Charlie Lindbergh Cocktail

Charlie Lindbergh

Charlie Lindbergh Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Juice. (2/3 tsp Orange Juice)
2 Dashes Pricota. (2/3 tsp Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot liqueur)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir?) well and serve in cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I can only assume this is named after Charles Lindbergh, the aviator who flew the first successful non-stop flight between New York and Paris in May of 1927.

The cocktail itself seemed a bit, uh, “girly”. Nice enough, and all, but more of the sort of drink you’d buy for that cute girl you are trying to impress, than the sort of thing you’d have as a brace up after crossing the Atlantic.

If you want to play along and don’t have Cocchi Americano, I’d again suggest 1 oz dry vermouth, dash angosutura, dash maraschino liqueur, and an orange twist squeezed into the tin. It’s pretty close and might even be better in this particular case.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lily Cocktail

Lily Cocktail
Lily Cocktail

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (ok, a little much, at one teaspoon)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Aperitivo Americano)
1/3 Crème de Noyau. (3/4 oz Luxardo Amaretto di Saschira)

Shake (stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I still have a dream that I will one day run across Noyau de Poissy, but until then I’m using the Luxardo Amaretto where Crème de Noyau is called for.

I’ve heard some rumors on the Cocchi Americano front, but nothing concrete yet. I’ve got my fingers crossed!

The Lily is on the sweet side, but I’m surprised to admit I found it a fascinating beverage. The Americano and the Amaretto are a really interesting flavor combination.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Liberty Cocktail

Liberty Cocktail

Liberty Cocktail

1 Dash Syrup. (1/3 tsp. Depaz Cane Syrup)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Montecristo White Rum)
2/3 Apple Jack. (1 1/2 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Rosemary Sprig Garnish.)

OK, Montecristo isn’t really a Cuban style white rum. So sue me. If I ever find the El Dorado White, I’ll use that instead. Until then, it’s the Montecristo.

I guess this is really a sling. Spirits and sugar. Pretty nice, as these sorts of things go.

The rosemary was pure embellishment on my part. I like rosemary and apples. I had some rosemary out for dinner. Needed something for the camera to focus on. Actually it turned out to be a decent scent accent for the cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

“L.G.” Cocktail

L.G. Cocktail

“L.G.” Cocktail

1 glass Scotch Whisky. (2 oz Highland Park 12)
1 glass Beer as a chaser. (St. Ambroise Pale Ale, Brasserie McAuslan, Montreal, Quebec, Canada)

My beer club notes describe the St. Ambroise Pale as follows:

The St-Ambroise Pale Ale pours into the glass with a crystal clear copper/amber color. The head is offwhite to beige in color, fairly light and frothy, and leaves a faint lace in the glass as it subsides. The nose shows crisp malt and toasted grains, with a strong citrus/hop note, and even a touch of grassiness. It is medium- to full-bodied on the palate, with pronounced nuttiness, toast, and hints of fruit. The hops are almost entirely missing from the middle of the palate, before returning in the finish with a pleasant bitter note, but very little citrus character.

Not exactly a cocktail, but a very enjoyable beer and a very enjoyable Scotch.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lemon Pie Cocktail

Lemon Pie Cocktail

Lemon Pie Cocktail

1 Glass Scotch Whisky. (2 oz Famous Grouse Scotch)
1 bottle Lemonade. (Fever Tree Bitter Lemon)

(Patrick Gavin Duffy: Stir gently with 1 ice cube.)

No instructions for this one, so initially I wasn’t sure if they were to be served separately or mixed together. Fortunately, Patrick Gavin Duffy included the above instructions in his “Official Mixer’s Manual”.

In the English vernacular, I’m told “Lemonade” refers to a carbonated beverage not dissimilar to 7-Up. Or perhaps those carbonated French Lemon Sodas.

In any case, I’ve wanted to try the Fever Tree Bitter Lemon for a while now, and this seemed like a fine excuse. As an experiment, I’d say it was a bit of a failure, as Scotch and Bitter Lemon didn’t quite work for me. The Scotch already has enough character going in and the bitterness kind of clashed with it. Would have preferred plain lemon soda or, to be perfectly honest, plain soda water.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 2)

Leave It To Me No 2

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 2)

1 Teaspoonful Raspberry Syrup. (1 teaspoon Monin Raspberry Syrup)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
3/4 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Now, we’re talking.

This is a lovely cocktail, which definitely could use some revivification.

Admittedly a bit girly, being slightly pink and a bit fruity. Still it’s not pink enough to cause alarm and with enough of a gin punch that I think any male secure in his manhood should have no problem with it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 1)

Leave It To Me No 1

Leave It To Me Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1/3 tsp. Lemon Juice)
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/4 French Vermouth (1/2 oz Dolin French Vermouth)
1 Dash Grenadine. (1/3 tsp. Fee’s American Beauty)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, the cocktail is a lovely light rose in hue.

And the flavor is somewhat reminiscent of childhood flavors. Unfortunately, I’d say the flavors it reminds me of are some sort of slightly medicinal eccentric English candy.

I dunno, maybe if you’re Heston Blumenthal, and nostalgia food is your thing, this might be just the ticket. Doesn’t, however, do much for me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Leap Year Cocktail

Leap Year Cocktail

Leap Year Cocktail

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (OK, it was close to a teaspoon)
2/3 Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/6 Grand Marnier (1/2 of 3/4 oz Grand Marnier)
1/6 Italian vermouth. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Carpano Antica)

Shake (stir, I thought) well and serve in cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

This Cocktail was created by Harry Craddock, for the Leap Year celebrations at the Savoy Hotel, London, on February 29th, 1928. It is said to have been responsible for more proposals than any other cocktail that has ever been mixed.

First, I’m not quite sure this picture adequately conveys the loveliness of the color of this cocktail.

Second, wacky, I can’t quite explain the flavor. Initially, it was the vanilla/caramel of the Antica which dominated. But as I settled in to enjoying it, it became stranger and kind of chocolate-ish. Definitely drier than I expected, but still pretty sweet at the same time. Cool.

I know there’s been a lot of revision of this cocktail and cocktails like it.

Just want to encourage anyone to give it a try as written first, then work on variations. I dunno, maybe it doesn’t need improvement.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Underhill Punsch, Jan 2009

Underhill Punsch

Amazingly, I’ve been making versions of this recipe for over 2 years now!

Latest version, this one distinguished by presence of actual Sorrento Lemons!

Underhill Punsch, January 2009

2 cups Appleton V/X Rum
1 cup Batavia Arrack
2 cup hot extra strong spiced tea (4 tsp Peet’s Yunnan Fancy Tea, 6 crushed cardamom pods, brewed in 2 cup water)
2 cup raw or natural sugar
2 Sorrento lemons sliced thinly, seeds removed

Put sliced lemons in a resealable non-reactive container large enough to hold 4 cups of liquid. Pour Rum and Batavia Arrack over citrus. Cover and steep for 6 hours.

Dissolve sugar in hot tea and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate.

After 6 hours, pour rum off of sliced citrus, without squeezing fruit.

Combine tea syrup and flavored rum. Filter and bottle in a clean sealable container. Rest 24 hours and enjoy where Swedish Punch is called for.

Say a Boomerang, Biffy or even a Diki-Diki, if you are feeling brave.

Anyone got any other favorite uses for Swedish Punsch?

Leap Frog Cocktail

Leap Frog Cocktail

Leap-Frog Cocktail

1 Lump of Ice. (few lumps fridge ice)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1 Glass Gin. (2 oz No. 209 Gin)
1 Split of Ginger Ale. (Reed’s Extra Ginger Brew)

Serve in long tumbler.

I was hoping to garnish this with some delicious smelling Holy Basil I got from a couple weeks ago, but it didn’t make it. So I stuck in a couple Tarragon sprigs I had in the fridge. The tarragon added nearly nothing to the cocktail aside from visual interest.

It’s really hard to argue with this combo, especially on a hot day. Even if the rest of California is on fire.

If I were to quibble, I’d say, this is my first time trying Reed’s “Extra Ginger Brew” and I was hoping for it to be a bit zestier. I dunno, maybe I’ve burned out all my taste buds, but I didn’t find it particularly pungent.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.