Princeton Cocktail

Princeton Cocktail

Princeton Cocktail.
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura)
1/3 Port Wine. (3/4 oz Ficklin Tinta Port)
2/3 Tom Gin. (1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I thought that was pretty good. A sort of variation on the Martinez with Port instead of Sweet Vermouth. Lighter and a bit more winey. However, when I posted the picture of this drink on my flickr photostream, I got an unexpected comment from Michael Dietch (A Dash of Bitters)

I love this drink, but not made in this way. In Imbibe (the book, not the mag), Dave Wondrich has a variant in which he slides the port gently down the side of the cocktail glass, instead of stirring it all together. This way, the port layers underneath the gin, and gradually mixes with the gin as you drink.

I love when others do my research for me, especially those as erudite as Mr. Dietch!

And look how pretty it is when prepared in that way!

Princeton Cocktail*

*Hijacking this photo taken by Michael’s wife.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prince’s Smile Cocktail

Prince's Smile Cocktail

Prince’s Smile Cocktail.

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/4 Calvados or Apple Brandy. (1/2 oz Groult Calvados Reserve)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. Lemon Peel.

I’ve always maintained the the North Shore Distiller’s No. 6 is a great foil for apricot and lemon flavors. It does not disappoint here.

The Prince’s Smile bit like the a cross between the Dolly O’Dare and the Between the Sheets cocktails.  As fond as I am of Apple Brandy, this might even be an improvement over either one of those two classics.

To counter the sweetness of the apricot liqueur, you might want to be a tad generous with that “dash” of lemon juice.

Note the swank new Japanese Yarai mixing glass, which I ordered from Cocktail Kingdom.  Still trying to exactly get a handle on this puppy.  It seems to have an incredible amount of thermal density, which resulted in some drinks being more dilute and less cold than I wanted.  At this point, I really recommend pre-chilling this Mixing glasses, or it is going to suck a lot of cold out of your cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Princess Mary’s Pride Cocktail

Princess Mary's Pride Cocktail

Princess Mary’s Pride Cocktail.
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Dubonnet. (1/2 oz Dubonnet)
1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Groult Calvados Reserve)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Created by Harry Craddock on February 28, 1922, to mark the wedding celebrations of H.R.H Princess Mary.

Like the preceding Princess Mary, this was created to mark the wedding of H.R.H. Princess Mary. Nothing against Mr. McElhone’s cocktail, but this is about a zillion times better to me.

Being 2/3 aperitif wine, it is on the light side, but the flavorful Groult Calvados still pokes it’s head out, giving the drink a flavorful character.

Thoroughly enjoyable, this is one cocktail I suspect is better with Calvados than it would be with American Apple Brandy.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Princess Mary Cocktail

Princess Mary Cocktail

Princess Mary Cocktail.

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In his book, “Barflies and Cocktails,” Harry McElhone tells us, “This cocktail was introduced by myself in honour of Princess Mary’s wedding to Lord Lascelles, February, 1922.”

Not quite sure how to break it to him that this is pretty much just an Alexander (No. 1).

The Mozart Black Chocolate is their only non-cream based chocolate liqueur.  However, it is made with dark chocolate and fairly flavorful.  At least compared to many Creme de Cacao.  I suppose it is cheating slightly to use the Mozart in this drink.

However, with the Mozart Black Chocolate, this is not all bad.  I mean, if a slightly ginny glass of chocolate milk doesn’t sound “all bad” to you, this will likely appeal.  Surely better than the preceding Poppy Cocktail!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Princess Cocktail

Princess Cocktail

Princess Cocktail.

3/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)
(1 oz Osocalis Brandy)
1/4 Sweet Cream. (lightly whip and float on top)

Use liqueur glass and pour Cream carefully so that it does not mix.

Just having dreadful luck with pictures this night. Not sure what happened. Barely serviceable picture of both the last and this cocktail.

Uh right.

So, Princess or not, there was no way I was making this as written. 1 1/2 oz Apricot Brandy with a cream float? Oh bleah! As much as I like the Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot, this needed some taming.

A little real actual brandy was just the thing.

Not normally a big cream fan, but found this quite enjoyable. Probably a little nutmeg grated on top would have further embellished the pleasure.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Presto Cocktail

Presto Cocktail

Presto Cocktail.

1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)
1/6 Orange Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Orange Juice)
1/6 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Martini & Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
2/3 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Osocalis Brandy)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Harry McElhone also calls this the “Prestoman Cocktail”.  It is a bit like a cross between a Monkey Gland and a Bronx, or technically a Maurice, but made with Brandy instead of Gin.

Really quite enjoyable and recommendable for any occasion you happen to have quality orange juice hanging around the house.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Just Like STARTing Over

Big Feet.

We recently added a new member to our household, Mr. Monty Wooley. We adopted him from Wonder Dog Rescue without much information beyond him being somewhere around 6 months old.  We suspect he is some sort of Dachshund-Terrier mix, given his shape and how fond he is of sniffing just about everything in the world.

Michele and I have been talking about getting a dog for almost as long as we have been together, but it is still a pretty big adjustment to our (and our cats’) lives to be responsible for the health and happiness of this tiny terror.

The amusing part is that when you walk a little dog, you get to meet tons of people who normally wouldn’t even give you a second look.  We like to say we’ve met more people in our neighborhood in the last 3 months than we had in the previous 8 years of living in Bernal Heights.

So it’s pretty weird, as an anti-social curmudgeon who generally hates making small talk, to find myself chatting away with strangers about dogs, the weather, and what is going on in our neighborhood.

Likewise, working behind the bar has been stretching who I think I am in oddly similar ways to owning a dog.  Making small talk with strangers about both esoteric and pedestrian topics.

It really is sometimes strange where the coincidences and situations in life take you.

Currently, I find myself in a bit of new phase in my life.

The budget woes at the University of California have caused the administration to require that all employees take a certain number of unpaid furlough days a month.  In my case it would have been a bit more than two days a month.

I’ve been working as a bartender for what has amounted to a day or two a week since we opened Heaven’s Dog in January, so this time off isn’t really a huge crisis.  In fact, it will be kind of nice to only work 5 days a week!  I know, I’m an underachiever.

But when I was thinking about what to do with two free days a month, it occurred to me that it would be easier with the bar scheduling to take the same day off every week.

Luckily, the University also has another program to save itself payroll money, which allows employees to voluntarily take a certain percentage off of their jobs.  Starting a couple weeks ago, I reduced my University job to 4 days a week and at the same time convinced the bar manager at Heaven’s Dog to give me a regular shift at the bar.

Here’s to strange new adventures, dogs, and small talk!

President Cocktail

President Cocktail

President Cocktail.

2 Dashes Grenadine. (1/2 tsp. homemade grenadine)
The Juice of 1/4 Orange.
1 glass Bacardi Rum. (2 oz Mathusalem Platino)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze Orange peel over glass.)

This should be better than it is.  But I think the main problem is the lack of character in the Mathusalem Platino.  If ever there was a rum that is nearly vodka, this is it.  I can barely detect rum in any cocktail I make with it.

I dunno, maybe if you had really good oranges and the best homemade grenadine evar (or small hand foods grenadine) this might be worth experimenting with.

As it is, it’s basically a screwdriver.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prairie Oyster Cocktail

Prairie Oyster Cocktail

Prairie Oyster Cocktail.

2 Dashes Vinegar. (Malt Vinegar)
The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Worcestershire Sauce. (From the UK!)
1 Teaspoonful Tomato Catsup. (Chefs Brand Ketchup)
1 Dash of Pepper on Top.

Do not break the Yolk of Egg.

Similar to the Prairie Hen, but only the yolk this time.

While I will recommend you serve this with a shot back, I don’t really get what the big deal is.

It’s just a raw egg, is that so terrifying?

Man (or Woman) up, fer cripes sake!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Prairie Hen Cocktail

Prairie Hen Cocktail

Prairie Hen Cocktail.

2 Dashes Vinegar.
1 Teaspoonful Worcestershire Sauce.
1 Egg.
2 Dashes Tabasco Sauce.
A little Pepper and Salt.

Do not break the Egg.

Yuppers, that’s a whole egg with some stuff dashed on.

Irish Supplies

In the spirit of making the most authentic Savoy Prairie Hen possible, I traveled out to the Roxy Grocery Store in the sunset where they sell Irish and British goods.  Picked up some UK malt vinegar, some UK Worcestershire, and some Chef Brand Ketchup.

Having armored myself with these bastions of quality, I cracked the egg into the glass, dashed on the ingredients, and sucked it down.

I really do recommend chasing it with a shot of whiskey.  Or maybe tequila.  Disinfectant properties and all.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.