Peter Pan Cocktail

Peter Pan Cocktail

Peter Pan Cocktail.

1/4 Peach Bitters. (1/2 oz Fee’s Peach Bitters)
1/4 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz Orange Juice)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I had some sort of idle hope that this would be at least interesting.

I suppose, after a fashion, it is.

The nice thing about it is the Peter Pan is, at least, a fairly dry cocktail. However, it really does taste, more or less, awful. That much peach bitters is just wrong.

Not only that, but I felt kind of bad after drinking it. Burping peach flavored burps, and feeling like it gave me an instant head ache. Maybe all that glycerine and propylene glycol doesn’t agree with me.

Should you order this cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

Signs point to a definite, “No!”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Personality a La Roy Cocktail

Personality a la Roy

Personality a La Roy Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/4 Hercules. (1/2 oz Underhill Hercules version 3)
1/4 Applejack or Calvados. (1/2 oz Calvados Groult Reserve)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake (I stirred) well as strain into cocktail glass.

Actually gotten pretty good response both to Underhill Hercules Version 3 and to this cocktail made with it. Not sure where to go from here. Expand the spice component? I think I could slightly enhance the bitter elements as long as I continue to skip Wormwood.

The name is a bit odd, but I have no idea who Roy might have been and what about his personality might have attracted the name of this cocktail?

Perhaps South African poet Roy Campbell? The time is about right for whatever fame he might have generated for himself in South Africa and England.

Here’s an amusing section from his wikipedia entry, circa 1930 or so:

Roy Campbell (poet)

“…moving in literary circles, he was initially on friendly terms with the Bloomsbury Group but then became very hostile to them; he declared that they were sexually promiscuous, snobbish, and anti-Christian. His wife’s lesbian affair with Vita Sackville-West, the lover of Virginia Woolf, was a contributing cause to his changed attitude.”

Oh Vita, with her long legs, wolfhounds, and gardens. Who could resist?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Perfect Cocktail

Perfect Cocktail

Perfect Cocktail

1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Original Dry)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Punt e Mes)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Anchor Junipero Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, after all that Pegu Club nonsense, it certainly is good to get back on solid ground!

Since the recipe is lacking bitters, I chose to use the more bitter vermouth, Punt e Mes. In fact, so bitter, some authors classify it as a Quinquina!

Well, it works in this cocktail in a quite a wonderful way, providing some bitter backbone to what might be a bit routine other wise. Of course, it never hurts to throw Junipero into the mix, especially in fifty-fifty type drinks. Or in this case, 33.3-33.3-33.3 type drinks!

Sometimes simpler and less complicated can be good.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pegu Club Cocktail

First, I suppose I should point out that Doug, over at The Pegu Blog, writes pretty much about nothing other than Pegu Club Cocktails.  So if you need more information about the cocktail, you might want to check out his ruminations on the subject.

Searching through Google Books, I found a couple references.

From a 1971 article in the Atlantic by Paul Theroux:

Burma

“On Bogyoke Aung San Street (formerly Montgomery) the Central Jail is being pulled down. The workmen were surprised to get a visitor and willingly showed me around the six enormous cell blocks which radiate in clumsy spokes from a central courtyard and administration building. They pointed out scratchings on the cell floors made in the teak planks by bored prisoners, the Burmese equivalent of tic-tac-toe. One man told me the place was one hundred seven years old—the seven gave the date a certain credibility; in fact, I couldn’t imagine the Burmese pulling down a building less than a hundred years old. The only market in Mandalay is the Zegyo Bazaar, designed and built in 1903 by an Italian, Count Caldrari (who was also the first secretary of the Mandalay Municipality). I stole a small sign from over a cell door in the Central Jail. It reads: 56′ BY 26½’ BY 12′—CUBICAL CONTENTS 17967—ACCOMMODATION FOR 28. It is only a short hop from the Central Jail to the Pegu Club, now an Officers’ Mess of the Burmese Army. The Pegu Club was to Rangoon what the Selangor Club was to Kuala Lumpur and the Tanglin Club to Singapore (but these two are still going strong). The sentry said that he would have let me look around, but as it happened, a senior officer (the sentry bulged his eyes to illustrate how senior) had just arrived and was inside.”

Rudyard Kipling in his 1899 book, “From Sea to Sea”:

The River of the Lost Footsteps and the Golden Mystery upon its Banks. Shows how a Man may go to the Shway Dagon Pagoda and see it not and to the Pegu Club and hear too much. A Dissertation on Mixed Drinks.

“There must be a few hundred men who are fairly behind the scenes of the Burma War—one of the least known and appreciated of any of our little affairs. The Pegu Club seemed to be full of men on their way up or down, and the conversation was but an echo of the murmur of conquest far away to the north.”

Pegu Club, Savoy

Pegu Club Cocktail
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Teaspoonful Lime Juice. (1 teaspoon Fresh Lime Juice)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The favourite cocktail of the Pegu Club, Burma,
and one that has traveled, and is asked for, round the world.

So this is the Savoy recipe for this cocktail. To me, it doesn’t make much sense, from a flavor perspective. The mere teaspoon of lime juice, does very little for the cocktail, to balance against the sweetness of the orange curacao, making it very nearly an after dinner proposition.

Pegu Club, Gimlet Style

The oldest recipe anyone has found, at the moment, is from an edition of Harry’s ABC of Cocktails from 1929.  It is as follows: 1 dash Angostura Bitters; 1 dash of Orange Bitters; 1 teaspoonful of Lime Juice (Rose’s); 1/6 Curacao; 2/3 Gin.

Ack!  Though he does slightly reduce the volume of Curacao, he calls for Rose’s Lime Juice!

Well, what are you gonna do.  The Rose’s got me thinking of Gimlets, so I gimlet-i-fied the cocktail, serving it over ice.  You know what, it’s not bad!

Pegu Club, Jimmy's

One of the other pre-Savoy citations for the Pegu Club Cocktail comes from a book I’ve only heard of in quotes from David Wondrich, “Cocktails by Jimmy, Late of Ciro’s”  Its recipe follows:

Pegu Club
4 parts Dry Gin. (2 oz Gin)
1 part Curacao. (1/2 oz Curacao)
1 part Lime Juice. (1/2 oz Lime Juice)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters per cocktail.
1 Dash Orange Bitters per cocktail. (Angostura Orange Bitters)

This is a very dry cocktail!  Though it has its fans, it is a little too dry and tart for my taste.  At this point, I have to admit I’m also thinking I don’t really like Angostura Orange Bitters in this cocktail.  I like them in Martinis and such, but there’s something in the spice component that just isn’t working for me in a sour.

Pegu Club, Slanted Door

Finally, seeking solace for my frustration, I made the version of the Pegu Club Cocktail from the Heaven’s Dog bar book.  Obviously, I’d have to kill you if I printed it here, but damn that hits the spot.  Save yourself the trouble of the above, and just go out and order the drink at Slanted Door or Heaven’s Dog.  You’ll thank me.

Oh, and if that doesn’t convince you, and you really want to do your extra credit work, I highly recommend the gimlet-i-fied version made with Oude Genever instead of Dry Gin. Not at all traditional, but super tasty!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Peggy Cocktail

Peggy Cocktail

Peggy Cocktail.

1 Dash Absinthe. (Absinthe Verte de Fougerolles)
1 Dash Dubonnet. (Dubonnet Rouge)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Original Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

There are a couple cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book that call for Dubonnet Rouge in “dash” proportions. I had heard that the French version of Dubonnet Rouge was distinct from the American version, so assumed it might have more bitter character. I thought maybe that might explain using it in such small proportions.

However, I recently had a chance to try the French version of Dubonnet Rouge. While it did seem to be a nicer product, with maybe a slightly higher quality wine base, it was really not much different at all in terms of overall taste and bitterness. While it is possible that both products may have evolved over time, I suspect that the dash of Dubonnet here is just providing a slight rosy hue.

In any case, this is a pleasant, if not outstanding, cocktail.  A slightly richer, and pinker, version of a dry martini.

As Mrs. Flannestad and I are still making our way through the second season of Mad Men, the name of this cocktail reminds me a bit of the always conflicted Peggy on that show.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pauline Cocktail

Pauline Cocktail

Pauline Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Rum. (1 1/2 oz Barbancourt White Rum)
3 Glasses Sweetened Lemon Juice. (1 oz Lemon Juice, 1/2 oz Rich Simple Syrup)
1 Dash Absinthe Bitters.  (1 Dash Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
A little Nutmeg, grated.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I tried this one both with Gin and Wormwood and plain old Absinthe. I found I preferred the regular Absinthe.

Since it doesn’t specify what type of rum to use here, and I’ve really been digging Barbancourt’s white rum lately, I chose to use it in this cocktail. Barbancourt’s rums are produced from Cane Juice so they have a bit of flavor in common with the Rhum Agricoles from Martinique and elsewhere. However, their white rum has less of the harshness and funk of the white rums from those areas.

Proves to work quite well in this Daiquiri-like cocktail.

No idea who the eponymous Pauline might have been, but I like her taste in cocktails!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pat’s Special Cocktail

Pat's Special Cocktail

Pat’s Special Cocktail.
(6 People)
Put 2 Glasses of Gin (1 oz Sarticious Gin) , 2 of Sherry (1 oz Don Nuno Dry Oloroso Sherry) and 2 of Quinquina (1 oz Dubonnet Rouge) in the shaker; add 2 dashes of Crème de Cassis (dash Brizard Creme de Cassis) and 2 of Abricotine (dash Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot). Shake well and serve with a (Luxardo) cherry and a piece of orange peel.

I’m still unsure about “Quinquina” used generically as an ingredient. Dubonnet Rouge is definitely a Quinquina. Just not sure if it is what is called for in cocktails that use the actual word.

I’ve been playing, off and on, with the Sarticious Gin, and enjoy it. I can’t find much information about the company that makes it. I guess it is in Santa Cruz and the owner also runs the Alexander Cellars Winery. Beyond that, their use of non-traditional botanicals like Cilantro has gained them some attention.

Anyway, for some reason, I thought of it for this cocktail.

Kind of a kitchen sink recipe, as far as ingredients go, but fairly enjoyable. The Cassis and Apricot liqueur end up being more hinted at than actually present in the flavor profile of the cocktail. Mostly I get slightly exotic tasting Sherry and Gin. Enjoyable enough to make again.

Gotta say thanks to the Shabbanigans for sending out this lovely cocktail shaker. I promise to use it in good faith and hope to see you soon!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Parisian Blonde Cocktail

Parisian Blonde Cocktail

Parisian Blonde Cocktail.

1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Sweet Cream)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Cartron Curacao Triple Sec)
1/3 Jamaica Rum. (3/4 oz Appleton Extra)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.  (Well, no.  Using a Milk Frother, whip cream until slightly thickened.  Stir rum and curacao with ice to chill.  Strain into cocktail glass.  Carefully pour lightly thickened cream over the back of a spoon to float on top.  Garnish with finely grated cinnamon.)

As in the Panama Cocktail, again deploying the Clover Club method of agitating the cream separately from the other ingredients, then spooning on top.  Done that way, this is an enjoyable after dinner cocktail, along the lines of a Brandy Alexander.

Cartron Curacao Triple Sec

Found the Cartron Curacao at a liquor store in Napa.  May be my new favorite orange liqueur.  Nice complex intense orange flavor, good proof level, and very little harshness or burn.

Cartron Curacao Back Label

The interesting part, here, is that the name of the product uses both “Curacao” and “Triple Sec”, hearkening back to the origins of orange liqueurs.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.