Parisian Cocktail

Parisian Cocktail

Parisian Cocktail.

1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Original Dry)
1/3 Crème de Cassis. (3/4 oz Brizard Creme de Cassis)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Nothing particularly earth shattering here in another Cocktail likely sourced from the 1929 edition of Harry’s McElhone’s “Harry’s ABC of Cocktails”. How enjoyable this cocktail is to you will likely wholly depend on how interesting you find your bottling of Creme de Cassis.

However, the Parisian is definitely a cocktail with “good bones”. For an up cocktail, you might just adjust the proportions slightly and come up with something outstanding.

I do sometimes wonder if some of the cocktails, like the Parisian, lost their soda in translation. Or if they were adaptions of French drinks for American Bars.

Building something like Cassis, gin, and vermouth in a glass and then topping it up with soda just seems so very French.

Not to mention, build it over crushed ice and you’re a dash of lemon juice away from something like Dick Bradsell’s famous Bramble.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Paradise Cocktail

Paradish Cocktail

Paradise Cocktail.

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1/4 Orange Juice. (1/2 oz fresh squeezed Orange Juice)
1/2 Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman and Winter Orchard Apricot)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sadly, nothing particularly amazing or fantastic going on here in the Paradise, but what do they say? “Heaven is a place where nothing ever happens.” This version of paradise is a refreshing and enjoyable cocktail and not much more. Strikes me as kind of non-threatening and brunchy.

Crap, I should be keeping a list of these Screwdriver, Mimosa, and Bloody Mary replacements, so I can order them the next time I have brunch at a cocktail bar. Hear that Clover Club? I’m looking at you!

;-)

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pantomime Cocktail

Pantomime Cocktail

Pantomime Cocktail.

1 Dash Orgeat Syrup. (1/3 tsp. Homemade)
1 Dash Grenadine. (1/3 tsp. Homemade)
The White of 1 Egg.
1 Liqueur Glass French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Noilly Original Dry)

Shake (without ice for 10 seconds.  Add ice, shake) well and strain into medium size glass.  (Garnish with drops of angostura bitters and grated nutmeg.)

Kind of odd to have egg white in a cocktail without lemon, but there you go.

I found the Pantomime an interesting and fairly enjoyable light cocktail.  Heck, you could even make this at a bar without a full liquor license!  Of course it is an awful lot of work to go for very little “bang”, if you know what I mean.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Milk Punch No. 1

You may remember that a couple weeks ago I made a Hibiscus Milk Punch based on a recipe I read on another blog.

The whole thing was a bit of a leap of faith, given I’d never made anything similar or even tried it.

However, it turned out so well, I thought I should turn back the clock a bit further and investigate an older recipe for Milk Punch. So when Daniel Hyatt suggested we make some punches for one of our Savoy Cocktail Book night at Alembic, I thought I would make Savoy Milk Punch No. 1. Upon investigation, it turns out it is based on a recipe from the 1862 version of Jerry Thomas’ Bartenders Guide.

The recipe from Mr. Thomas is as follows.

California Milk Punch.
(For Bottling.)
Take the juice of four lemons.
The rind of two lemons.
½ pound of white sugar, dissolved in sufficient hot water.
1 pineapple, peeled, sliced and pounded.
6 cloves.
20 coriander seeds.
1 small stick of cinnamon.
1 pint of brandy.
1 pint of Jamaica rum.
1 gill of Batavia Arrack.
1 cup of strong green tea.
1 quart of boiling water.
1 quart of hot milk.

Put all the materials in a clean demijohn, the boiling water to be added last; cork this down to prevent evaporation, and allow the ingredients to steep for at least six hours; then add the hot milk and the juice of two more lemons; mix, and filter through a jelly-bag; and when the punch has passed bright, put it away in tight-corked bottles.

This punch is intended to be iced for drinking. If intended for present use filtering is not necessary.

California Milk Punch

Using Mr. Thomas recipe as a starting point:

Bernal Heights Milk Punch
1 qt Osocalis Brandy.
1 pt Appleton V/X.
1 pt Coruba.
1 pt Batavia Arrack von Osten.
Peel 4 lemons.
Juice 6 lemons, strained
1/2 pineapple, chopped and crushed.
6 cloves.
1 cinnamon stick (cassia).
5 Green Cardamom Pods, Crushed.
4 teaspoons Lung Ching Dragonwell Tea.
16 oz Water
1/2 # Florida Crystals.
1 quart Straus Family Creamery Whole Milk.

Peel lemons and add to Brandy.  Juice 4 lemons and crush pineapple.  Add to rums (including Arrack).  Allow both to infuse for 48 hours.

Heat water and add spices and tea. After it has steeped for 10 minutes, strain. Add sugar, stir to combine, and cool.

Juice other two lemons and add to pineapple, lemon, and rum mixture. Heat milk to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Add to Rum, lemon, and pineapple mixture. Allow to stand for 30 minutes and filter through cheesecloth. Strain brandy mixture off peels. Combine Rum mixture, brandy mixture, and syrup. Cool, bottle in clean containers, and chill over night. Filter again through coffee filters, leaving any sediment which has collected in the bottom of the containers behind.  Makes about 3 quarts.

Perhaps not so oddly, I misremembered the recipe and used Cardamom instead of Coriander. But I really like the clove/cardamom nexus, so not a bad thing.  I needed some pineapple and pineapple juice for another cocktail this week, so only used half for the punch.  More pineapple wouldn’t hurt.  The initial division of the infusions was just a result of the size of my containers, but actually seemed to help with getting a firmer curd from the milk solids.  If I had to do it again, I’d do it the same way.

The water amounts didn’t really make sense to me for starting with 80 proof booze. My guess is Thomas was working with cask strength liquors, to require that much dilution. So I adjusted a bit. Perhaps a bit too much, as according to Mrs. Flannestad, this ended up a bit strong and boozy.  Depending on your perspective, that may be bad or good.

Very good response to the punch at Alembic’s Savoy Cocktail Book night last Sunday, so if you’re feeling adventurous give it a try.  I don’t think you’ll regret it.  We just served it over ice with a splash of soda.  It would make a fantastic highball!

Even though I can now cross this off the list of Savoy punches I need to make, I have a feeling I’ll be making this Milk Punch again some time soon.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pansy Blossom Cocktail

Pansy Blossom Cocktail

Pansy Blossom Cocktail.

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 teaspoon Homemade Grenadine)
1 Glass Anis del Oso. (1 1/2 oz Kubler Absinthe)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Spanked mint tip garnish.)

As the Block and Fall Cocktail calls for “Anis del Oso or Absinthe”, I’m going to assume a blanche absinthe, like Kubler, is a fair substitution here.  Perhaps Anis del Oso is a dry style Anis. I added the mint tip, just to give the camera something to focus on, though it also brings a pleasant brightness to the scent of the cocktail.

Not much difference between the Pansy Cocktail and Pansy Blossom.  Slightly less Grenadine and Angostura in the Blossom, making it a bit less murky in color.

On the previous post someone pointed out the color wasn’t dissimilar to the dark center of the pansy flower.

Another possible reading of the name comes up on the pansy wikipedia entry:

“In William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the juice of a pansy blossom (“before, milk-white, now purple with love’s wound, and maidens call it love-in-idleness”) is a love potion: “the juice of it, on sleeping eyelids laid, will make a man or woman madly dote (fall in love) upon the next live creature that it sees.” (Act II, Scene I see also: Oberon at II, i).”

There’s a definite parallel there, between Absinthe’s alleged aphrodisiac properties and those ascribed to the pansy blossom.

Again, if you like Absinthe and are into high proof booze, this isn’t a horrible cocktail. I’ll take it over Jägermeister any day.  Still, there are better uses for these ingredients.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pansy Cocktail

Pansy Cocktail

Pansy Cocktail.

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
6 Dashes Grenadine. (2 barspoons homemade Grenadine)
1 Liqueur Glass Absinthe. (1 1/2 oz Kubler Absinthe)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Wow, is that not a menacing, muddy, brown-ish red color?

“Oh yeah, if you can’t drink this, you’re a pansy!” is about all I can think regarding the name, as there is a sort of disconnect between a shot of slightly sweetened and chilled Absinthe and the word, “Pansy”.

With a good, long, hard shake, this isn’t, strictly speaking, awful.  In the end, probably not all that dissimilar to a shot of Jägermeister.  Still, there are probably better ways to use all of the ingredients here, at least if quality cocktails is your goal, and not simply getting drunk.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Panama Cocktail

Panama Cocktail

Panama Cocktail.

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (3/4 oz Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Osocalis Brandy)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.  (How about: Lightly whip cream with a dash of sugar syrup until slightly thickened.  Stir brandy and Creme de Cacao together to chill and strain into a cocktail glass.  Layer thickened cream carefully onto drink.  Garnish with freshly grated nutmeg.)

OK, I’m cheating.  I can’t take the credit for this great idea.

One of the drinks we are serving at Heaven’s Dog is from Charles H. Baker, Jr. and called the “Tiger’s Milk II”.  This drink follows the pattern for most cream and spirits drinks and is of typically Baker-esque proportions.

Old brandy 1 1/2 jiggers, Bacardi Gold Seal the same; 1/2 cup each of thick cream and milk, then sweeten to taste.  Shake vigorously for at least 1/2 minute with big lumps of ice and serve in a goblet.  Dust with nutmeg, or ground mace, or cinnamon.

Uh, yeah, since Baker preferred 2 oz jiggers, that’s, um, 6 ounces of spirits and a cup of half and half. Wheee! That’s a party in a glass, all right.

Erik Adkins shrunk the spirits by about a third, then separated the cream agitation from the chilling of the cocktail. When I asked he how he’d thought of separating the cream out of the drink into a separate element, he said he’d seen a similar drink at Clover Club in Brooklyn, NY. In any case, the Tiger’s Milk II has proven to be a brisk seller at the restaurant, even if it is a bit of a pain to make.

So I am stealing from him and the Clover Club here for my version of the Panama.

Give it a try some time, and you’ll see this Alexander-like drink in a new light.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Savoy Cocktail Book Night, June 2009

One Sunday a month, Alembic Bar is foolish enough to toss out their regular menu and instead hand you a Savoy Cocktail  Book.  Pick a cocktail, any cocktail.  We dare you.

This Sunday, June 21st, is the day. After 6 PM is the time.

Here are some of the ingredients for a punch I am working on:

1 qt Osocalis Brandy
1 pt Appleton V/X
1 pt Coruba
1 pt Batavia Arrack
peel 4 lemons
juice 6 lemons
1/2 pineapple, chopped and crushed
6 cloves
1 cinnamon stick
5 Cardamom Pods, Crushed
4 teaspoons Lung Ching Dragonwell Tea
1/2 # Florida Crystals
1 quart Straus Family Creamery Whole Milk

C’mon, step right in, the water’s fine.

shark

“If you will dare, I will dare!”

Palmetto Cocktail

Palmetto Cocktail

Palmetto Cocktail.

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Martini & Rossi Sweet)
1/2 St. Croix Rum. (1 oz Cruzan Single Barrel)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Can’t believe I actually have an excuse to use Cruzan Single Barrel in a cocktail! We’ve had a few Rum and Italian Vermouth drinks before, but usually they call for Bacardi, which I take to mean a white Cuban style rum. And usually, with those white rums they aren’t very amazing, tasting more of Vermouth than Rum.

Here, on the other hand, is something quite enjoyable!

The rum has enough character to be complemented nicely by the Italian Vermouth and bitters. Yum.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Palmer Cocktail

Palmer Cocktail

Palmer Cocktail.

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Canadian Mist 1885 Special Reserve)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Even without sugar, there really shouldn’t be anything wrong with this. So little Angostura and lemon. But man, does this construction just seem to point up the weaknesses of this whisky. Just dreadful stuff. Totally constructed and artificial tasting. Bleah.

I’m going back to the non-traditional Alberta Springs, if this is the general state of Canadian Whisky.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.