Martinez Cocktail

Hayman's Old Tom

Called my local liquor store a while ago and asked them if they were going to carry the Hayman’s Old Tom Gin. Usually, they’re on top of this sort of thing, so I was a bit surprised when the response was, “Hayman’s? I haven’t heard of that.” Fortunately, a quick call to the distributor revealed that the gin was already in Southern California and would be shipped North soon.
Martinez Cocktail
(6 People)

Pour into the shaker 3 glasses of Gin, 3 of French Vermouth, add a dessertspoonful of Orange Bitters and 2 of Curacao or Maraschino. Shake and serve with a cherry and a piece of lemon rind.

I suspect Craddock gets the idiotic idea of using French Vermouth in a Martinez from Robert Vermeire, who espouses this formulation in his book, “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”. And I suppose it is perfectly fine drink, though Martinez, it is not.

Martinez Cocktail

Martinez Cocktail
(current Ellestad formulation)

1 1/2 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin
3/4 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth
Scant teaspoon Luxardo Maraschino
Dash Angostura Orange Bitters
Dash Angostura Bitters

Stir with ice to chill and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel over glass. Add a (preferably luxardo or toschi) cherry if you so desire.

If you’re using a higher proof gin, you might want to up the amount of vermouth, but I find with Plymouth, or now Hayman’s, 2-1 is a good ratio. I also like to add a dash of angostura, as I find it tames some of the tropical marshmallow candy notes that show up when Carpano Antica is in close proximity to Luxardo Maraschino. As they say, your mileage may vary.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Marny Cocktail

Marny Cocktail

Marny Cocktail

1/3 Grand Marnier. (3/4 oz Grand Marnier)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore No. 6)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Really pimping the North Shore, lately!

Sorry, I really dig their gin, even though it isn’t very widely available.

Anyway, obviously, this cocktail pre-dates the Hitchcock movie of the similar (“Marnie”) name by about 35 years. So no connection there.

Not exactly awful, neither is the Marny particularly compelling. That is, unless you like slightly sweet, cognac and orange flavored gin. A dash of bitters or a twist would likely go a long way towards improving it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Marmalade Cocktail

Marmalade Cocktail

Marmalade Cocktail
(6 People)

By its bitter-sweet taste this cocktail is especially suited to be a luncheon aperitif.

Place the following mixture in the shaker:

2 Dessertspoonsful Orange Marmalade. (1 tsp. D’Arbo Bitter Orange Marmalade)
The Juice of 1 big or 2 small Lemons. (Juice 1/2 small lemon)
4 Glasses Gin. (2 oz Death’s Door Gin)
(Dash Simple)

Shake carefully and pour out, squeezing a piece of orange rind into each glass.
As usual re-doing the recipe for 1.

The lemons I found last week were a bit on the green side. When I tasted it before shaking, it wasn’t quite there. Definitely needed a little extra simple to bring it into line.

An enjoyable cocktail! A bit of a pain to double strain, due to the marmalade.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Marguerite Cocktail

Marguerite Cocktail

Marguerite Cocktail

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore No. 11)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cock-tail glass. Twist orange peel on top.

Having recently been to a number of cocktail seminars presented by Bols and The Bitter Truth, I can tell you that this is the earliest known recipe known for a Dry Gin, Orange Bitters, and French Vermouth Cocktail.  In other words, perhaps the real precursor to the modern Dry Martini!

Stephan Berg has tracked this recipe’s first know publication down to an 1896 book called, “Stuart’s Fancy Drinks and how to mix them”.

The original recipe from that book, courtesy of Stephan Berg:

Marguerite Cocktail

1 dash orange bitters.
2/3 Plymouth Gin.
1/3 French Vermouth.

North Shore makes 2 gins. The No. 11 is supposedly their more traditional Juniper forward dry gin. It is quite tasty, but it seems a bit floral still to be called a truly traditional Dry Gin.

Still, it makes a very nice Martini, errr…, Marguerite.

PS. I just love these valencia oranges from the Farmers’ Market. They literally drip oil when you pull the twist. Just awesome. Tasty too!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

New Pages

I’ve made a couple changes to the blog.

I’m moved what was getting to be a ridiculously long Blogroll onto its own page:

Blogroll

I was trying to auto-generate this from my Google Reader, which seems to be broken at the moment. Hopefully the genius engineers at Google will fix this soon, but I’m not sure if I’m thrilled with the result anyway.  I’ve started changing it back to a regular old web page. Lots of links to add, though…

I’ve also added a page of what I guess I’d call my current “haunts”.  Often people ask for recommendations when they are visiting San Francisco.  I figured it would be easier to just write them down on a web page.  Not really meant to be reviews or anything.  It’s more just the places I’ve gone recently and enjoyed enough to recommend.

Haunts

Both are still works in progress. Well, as is everything else on the blog!

Margato Cocktail (Special)

Margato Special

Margato Cocktail (Special)

1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Montecristo White Rum)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1 Dash Kirsch. (1/3 tsp. Trimbach Kirsch)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
The Juice of 1/3 Lime.
A little sugar (scant teaspoon caster sugar) dissolved in soda-water.

Shake well and serve in cocktail glass.

Uh right. If this recipe makes sense to anyone, feel free to let me know. Who measures “The Juice of 1/3 Lime”?

It’s pretty OK. Tasting mostly like a slightly vermouth-ey glass of tart lemonade. Certainly, the alcohol is well disguised. Maybe that is the point?

There is a Cuban rum cocktail with dry vermouth and lime. Not El Presidente, I can’t think of what it is called. I suppose this is sort of a “perfect” version of that cocktail.

Oh right, to answer my own question, it is the “Presidente Vincent” cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Manyann Cocktail

Manyann Cocktail

Manyann Cocktail

The Juice of 1 Lemon.
2 Dashes Curacao. (generous 1 tsp. Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
1/2 Gin. (1 oz Boodles Gin)
1/2 Caperitif. (1 oz St. Raphael Aperitif Gold)

Shake well and strain into port wine glass.

In the interest of my own edification, and in the absence of Caperitif, I picked up a bottle of St. Raphael Gold, having read it was some sort of Quinquina.

Uh, hmmm….

Well, the St. Raphael Gold is interesting.

To me it tastes more like a moderately sweet, pale sherry than a Quinquina. Odd, I’ve never before tried an Aperitif Wine that reminded me this much of a Sherry.

I’m also not sure what to make of the recipe. It’s about the only one in the Savoy that combines lemon with Caperitif, so it makes me suspect that it isn’t the Caperitif providing sweetness. That it was at least a somewhat dry aperitif.

To be honest, the Manyann might be pretty refreshing with a bit more curacao, ice, and some seltzer.

As written above, I can’t say I found it rated much more than a “drinkable”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Manhattan Cocktail (Dry)

Manhattan Cocktail Dry

Manhattan Cocktail (Dry)

1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/2 Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)
(dash angostura bitters)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

I saved the Sazerac Rye for last, as it is one of my favorite Manhattan Whiskies.

Oddly, I didn’t care for it. The drier blend of vermouths really accented the musty character of the whiskey.

When examining various Manhattan recipes, the instructions from this Manhattan recipe from the Mud Puddle Books reprint of the 1900 edition of Harry Johnson’s Bartender’s Manual stuck out:

Manhattan Cocktail
(Use a large bar glass.)
Fill the glass up with ice;
1 or 2 dashes of gum syrup, very carefully;
1 or 2 dashes of bitters (orange bitters);
1 dash of curacao or absinthe, if required;
1/2 wine-glass of whiskey;
1/2 wine-glass of vermouth;

Stir up well; strain into a fancy cocktail glass; squeeze a piece of lemon peel on top, and serve; leave it for the customer to decide, whether to use absinthe or not.  This drink is very popular at the present day.  It is the bartender’s duty to ask the customer, whether he desires his drink dry or sweet.

I just love how nearly every ingredient is optional.  The final instruction, “It is the bartender’s duty to ask the customer, whether he desires his drink dry or sweet,” remains good advice to this day.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Manhattan Cocktail (Sweet)

Manhattan Sweet

Manhattan Cocktail (Sweet)

1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
1/2 Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Michter’s, U.S. #1 Straight Rye)
(dash Angostura Bitters)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. (Luxardo Cherry.)

Couldn’t leave out the bitters, sorry.

This Manhattan was also really tasty, I must say.

Well integrated and harmonious flavors.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Manhattan Cocktail (No. 2)

Manhattan Cocktail No. 2

MANHATTAN COCKTAIL. (No. 2.)

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Pikesville Rye Whiskey. Sorry Canadians.)
1/3 Ballor Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)

Shake (I stirred) well, strain into cocktail glass, with cherry. (Uh, oops. And damn I have some really good cherries!).

(Named after the island on which New York City Stands.)

Anyway, this, to me, is pretty much the quintessential Manhattan.

2/3 Rye Whiskey, 1/3 Italian Vermouth, with a dash of bitters. If I had to pick one cocktail that I was gonna be stuck with for the rest of my life, this would be it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.