Exploratorium: Science of Cocktails

I don’t know what “Meebo” is, but, oh my, this does sound right up my alley!

November 20, 2009

Dear Erik,

I thought you might be interested in the following information.  Images are available upon request.

Science of Cocktails
Wednesday, January 20, 2010
7-10pm

The Exploratorium transforms into a cocktail laboratory at Science of Cocktails.  Guest mixologists from 15 Romolo, 83 Proof, Orson, Alembic, Annabelle’s Bistro, and other popular San Francisco bars mix delicious cocktails, while guests participate in hands-on science experiments about alcohol, inebriation, hangovers, cocktail creation, and more.  Science of Cocktails presents the artistry of master mixologists shaken with the science behind the craft. Taking an in-depth, hands-on look at the physics, chemistry, and biology of cocktails, this first-time Exploratorium fundraising event engages guests in an exploration of their favorite libations like they’ve never experienced before.  This event is sponsored by Meebo.

General Admission — $50 +

Ticket includes hors d’oeuvres, one free cocktail, samples of all Science of Cocktails signature drinks, access to all Science of Cocktails programs and Exploratorium exhibits, discounted drink tickets for additional cocktails, and a free general admission pass for a future Exploratorium visit.

Top-Shelf Admission — $75 +

Ticket includes all general admission benefits plus access to our exclusive Top-Shelf lounge with special activities, cocktail offerings, and food, the opportunity to meet our guest bartenders and speakers, one additional free cocktail, and a Science of Cocktails gift bag.

Rose Cocktail (French Style Nos. 1-3)

As these Rose Cocktail (French Style) are all pretty much variations on the same thing, it seemed sensible to tackle them all in the same post.

The components seem to be booze (gin and/or kirsch), red sweet fluid (Cherry Heering, Grenadine, or Syrup Groseille) and French Vermouth.

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 1)

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 1)

1/4 Cherry Brandy. (1/2 oz Cherry Heering)

1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

The first of the French Rose Cocktails is the most “Martini-like”. Not bad, but a bit plain, along the lines of a slightly fruity Dry Gin Martini.

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 2)

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 2)

1/4 Cherry Brandy. (1/2 oz Cherry Heering)

1/4 Kirsch. (1/2 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

French Rose Cocktail No. 2 is the booziest, being 3/4 booze and 1/4 liqueur. If you make this, give it a good long stir. Even then, I didn’t find it all that appealing.

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 3)

1 Teaspoonful Grenadine.
1/2 French Vermouth.
1/2 Kirsch.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

That sounds OK, but looking through Harry McElhone’s “Barflies and Cocktails”, I found the following receipt:

Rose Cocktail (French Style No. 3)

Rose Cocktail

2/3 French Vermouth (1 1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/6 Kirschwasser (1/2 of 3/4 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
1/6 Syrup Groseille (1/2 oz 3/4 oz Homemade Grenadine).

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass, with cherry. Original Recipe by Johnny, of the Chatham Bar, Paris.

Now to me that is something interesting, along the lines of the Rose Cocktail (English Style) or the Chrysanthemum Cocktail. A nice, light, vermouth heavy cocktail, not overly sweet. With a good quality vermouth, this makes quite a pleasant appetizer, and it is more than worthwhile messing around with the proportions to find the exact ratio which is exactly to your taste.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.