a bit of a joke, conflating the legal right of “sanctuary” with the ability to go to a bar and avoid your wife.

The cocktail itself is better than I expected. The bitterness of the Amer Picon replica does a nice job in balancing out the sweetness of the Cointreau.

These sorts of drinks always seem very much like what would be drunk in a Cafe in France, as in the picon-citron-curacao from Marcel Pagnol’s movie “Marius”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.