Ray Long Cocktail

Ray Long Cocktail

Ray Long Cocktail.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Bitters)
4 Dashes Absinthe. (3 dashes Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
1/3 glass Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
2/3 Glass Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Gin)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Uh, oops! How did that happen? Somehow I got it into my head this was a Gin cocktail! Well, it’s really tasty, if you like Fourth Degree type things. Ahem. However, I guess I need to make it over!

Ray Long Cocktail

Ray Long Cocktail.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Bitters)
4 Dashes Absinthe. (3 dashes Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
1/3 glass Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
2/3 Glass Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Chateau de Pellehaut Armagnac Reserve)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Ok, that’s better, an Absinthe spiked Brandy Manhattan!

From a Time Magazine article from 1935:

The Press: Peak Passed

Of all the careers which reached their tragic peak in the fateful year 1929, none had been more exciting than Ray Long’s. A poor boy from a small town in Indiana, he had quickly made his mark in the newspaper business as “boy editor” of the Cincinnati Post and Cleveland Press. Then he splashed brilliantly into the fiction magazine field, running through the spectrum of Red Book, Bine Book, Green Book. On Armistice Day 1918, William Randolph Hearst succeeded, after several years’ dickering, in hiring Editor Long for his Cosmopolitan. In the eleven years that followed. Editor Long made a great success. Explaining “All I know is what I like,” he nevertheless showed an uncanny eye for the weather of public preference. When the public wanted Westerns, he gave it Curwood & Kyne. When it wanted Knowledge, he gave it Will Durant. When it wanted Russians, he gave it Russians. Prodigally sowing Big Names and New Names with talent in his slick and shiny monthly, Editor Long reaped a 1,700,000 circulation harvest in 1929. That was the year he printed perhaps his greatest coup: The Autobiography of Calvin Coolidge.

He would have been riding high in 1930, still 5 years from being found, “in his Beverly Hills bedroom…dead in his pajamas, a hole in the roof of his mouth, a small-bore rifle nearby.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.