Luigi Cocktail

Luigi Cocktail

Luigi Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 tsp. Fee’s American Beauty Grenadine)
1 Dash Cointreau. (1/3 tsp. Cointreau)
The Juice of 1/2 Tangerine. (Scant juice 1/2 small orange)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

According to Robert Vermeire, in his book “Cocktails: How to Mix Them”:

This cocktail was invented by Mr. Luigi Naintre, the proprietor of the Embassy Club, who became famous at Romano’s, Ciro’s, and the Criterion.  He is one of the best known restauranteurs in the world and has an enormous and faithful following wherever he goes.  This cocktail is one of the most popular in London.

Unfortunately, it is just the wrong season for Tangerines or Mandarins. None to be found anywhere ’round these parts. I suppose they might be in season somewhere in the Southern Hemisphere?

Anyway, this certainly is a red cocktail when made with the Fee’s Grenadine. Almost worryingly pink.

I can see how it would be better with Tangerine or Mandarin juice, as is almost any cocktail you care to name, not to mention homemade grenadine, but still… It’s a fine, refreshing cocktail, just not fantastic, at least to me.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Los Angeles Cocktail

Los Angeles Cocktail

The Los Angeles Cocktail
(4 People)

The Juice of 1 Lemon. (Juice a generous quarter of a Lemon)
4 Hookers Whisky. (2 oz Eagle Rare Bourbon)
4 Teaspoonsful Sugar. (1 teaspoon sugar)
1 Egg. (About a quarter of a whisked large egg)
1 Dash Italian Vermouth. (a splash of Carpano Antica)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Drops of Angostura to garnish.)

I will note that this recipe is nearly verbatim from Judge Jr.’s “Here’s How” except that Judge Jr. calls for “Scotch” instead of just “Whisky”. He also adds the comment, “After trying this you will understand why they talk about the climate out there.” Whatever that means.

I wasn’t feeling much like Scotch and the bottle of Eagle Rare Bourbon was handy.

I also took the liberty of borrowing the Angostura drop garnish from the Pisco Punch, which adds a nice spicy scent to the cocktail. And, well, plus bitters, so you can actually call it a cocktail!

I really enjoyed this cocktail. It’s too bad so many people are skittish about whole eggs in cocktails, as this cocktail is a great pick me up. As Harry McElhone sez about the Swissess in “Barflies and Cocktails”, “This is a very good bracer for that feeling of the morning after the night before.”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lord Suffolk Cocktail

Lord Suffolk

Lord Suffolk Cocktail

1/8 Italian Vermouth. (1/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/8 Cointreau. (1/4 oz Cointreau)
5/8 Gin. (1 1/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/8 Maraschino. (1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon peel.)

Whichever Lord of Suffolk this cocktail refers to, he certainly had a sweet tooth!

It’s actually a pretty tasty cocktail with the funk of the Maraschino out front, just really, really sweet.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lone Tree Cocktail

Lone Tree Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters.
1/3 Italian Vermouth.
1/3 French Vermouth.
1/3 Dry Gin.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

So, apparently, the authors of the Savoy Cocktail book came into a bit of hot water for publishing this version of the Lone Tree.

In the second edition of the Savoy, they included the following at the back of the book:

Lone Tree Cocktail
1/4 Italian Vermouth.
3/4 Gin.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

A friend of mine wrote to me recently from Paris, giving the Savoy Cocktail Book a little well merited praise.

He objected, however, to the formula for the “LONE TREE COCKTAIL” on page 97 of this book, and explained his objection by giving the history of the origin of this cocktail. The following is the gist of this history.

“Round about the year 1900 a prominent member of a well-known club a few miles from Astor, Massachusetts, propounded to his fellow-members the startling theory that it was possible to concoct a cocktail without the addition of bitters. Hitherto bitters had always been considered to be an essential ingredient of all cocktails.  With some diffidence the members of the club decided on the principle that a brave man will try anything once, to give the theory a chance.  The result was an immediate success and the launching of a bitterless cocktail upon an astonished world. It was called after its inventor’s property, Lone Tree Farms and consisting simply of 3 parts Gin to one part of Italian vermouth, shaken very thoroughly in ice so that the melted ice formed about one quarter of the finished potion. No French Vermouth was used ; indeed, at that date, French vermouth was practically unknown in America.”

The original theory of the bitterless cocktail was that bitters were bad for the human system but, like so many other theories, it appears to have no facts to support it, and the question of the beneficial or contrary effect of bitters in a cocktail is still one with which some of the greatest scientists of the day are constantly investigating without arriving at any satisfactory answer.

Anyway, while looking through various cocktail books, I found a version of the Lone Tree in a recently acquired version of Jacques Straub’s “Drinks” from 1914.

His version of the Lone Tree is about the same as above, 2/3 Gin & 1/3 Italian Vermouth, except that it calls for Tom Gin.

So…

Lone Tree Cocktail

Lone Tree Cocktail

1 1/2 oz Tanqueray Malacca Gin. (Thanks again Mike and Jenny!)
3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth.
dash Depaz Cane Syrup.

Stir well and strain into a cocktail glass. Lemon Peel

A tasty and bittersless cocktail, who’d a thought? Welcome to the future!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

London Buck Cocktail

London Buck

London Buck Cocktail

1 Lump of Ice.
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz No. 209 Gin)
The Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1 Split of Ginger Ale. (Fever Tree)

Use long tumbler.

As far as I can tell, the term “buck” refers to a drink made with spirits, Lemon, and, generally, ginger ale.

The London Buck is not a mind blowing beverage, but it is perfectly tasty and refreshing.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

London Cocktail

London Cocktail

London Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 dash Fee’s, 1 dash Regan’s Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Syrup. (1/3 tsp. Depaz Cane Syrup)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/3 tsp. Absinthe Verte de Fougerolles)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4… Oh ok, really, it was 1 ounce Junipero Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I did look in a couple other vintage recipe books for this one, and every one gives the amount of Gin as the same 1/3. To be fair, 3/4 oz isn’t an unusual amount of spirits for a Savoy Cocktail. It’s just that 3/4 oz of spirits is usually is accompanied by vermouth or some other mixer. I mean this really is just about the Savoy Fourth Degree without the vermouths.

I got out my tiniest glass and did my best to respect the recipe.

Tasty, anyway. Cold Absinthey, orangey, slightly sweetened gin. Thank you, I think I’ll have another!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Little Princess Cocktail

Little Princess

Little Princess Cocktail

1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Carpano Antica)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Montecristo White Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Similar to the Fair and Warmer or Fluffy Ruffles this is a Rum Manhattan. Or really, Rum Lone Tree. But we’ll get to the details of that in a couple cocktails.

This desperately needs something. A rum with more character, bitters, or a twist.

As it is, it tastes like slightly juiced up Carpano Antica. Not a bad thing, but not exactly a cocktail either.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Little Devil Cocktail

Little Devil

Little Devil Cocktail

1/6 Lemon Juice. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/6 Cointreau. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Montecristo White Rum)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz North Shore No. 6)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In Harry McElhone’s “Barflies and Cocktails” he sez this recipe comes “from Fitz, Ciro’s Bar, London, my late apt pupil.”

A bit similar to the Blue Devil or Bacardi Special, it’s not bad. Dry and mostly ginny. The Montecristo White seems to act mostly as an extender to the gin. I have to admit lately, at Cointreau kind of sweetness levels, I do kind of prefer giving a slight advantage to the liqueur lately rather than the lemon. Something like 3/4 oz of Cointreau and 1/2 oz of Lemon would be about right at my sweet spot at this point in my life for this cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Lindstead Cocktail

Linstead

Linstead Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Sazerac Straight Rye)
3 Glasses Sweetened Pineapple Juice. (1 1/2 oz Knudsen Pineapple Juice)
Finish off before shaking with a dash of Absinthe Bitters. (dash Gin and Wormwood)

Shake and serve, squeezing a little lemon peel on top of each glass.

Since finding a recipe for “Wormwood Bitters” in Eddie Clarke’s “Shaking in the Sixties”, I have gone so far as to purchase two wormwood plants, grow them in my community garden plot, and infuse a small amount of gin with a few sprigs from the plants. The resulting substance is indeed very bitter, but not entirely unpleasant.

I didn’t have a lot of hope that the Linstead Cocktail would be all that tasty. I mean, Whiskey, Pineapple, and bitters, how could that even be good? But, somehow it actually is. Oddly found myself savoring and puzzling over the flavors in the cocktail. Far more interesting than those three ingredients have any real right to be.

If you don’t have your own wormwood plants or don’t want to go to the trouble of infusing gin, you could probably substitute “Gorki List” if you’ve got it around.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sea Fizz

seafizz

Sea Fizz

1 1/2 oz Absinthe
Juice 1/2 lemon
1 egg white
1 tsp caster sugar (or 1 tsp 2-1 simple syrup)

Shake ingredients for 10 seconds in a cocktail shaker without ice. Add large ice and shake well. Strain into glass and top up with soda water.

There are few drinks with a lot of Absinthe that I truly like.  This is one of them.

The Sea Fizz is not in the “Savoy Cocktail Book,” but appears without the egg white in later editions of Patrick Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” as the “Seapea Fizz”.

Apparently, it was created by Frank Meier, at the time of the Gambon bar and later of the Ritz in Paris, for Cole Porter (C.P., thus “Seapea”) some time around 1933.

If you use Pernod, Ricard, or another sweetened anise liqueur, reduce, or eliminate, the sugar.

Basically an Absinthe sour, this is a delicious and dangerously refreshing beverage.