Picon Cocktail

Picon Cocktail

Picon Cocktail.

1/2 Italian Vermouth. (generous 1 oz Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
1/2 Amer Picon. (generous 1 oz Zwack)

Shake well and strain cocktail glass. (Garnish with orange wheel.)

As is my wont, I did build this vermouth heavy cocktail over ice, instead of the whole shaking and straining thing.

Again taking Mr. Jonny Raglin’s advice and substituting Zwack for Amer Picon, and darn it if I didn’t enjoy this cocktail even more than the previous Picon Grenadine Cocktail.

For more information about Zwack, check out Mr. Darcy O’Neil’s recent article over at Art of Drink: Hussar Sour

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Picon Grenadine Cocktail

Picon Grenadine Cocktail

Picon and Grenadine Cocktail.

1 Liqueur Glass Amer Picon. (1 1/2 oz Zwack)
1/2 Liqueur Glass Grenadine. (3/4 oz Homemade)

Use medium size glass (add ice) and fill with soda water. (Orange wheel garnish.)

Chatting with Mr. Jonny Raglin the other week at Absinthe, he mentioned a new enthusiasm for Zwack. He also mentioned he thought it made a really great substitute for Amer Picon.

When I get cocktail advice from someone like Jonny, I always feel like I better take it!

So here we are making a “Picon Grenadine Cocktail” with Zwack, and damn if he isn’t right! Zwack makes a fine and tasty substitute for Amer Picon.

I would certainly never, ever, be tempted to add the ounce, or so, of, oh, Osocalis Brandy that would turn this into a legendary Picon Punch.  Never.  Nope.  Not a chance.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Piccadilly Cocktail

Piccadilly Cocktail

Piccadilly Cocktail.
1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)
1 Dash Grenadine. (Homemade)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater 24)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into a cocktail glass.

Like the Phoebe Snow, there’s nothing particularly deep going on here. A slightly pink Martini with a dash of Absinthe. Still, absolutely nothing wrong with a pink Martini, as long as you are secure in your manhood.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Piccad Cocktail

Piccad Cocktail

Piccad Cocktail.
3 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
1/2 Caperitif. (1 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11 Gin)
Shake well with two or three pieces of lemon rind and strain.

Still no real idea what Caperitif might have been, beyond a rich yellow quinquina, similar in character to vermouth.

Dolin Blanc, though a bit sweet, remains my current favorite substitution. And one of my current favorite vermouths. With its relatively large proportion of bitters (3 dashes!) this is a great cocktail to showcase both the character of angostura as a flavoring and that of Dolin Blanc.

Happy to report that North Shore’s products are now starting to show up in some liquor stores and bars! Even the Distiller’s No. 11, which remains one of my favorite new American gins.

Should you order this cocktail at tomorrow’s Savoy Night at Alembic Bar?

Did I mention this is a great cocktail?  Yes?  Well, let me just say it again, “this is a great cocktail!”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Mud Puddle Bonanza!

Mud Puddle Bonanza!

Woo! My order from Cocktail Kingdom arrived today!

Reprints of Vermeire, Ensslin, Straub, Maier, Kappelar, and home boy Boothby!

Japanese tins, some beautiful heavy mixing glasses, and even a bonus spoon!

Thanks Greg Boehm and Company, you are truly doing amazing things for the cocktail community.

PS. Ahem, the Aviation recipe in Hugo Ensslin’s book calls for Creme de Violette, not Creme Yvette!

Phoebe Snow Cocktail

Phoebe Snow Cocktail

Phoebe Snow Cocktail.

1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Osocalis Alambic Brandy)
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 oz Dubonnet Rouge)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Felt like it needed a Cherry.)

Nothing complicated here; but an enjoyable cocktail all the same.

Interestingly, like Aunt Jemina and Betty Crocker, Phoebe Snow was a fictional character created as a part of an advertising campaign.

“Phoebe Snow, the “maid in white” who promoted the smoke-free anthracite coal used on the Lackawanna Railroad, was the brainchild of one of advertising’s earliest creative geniuses, Earnest Elmo Calkins.”

So successful was the character that the Lackawanna Railroad named its first stream lined passenger train after her in 1949.

However, as with all things railroad, in later years mounting losses took their toll.

“Still, despite fine service and great views, as with the rest of the railroad industry, the Phoebe Snow could not stave off increasing losses as passengers took to their cars and the air for faster, more efficient means of travel. With the loss of the US Postal Service mail contracts in 1966 the Erie Lackawanna decided it was time to retire the Phoebe for good and she made her last run on November 28th of that year.”

Should you order this cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

If you’re looking for an uncomplicated before dinner aperitif, I’d give it a, “why not?”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Philomel Cocktail

Philomel Cocktail

Philomel Cocktail*
(6 People)
2 1/2 glasses of Sherry. (1 1/4 oz Don Nuno Dry Oloroso Sherry)
1 Glass Rum. (1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)
1 1/2 Glasses Quinquina. (3/4 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
1 1/2 Glasses Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Orange Juice)

Give one grind of the peppermill over this Shake: serve!

*After which they all sing like nightingales. Whence the name.

Whence the name?

Woo, now that’s a story.

From the wikipedia:

Procne’s husband, king Tereus of Thrace (son of Ares), agreed to travel to Athens and escort Philomela to Thrace for a visit. Tereus lusted for Philomela on the voyage. Arriving in Thrace, he forced her to a cabin in the woods and raped her…Philomela then wove a tapestry (or a robe) that told her story and had it sent to Procne. In revenge, Procne killed her son by Tereus, Itys (or Itylos), and served him to Tereus, who unknowingly ate him. When he discovered what had been done, Tereus tried to kill the sisters; they fled and he pursued but, in the end, all three were changed by the Olympic Gods into birds…Early Greek sources have it that Procne was turned into a nightingale, singing a beautiful but sad song in remorse for the death of her son; Philomela turns into a swallow, which has no song.

For some inexplicable reason, Philomel ends up being another name for the nightingale.

And, uh, well, like the Golden Slipper, that’s an odd myth to want to evoke with a cocktail!

That said, this isn’t an awful cocktail.  Odd, it must be admitted, but rum, dubonnet, and sherry is an interesting flavor combination.  I used the overproof, funk filled, and sadly no longer distributed in the US, Inner Circle Green, as it needed to stand up to all the rest of the ingredients in as a relatively small fraction of the cocktail.  It worked quite well.  Another interesting choice might be a spiced rum, if there were actually any of those worth drinking.

Maybe the New Orleans Cajun Spiced rum?  Would fit right in with the grind of black pepper!

Should you order this cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

Signs point to a definite, “Hmmm.  Let’s think about that before ordering.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Philadelphia Scotsman Cocktail

Philadelphia Scotsman Cocktail

Philadelphia Scotsman Cocktail.

1 Hooker Applejack. (1 1/2 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1 Hooker Port. (1 1/2 oz Sandeman 10 Year Tawny Port)
The Juice of 1 Orange. (2 oz Fresh Orange Juice)

Place in tumbler (with ice, stir,) and fill up with ginger ale (Fentiman’s Ginger Beer).

Well, OK, Fentiman’s Ginger Ale is a pretty odd substitution for “Ginger Ale”. However, this is a “Philadelphia Scotsman” cocktail. Presumably, in Philadelphia, they’d be mixing home made ginger beer, not some fancy carbonated “ginger ale”. And tawny port is probably a bit of a stretch, too. Presumably, a ruby port or similar would be more common.

Should you order this cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

You know, this is pretty darn tasty, if you ask me. If it’s warm outside, this would make a very good hot weather drink.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Shopping List

Shopping List for today

2 Bottles Osocalis Brandy.
1 Bottle Appleton V/X.
1 Bottle Coruba Rum.
1 Bottle Batavia Arrack von Osten.
12 Lemons.
2 pineapples.
Florida Crystals Sugar.
2 quart Straus Family Creamery Whole Milk.
Sealable non reactive glass jars big enough to hold more than 4 Liters.

Peto Cocktail

Peto Cocktail

Peto Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (About a half an ounce of Fresh Squeezed)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso Vermouth)
1/2 Plymouth gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (2/3 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Another Bronx-ish cocktail and another Brunch possibility. Nicely refreshing with the touch of exoticism from the Maraschino. Nothing fantastic, but enjoyable.

I would guess the name of the cocktail refers to someone’s name. Painter John Frederick Peto, perhaps?

The subject matter of Peto’s paintings consisted of the most ordinary of things: pistols, horseshoes, bits of paper, keys, books, and the like. He frequently painted old time “letter racks,” which were a kind of board that used ribbons tacked into a square that held notes, letters, pencils, and photographs.

Hard to say if he enjoyed the odd drink.

We’ve also got railway and harbor developer Sir Samuel Morton Peto, an acquaintance of Charles Dickens.

Peto is also another name for the fish more commonly called “Wahoo“.

a large, swift mackerel, Acanthocybium solanderi, widespread in warm seas, of a steel blue to greenish blue above and silver below, often leaping from the water and occasionally schooling in great numbers: valued as a food and game fish.

Take your pick.

Should you order the Peto cocktail at the next Savoy Night at Alembic Bar, July 26th?

I would give this a, “Maybe.”  It is refreshing and interesting.  You could definitely do a lot worse.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.