Poker Cocktail

Poker Cocktail

Poker Cocktail.
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Havana Club 7 Year)
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I decided to not gamble too much with the Poker Cocktail and upped the ante with Punt e Mes and an aged rum.

While I wouldn’t call this exactly a royal flush or four of a kind, it certainly beats a pair of deuces, hands down.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

BOTW–Mousquetaires Rauchbier

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This is another beer from the Plump Jack Beer Club.  I’ve belonged to this club for several years now, and the organizer never fails to find something interesting new for me to try.  Rauchbiers are an acquired taste for some.  Like Islay Scotch, the Malt is dried over an open fire, lending a smoky character.  Being very fond of Alaskan Brewing’s Smoked Porter and Stone Brewing’s Smoked Porter, I was quite looking forward to this beer from the Les Trois Mousquetaires Brewery in Quebec.

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Interestingly, the Trois Mousequetaires Brewery started when Imperial Tobacco of Canada shut down its Montreal locations, sending the three founders into a quest for a new source of income and inspiration.

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The beer is nice, not as smoky as some German Rauchbier, but enough to take notice.  According to the information I have, they use partly smoked malt and the beer is then cold aged and bottled unfiltered.  Pours with a healthy head and is a bit on the sweet side.  Nicely Porter-esque and a perfect accompaniment to a honking big slab of…

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When I was heading home from work on Friday, I stopped at Avedano’s to pick up something to grill.  Like the Plump Jack Beer club, Avedano’s never fails to have something interesting which inspires me to cook.  It was truly far too hot outside to think of turning on the oven or even the stove top.  They had some beautiful dry aged ribeye that I just couldn’t resist.  Ribeye is just about my favorite easily available steak.  Well, OK, bone in, thick cut ribeye is my absolute favorite.  But since I was on my own for dinner, that would be a bit over the top.

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Grilling steaks always reminds me of growing up in Wisconsin.  My parents would often buy half a cow from the local butcher and then freeze most of the meat, giving us steaks and summer sausage for a good portion of the year.  The old adage, “Dad Cooks Outside, Mom Cooks Inside,” always held true.  While Dad got the coals going, Mom would peel and slice potatoes, chop plenty of onions and wrap them in foil with plenty of butter, salt, and pepper.  These would then be cooked over the coals outside.  When they were done, they would be spooned into a bowl.  My favorite bits were always the browned and caramelized potatoes that stuck to the foil.

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Nothing more than salt, pepper, and a little bit of olive oil, for a ribeye this nice! Not the best job of cross hatching, but not bad for cooking on a Weber!

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Really that does seem like a lot of potatoes and a big steak.  I hope I can finish them!

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OK, well, I finished the potatoes.  Half the steak will make a nice sandwich for lunch tomorrow!

Plaza Cocktail

Plaza Cocktail

Plaza cocktail.
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Sarticious Gin)
1 Slice of pineapple. (1/2 oz Pineapple Juice)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again, hitting another of the pretty much extinct vaguely exotic martini variations.

Neglected to get a pineapple, so substituted a half ounce of juice. The Sarticious seemed like an interesting choice, given the semi-tropical nature of the cocktail.

I was initially thinking, “pineapple in a perfect martini, how can that be good?” But you know, it’s not bad. Fairly subtle, it must be admitted, but an interesting enough variation. Not something I’ll probably make again, but certainly more interesting than you think.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Planter’s Cocktail (No. 2)

Planter's Cocktail No. 2

Planter’s Cocktail (No. 2)
1/4 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Syrup. (3/4 oz Rich Simple Syrup)
1/2 Jamaica Rum. (3/4 oz Mount Gay XO, 3/4 oz Wray & Nephew White Overproof)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Planter’s Cocktail
Note: This drink is greatly favoured by Planters, particularly in Jamaica where Rum is good and cheap.

Well, figured I should use a “good and cheap” Jamaica Rum for this one. Wray & Nephew Overproof seemed like the trick, but couldn’t quite face using it alone so cut it with a an equal part of Mount Gay XO I’d gotten through my association with the CSOWG.

The Mount Gay XO, by the way, is pretty enjoyable for an industrial rum.  Nice sipper and makes a fantastic rum old-fashioned.

In general, we liked Planter’s Cocktail No. 2 better than No. 1, though it was a tad sweet. A half ounce of the rich simple would have been plenty.

It’s funny, one of my first drink quests was for the Planter’s Punch.  I had a good one early on, but then realized soon after that no two bartenders seemed to make the same drink when asked to make a Planter’s Punch.  About all they seemed to have in common was Myer’s Jamaican Rum.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Planter’s Cocktail (No. 1)

Planter's Cocktail (No. 1)

Planter’s Cocktail (No. 1).
1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1/2 Orange Juice. (1 1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/2 Rum. (1 1/2 oz Coruba Rum)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Planter’s Cocktail.
This drink is greatly favoured by Planters, particularly in Jamaica where Rum is good and cheap.

Well, with a quote like that, I felt like I should go with Jamaican Rum, but not too fancy. Coruba sprung to mind.

Giving this to some friends to try, they were surprised at how dry and rummy this cocktail is. After all, it is basically just rum and oj.

Interestingly, in “Barflies and Cocktails”, Harry McElhone tarts this puppy out a bit more, recommending an equal parts cocktail, “1/3 Rum; 1/3 Orange Juice; 1/3 Lemon Juice.”

Not bad, either way, but a bit austere.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

BOTW-Rip Tide

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Recently our local grocery has started carrying beer from a small Scottish Brewery called “Brew Dog”. Fond as I am of Stouts, I’ve been curious about their Rip Tide Imperial Stout.

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Martin and James were bored of the industrially brewed lagers and stuffy ales that dominate the UK market. We decided the best way to fix this undesirable predicament was to brew our own beers. Consequently in April 2007 BrewDog was born.

Both only 24 at the time, we leased a building, got some scary bank loans, spent all our money on stainless steel and started making some hardcore beers.

We are dedicated to making cool, contemporary and progressive beers showcasing some of the world’s classic beer styles. All with an innovative twist and customary BrewDog bite.

Well, that’s cool.

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With Mrs. Flannestad away for the weekend, I’d not done real well on the whole feeding myself front this weekend. Figured I should at least give it a go tonight.

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Got some nice Salmon and Fingerling potatoes at Avedano’s. Fennel and Kale at Good Life. So… Thinly sliced fingerling potatoes, fennel, and chiffonade of tuscan kale. Some olive oil and cream. Idea is a quick gratin. Tossed in the oven at 400 F.

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Salmon fillet, with a rub, garnish, I don’t know what you call it… Mustard, finely minced onion, thyme, tarragon, lemon zest, splash of vermouth, olive oil.  We used to make a main course something like this at a restaurant I worked in.

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Hm. Rip Tide is tasty, but more of a UK style Porter than an Imperial Stout. OK. But doesn’t quite have the backbone to stand up to the alcohol level.

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Salmon on top of the mostly cooked gratin. Oven at 425 F.

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Sorry for the focus. Really this was one of the more successful and interesting dishes I’ve cooked recently. Nice textural contrast. Crispy potatoes and kale at the edges. Delicious rich salmon towards the middle.

Just hope I can make it again once Mrs. Flannestad gets back!

Plain Vermouth Cocktail

Plain Vermouth Cocktail

Plain Vermouth Cocktail.
(6 People)
5 1/2 Glasses French Vermouth. (2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1 Teaspoonful Absinthe Bitters. (1 Dash Absinthe)
1 dessertspoonful Maraschino. (1 Dash Maraschino)
Shake (I stirred) very thoroughly and serve with a (Luxardo!) cherry.

A lot like the Chrysanthemum cocktail, this is a relatively pleasing light aperitif beverage. Or if you’re off kilter and need something in a drinking session relatively low alcohol to get you back on the path towards pleasant drunken-ness.

Again, sticking with plain old Absinthe for the “Absinthe Bitters” in this cocktail. I don’t know that breaking out the Gin and Wormwood makes much sense here.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Plain Sherry Cocktail

Plain Sherry Cocktail

Plain Sherry Cocktail.
(6 People)
Pour into the shaker 6 glasses of Sherry (Bodega Dios Baco Amontillado Sherry), a few drops of Absinthe Bitters (generous drop Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe), and a few drops of Maraschino (generous drop Luxardo Maraschino). Shake (I stirred) very thoroughly and serve.

Odd quest for Sherry this time around. I’d lately been enjoying a Lustau Dry Oloroso where sherry was called for, but that bottle was getting a bit tired, so I forced myself to finish it off.

Figured it would be a piece of cake to find a decent Amontillado or similar. Heck, I’ve been buying the Lustau Amontillado since I was in college, how hard should that be to find?

Kind of hard, it turns out. Why on earth is it most upscale grocery stores have a better sherry selection than most liquor stores? Heck, I even visited the esteemed John Walker and Co downtown and they didn’t have a single bottle of Sherry. What is up with that? Has Dominic Venegas stolen it all for Gitane?

Fine, grocery stores, then. Both Andronico’s and Tower Market’s sherry selection kicked most liquor stores’ sherry (non!) selection in the ass, anyway.

Back to the cocktail, obviously, this isn’t going to make a non-sherry drinker turn their head, but for the rest of us, here’s another nice, light aperitif cocktail for those times when the booze just seems a bit much.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pinky Cocktail

Pinky Cocktail

Pinky Cocktail.

The White of 1 Egg.
1/2 Grenadine. (1 oz homemade)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Same again as the Pink Lady, with more Grenadine. Actually, despite being very sweet, I found the Pinky preferable to the Savoy Pink Lady. Still not something I’m going to be revisiting any time again soon!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pink Rose Cocktail

Pink Rose Cocktail

Pink Rose Cocktail.

The White of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (homemade)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice.
1 Teaspoonful Sweet Cream.
2/3 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Hmm… Not much egg white foam here. I think my eggs might be getting a bit old.

In any case, not sure exactly what to call this. It’s almost a peach blow fizz without the soda.

To be honest, it’s kind of good, albeit heavy on the gin. I’ll take it over most of the previous Lemon-free pink ladies any day.

All the same, it would be better as a fizz.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.