Kingston Cocktail

Kingston Cocktail

Kingston Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Jamaica Rum. (1 1/2 oz Appleton V/X)
1 1/2 Glasses Kummel. (3/4 oz Gilka Kaiser Kummel)
1 1/2 Glasses Orange Juice. (3/4 oz fresh Orange Juice)
1 Dash Pimento Dram. (Very Little St. Elizabeth’s Allspice Dram)

Shake carefully and serve whilst, frothing.

The unique taste of this cocktail is due to Kummel mixed with a liqueur known as Pimento Dram (a Jamaican Liqueur) without which it would lose all its direction.

I had feared this might be rather over sweet. But it isn’t really. Perhaps due to some nicely tart Valencia Oranges. I liked it quite a bit, but then I am fond of caraway flavors. I was enjoying it so much, I gave a taste to Mrs. Flannestad, who got a very puzzled look on her face. So perhaps it isn’t a crowd pleaser.

Gilka Kummel

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

King Cole Cocktail

King Cole Garnish

King Cole Cocktail

1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Bonded Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey)
2 Dashes Syrup. (1/2 teaspoon Depaz Cane Syrup)
1 Dash Fernet Branca.
1 Lump of Ice.

Stir well and decorate with slices of orange and pineapple.

Oh happy day, I get to make an Old-Fashioned!

And not only that, but one with fruit and Fernet. Oh how very California! Or is that how very New York?

I took the opportunity to, “decorate with berries, in season,” as Harry Johnson or Jerry Thomas would say.

King Cole Cocktail

Mmmm… Booze soaked fruit! I dare you to call that “garbage”.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Kina Cocktail

Kina Cocktail

Kina Cocktail

1/4 Kina Lillet. (1/2 oz Cocchi Americano)
1/2 Dry Gin (1 oz Beefeater Gin)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

To compare and contrast, per discussion in the eGullet Lillet Topic, I also tried making this thusly:

1/2 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino
2 Dash Angostura
Orange Peel
1/2 oz Dolin Vermouth
1 oz Beefeater Gin
1/2 oz Carpano Antica

It should be no surprise to anyone that I really liked both of these cocktails.

On the surface they are quite similar in level of bitterness and overall character. I squeezed a long strip of orange peel into the tin and then dropped it in, stirring the drink with it. Nicely imitated the orange character of the Cocchi.

The Cocchi seems to be using a richer and sweeter wine base, which might be imitated with the simple addition of a dash of gum syrup.

While the spices of the bittering agents are close, the contrasting characters of the warm quinine bitterness of the Cocchi Americano and the sharp gentian bitterness of the Angostura is more of a problem.

A friend  suggested perhaps Fee’s Aromatic Bitters might be a more appropriate bittering agent. Which of the other various bitters currently available has the most quinine character?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Kicker Cocktail

Kicker Cocktail

Kicker Cocktail

2 Dashes Italian Vermouth (1 teaspoon Carpano Antica)
1/3 Calvados. (3/4 oz Calvados Reserve Roger Groult)
2/3 Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Add a Cherry.)

Again, something from the 1920s for the fans of the Super Extra Dry Cocktail.

I get cocktails like this from time to time when I order Manhattans, and I have to admit I just kind of wonder what the bartender is thinking (or not.) This combination of decent rum, a very good young Calvados, and Carpano Antica certainly beats the heck out of a luke warm Maker’s with a dash of stale M&R. All the same, it doesn’t beat it by much.

I’d rather just sip a glass of the Calvados.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Sunday! Sunday! Sunday!

The first Savoy Cocktail Book night of 2009 will be taking place this Sunday, January 25th, at Alembic Bar in the Upper Haight neighborhood of San Francisco.

On these nights, Alembic puts away its regular menu and (mostly) only makes drinks from Harry Craddock’s classic, “Savoy Cocktail Book”.

Stop bye any time after 4 PM, or so, and treat yourself to a Liberty or some other similarly celebratory themed cocktail.  Or just ask for a delicious Magnolia beer and chat with us as we attempt to hone our page turning and alphabetical skills.

Hope to see you there!

As always, for up-to-date information on events at Alembic, check out their blog: Alembic Bar

K.C.B Cocktail

KCB Cocktail

K.C.B. Cocktail

1 Dash Apricot Brandy. (1/3 tsp. Rothman & Winter Orchard vs. Haus Alpenz Blumme Marillen)
1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1/3 tsp. Lemon Juice)
1/4 Kirsch. (1/2 oz Trimbach Kirsch)
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 6)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Patrick Gavin Duffy suggests you, “Stir well in ice and strain. Twist of Lemon Peel.” I tried it both ways, and to be honest, I’m not sure the stirring matters that much, (I know I should have double strained,) but I do suggest you follow his advice for the lemon peel.

Among the possibly meanings of “K.C.B.” is that of the Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath.

Oddly, it does appear, to mean literally “bath” as in bathing.

The second highest order of chivalry in England. The title of the Order is late medieval in origin, it arose from the ritual washing (inspired by the ritual of baptism), a symbol of spiritual purification, followed by a night of prayer and meditation before the Knights of the Bath attended the mass and then receive there accolade. Medieval knights frequently carried out there vigil of fasting, prayer and purification in the Chapel Royal of St John the Evangelist in the Tower of London. There is an account of this ceremony in the reign of King Henry IV which remained until the time of King Charles II.

More information on wikipedia: Order of the Bath

Pretty serious stuff!

Ahem, well, it’s too bad for Humuhumu we didn’t make it to this drink in Portland, as there is no trace of vermouth!

I tried it with both Apricot Liqueur and Apricot Eau-de-Vie. There’s so little volume, that the liqueur had very little impact in the cocktail. The Eau-de-Vie seemed to contribute more. If you’ve got it around, I’d suggest it.

Though, I don’t know who to suggest making this cocktail for. Maybe lovers of Super Extra Dry Gin Martinis looking for a little spice in their cocktail life?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Daniel Shoemaker–Part Three

This is the Seventh in an ongoing series of bartender features on the Underhill-Lounge. Previously, I had experimented by asking the bartender at Montgomery Place to make me a Bombay Cocktail No. 2, but this just seemed to result in a grumpy bartender. To make it less of a shock, I thought I would contact some local bartenders and give them a choice of the dozen or so Savoy Cocktails that might be coming up in the book. Surprisingly, some actually were game.

danielreads*

Continuing The Savoy “J” Stomp with Daniel Shoemaker at Teardrop Lounge in Portland, OR.

The participants:

Daniel Shoemaker: Bartender Extraordinaire at Teardrop Lounge in Portland, OR.
erik_flannestad: Your itinerant Savoy Stomper.
Humuhumu: Tiki goddess and web developer.
Trott: Talented musician, friend and co-worker. It was Trott whose quixotic quest to make all the recipes from the “Joy of Cooking” originally inspired me to take on the Savoy Cocktail Book.
Tradertiki: Portland, OR blogger, Tiki enthusiast, proprietor of his home bar Reynolés Galley, and guide for the monthly “Tiki Tuesdays” at the Teardrop Lounge.

Also along for the ride were Mrs. Flannestad, who chose not to write up her thoughts and Trott’s friend Ken. Siobhan and her husband Ben stopped by a bit later.

J.O.S. Cocktail

J.O.S. Cocktail

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Regan’s Orange)
1 Dash Lemon Juice or Lime Juice. (Lemon Juice)
1 Dash Brandy. (Christian Brothers)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well (well, stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Daniel stepped out for a moment, leaving us in the capable hands of Alyson for this and the next couple cocktails. This was perfectly fine, I suppose. A more assertive gin than the Plymouth might have saved this from being condemned as flat.

Humuhumu: I’m tired of vermouth. Tastes pretty flat.
Trott: J.O.S.=?? What could J.O.S. stand for? And who is Kaiser Solzheyn?
TraderTiki: A bit flat, flavor down low, watery.

Well, I’m pretty sure that J.O.S. doesn’t mean “Java Operating System,” but really have no other likely candidates. “Journal of Official Statistics”? There is a city in Nigerial called “Jos”, but that’s not an acronym.

Journalist

Journalist Cocktail

2 Dashes Lemon Juice.
2 Dashes Curacao. (Bols Orange Curacao)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/6 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/6 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
2/3 Gordon’s Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

It’s always nice to come across a classic you have thus far avoided. I hadn’t tried the Journalist before and quite enjoyed it. Interesting to see the response among the group that a slight adjustment of proportions makes, as this is otherwise pretty identical to the J.O.S. Daniel mentioned that this was one of the classic cocktail specials that they’d run through lately, to good response. I can see why.

Humuhumu: Nice and Balanced.
Trott: Excellent ass-end. (Great Finish!)
TraderTiki: Balanced, spice at the finish.

Judge Jr.

The Judge Jr. Cocktail

1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Matusalem Platino)
1/3 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp. Cane Sugar)
1 Dash of Grenadine. (House made Raspberry Syrup)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In his 1927 book, “Here’s How,” Judge Jr. says about this cocktail, “This drink, I discovered later, was invented by someone else, but it’s good just the same!” I’m not sure which drink he’s referring to, but it is pretty similar to the Bacardi Special. Kind of funny that a guy would name such a pink drink after himself! I found it refreshing.

Humuhumu: Smells like watermelon, (the real stuff,) tastes too tart, without other flavors coming through->imbalanced.
Trott: I like that a lot, but I’m totally wasted.
TraderTiki: Too tart, grenadine not balancing.

Judgette Cocktail

The Judgette Cocktail

1/3 Peach Brandy. (3/4 oz Briottet Creme de Peche de Vigne)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1 Dash of Lime.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I actually found this one fairly pleasant. Definitely dessert-esque, Humu really pegs it as similar to a dessert wine. It is a cocktail I could see enjoying after dinner. Maybe with a dash of bitters?

Humuhumu: Too sweet, tastes like dessert wine.
Trott: Sweet. Dry peach brandy would be… Oh gosh, I’ve had a lot to drink.
TraderTiki: Muscat like sweetness. Very sweet, but not cloying.

Stir Action

About this time, I hear Humu exclaim something like, “Nooooo! Not more vermouth! I’m vermoooooothed out!” There may have been some sobbing.

And I thought the “J” cocktails were safe.

I guess this is what happens when you involve civilians.

Of course, to be fair, if we were in Humu’s milieu and drinking 20 Tiki cocktails in a row, about this time I would be exclaiming, “No! Not more Pineapple Juice! I can’t take any more Pineapple Juice!”

It does make me wonder how warped my palate has become from drinking all these vermouth heavy cocktails. If you ask me to taste a cocktail, and I say, “Well, it could use a little more vermouth,” now you know why.

Jupiter Cocktail

Jupiter Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Orange Juice
1 Teaspoonful Parfait Amour Liqueur. (Brizard Parfait Amour)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Stir well in ice and strain. Twist of Lemon Peel.

I’ve been putting off the Jupiter for some time now, as folks usually descripe it as difficult to make. But Daniel really pulls it off. Just the hint of the Parfait Amour flavor is very subtle and enjoyable. The sort of cocktail I really enjoy. Where even after all these cocktails, there is something curious in the flavors that makes you want to take another sip and figure out.

Humuhumu: Simple–I think I have vermouth burnout, though.
Trott: See above.
TraderTiki: Calm orange flavor.

The Cast*

Obviously, it would have been wise to stop at about this point, but, well, few people have ever accused me of being a wise man. We also tried a couple Teardrop cocktails and some things that Daniel was working on. Then we settled up our bill and wandered off in search of dinner and, hopefully, to sober up a bit before the concert we were attending later in the evening.

First, let me say how great it was that Daniel and the other bartenders at the Teardrop were willing to play along with this little game. I’ve sort of wanted to do something like this myself, in celebration of 2 years of Savoy Stomping, but how much more fantastic to have Portland Monthly’s 2008 Bartenders of the Year mix the drinks instead? Not to mention wash the dishes!

To be honest, when I was going over the drinks in preparation for the trip, and then looking at Teardrop’s menu online, I was thinking to myself, “What the hell am I thinking? Why are we just not going to Teardrop to enjoy their drinks?” But then, who knows, maybe no one would have tried the John Wood cocktail for another 30 years. I certainly expect this may have been the first time anyone has made it in the last 30 years!

Speaking from my side of the bar, I know everyone had a great time and came away with a real respect with what they are accomplishing there at the Teardrop Cocktail Lounge. Just about everyone in the group was already making plans to return the next time they were in Portland.

I count myself lucky to have met these talented men and women and truly look forward to tasting what interesting things they are up to the next time I see them. I promise, there will be no Savoy Cocktails involved!

*These pictures by Mrs. Flannestad.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Daniel Shoemaker–Part Two

This is the Seventh in an ongoing series of bartender features on the Underhill-Lounge. Previously, I had experimented by asking the bartender at Montgomery Place to make me a Bombay Cocktail No. 2, but this just seemed to result in a grumpy bartender. To make it less of a shock, I thought I would contact some local bartenders and give them a choice of the dozen or so Savoy Cocktails that might be coming up in the book. Surprisingly, some actually were game.

Humu Grins*

Continuing The Savoy “J” Stomp with Daniel Shoemaker at Teardrop Lounge in Portland, OR.

The participants:

Daniel Shoemaker: Bartender Extraordinaire at Teardrop Lounge in Portland, OR.
erik_flannestad: Your itinerant Savoy Stomper.
Humuhumu: Tiki goddess and web developer.
Trott: Talented musician, friend and co-worker. It was Trott whose quixotic quest to make all the recipes from the “Joy of Cooking” originally inspired me to take on the Savoy Cocktail Book.
Tradertiki: Portland, OR blogger, Tiki enthusiast, proprietor of his home bar Reynolés Galley, and guide for the monthly “Tiki Tuesdays” at the Teardrop Lounge.

Also along for the ride were Mrs. Flannestad, who chose not to write up her thoughts and Trott’s friend Ken. Siobhan and her husband Ben stopped by a bit later.

Jeyplak Cocktail

Jeyplak Cocktail
1 Dash Absinthe. (St. George Absinthe Verte)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
Shake well (well, stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.
This is very similar to one of my favorite Savoy Cocktails (so far), the Fourth Degree. The big difference, being, in the Savoy Cocktail Book, the Fourth Degree is equal parts Gin, Sweet Vermouth, and Dry Vermouth. This is 2/3 Gin, 1/3 Sweet Vermouth. Interestingly, however, some people use this recipe for the Fourth Degree. In his book, “Imbibe!” David Wondrich uses the Fourth Degree recipe from the Waldorf Astoria Bar Book which is exactly this recipe.
I’ve no idea where the name comes from. All first 8 pages of Jeyplak googles end up at drink databases.
Humuhumu: Tastes way too much like NyQuil.
Trott: Absinthe Martini.
TraderTiki: Unusual, alcohol sweetness, absinthe pastis flavors are calmed.

Jimmy Blanc Cocktail

Jimmy Blanc Cocktail
3 Dashes Dubonnet. (Dubonet Rouge)
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Kina Lillet Approximation)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.
We were playing with a bottle of Noilly Prat which Daniel had infused with Orange and Cinnamon and then we were adding pinches of quinine trying to get something like Cocchi Americano. I think we got pretty close to modern Lillet Blanc, but it didn’t quite get to where Cocchi Americano lives. It’s an interesting challenge. Thinking back on it, it seems like the tinctures must be alcohol based. Orange, spice, quinine, mixed with the wine, and then aged.
Humuhumu: Balanced, but kind of not special. Meh.
Trott: Hmmm… Nah.
TraderTiki: Tastes like perfume.

Joburg Cocktail

Joburg Cocktail
4 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange)
1/2 Glass Caperitif. (1 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/2 Glass Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Matusalem Platino)
Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I had to twist Daniel’s arm to get him to make this one with Lillet Blanc. He wanted to skip it as we didn’t have any solid knowledge about the flavor profile of Caperitif. It’s really a pretty decent light cocktail, even with Lillet Blanc. With a bit more full flavored white rum, this would probably be very good.
In regards the name, the Caperitif sort of gives it away. Joburg is the slang name for Johannesburg, as in South Africa.

Humuhumu: I like it! It tastes a bit like the oil-cured herbs de provence olives I get some times.
Trott: I knew a guy in High School named Joe Berg.
TraderTiki: Orange oil, lightly perfumey.

Jockey Club Cocktail

Jockey Club Cocktail
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters. 2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp. Amaretto)
4 Dashes Lemon Juice.
3/4 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Daniel had called around trying to locate Crème de Noyau for this with no luck. I’ve tried to convince friends who travel to France to bring back some without any luck. I think I’m going to have to give up and just make it myself. It’s stone fruit season. Surely there must be a bunch of stone fruit pits laying around to play with.

Humuhumu: Smells like soap. Tastes very good, though…
Trott: Puzzling.
TraderTiki: Strong Citrus, sharp citrus on front taste.

Johnnie Mack Cocktail

Johnnie Mack Cocktail

3 Dashes Absinthe. (St. George Absinthe Verte)
1/3 Orange Curacao (3/4 oz Bols Orange Curacao)
2/3 Sloe Gin. (1 1/2 oz Lindisfarne Sloe Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sigh, I’ve been waiting and waiting for the Plymouth Sloe Gin to show up in San Francisco. The launch party was months ago. And every week I call the liquor store which is hoping to carry it, they say, “soon,” or “It will be in next week.” And stupidly, every “next week” or “soon” I stop in the store and there is no Plymouth Sloe Gin. Well, at least I have my half bottle of Lindisfarne Sloe Gin which I personally imported in my suitcase.

Anyway, even with the interesting tannic tartness of sloe gin, this is too sweet. “Dessert anyone?” was Daniel’s comment. I also don’t quite get the combination of Absinthe and Sloe Gin.

Humuhumu: Grape Juicey, too sweet.
Trott: John Adams looks like George Washington, sort of.
TraderTiki: Tart and tangy with great, berry depth.

John Wood Cocktail

John Wood Cocktail

2 Parts Irish whisky. (Jameson’s Irish Whiskey)
4 Parts Italian Vermouth (Carpano Antica Vermouth)
2 Parts Lemon Juice.
1 Part Kummel. (Gilka Kummel)
1 Dash Angostura bitters.

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I really liked this one. As Daniel put it, “Sometimes when you’re making cocktails, you come across one you just want to sit across from and puzzle over.” A really interesting Manhattan variation. Apparently, however, not a crowd pleaser!

Humuhumu: Unpleasantly sweet.
Trott: Vermouth waits.. Then Pounces!
TraderTiki: Flavor develops into a sweet bitter orange.

Thus endeth part the second of our adventure at Teardrop Lounge.
Things Are Piling Up*

*These pictures by Mrs. Flannestad.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Mixology Monday: The Dog

mxmologo

This month’s Mixology Monday is hosted by The Scribe on his blog A Mixed Dram.  The theme is, “New Horizons“.

His summary of the theme:

Hello everyone, and welcome to A Mixed Dram. I’m hosting this month, and I think you will enjoy our topic this month. I know that we tend to do what is familiar to us, and I am no less a victim of this than anyone else, often even more. My first several cocktails were basically sours, and then my next several were little more than old fashioneds. Well, today I issue you a challenge: Try something new!

Yeah, I think I’ve got something happening that fits that bill…

Believe it or not, I will soon be drawing a paycheck, for the first time since 1995, from a restaurant.

I’m still a bit in shock about this, maybe even denial.

You may recall that Erik Adkins had mentioned the possibility of “staging” a shift or two at Slanted Door.

Turned out, because of the wonders of modern HR, that that would be more challenging than he initially thought.  He would basically have had to put me on the payroll for the couple nights I worked, filling out all the fun paperwork required for any real employee.

But while he was mentioning that, he said something like, “Too bad the timing isn’t right for the new space in the SOMA Grand.  That would probably work better for you than either Flora or Slanted Door.”

I may sometimes seem a bit scattered and forgetful.  The Absent Minded Professor of modern American cocktails.  But when I am interested and care about something, I don’t forget.  Nor do I give up.

So whenever Erik mentioned the new restaurant, I would get in a little dig about finding a space for enthusiastic and hard working ex-line cooks.  Especially those with nearly encyclopedic knowledge of spirits and early Twentieth Century cocktails.  After a month or so, I wore him down to a tentative, “Well, we’ve got all the bar shifts covered at open, but maybe after a month or two.  We’ll see.”  I thought that was pretty good!

Mrs. Flannestad and I headed to Arizona for the Christmas holiday.  Family stuff.  Oddly Phoenix was rainy and a bit cold.  I love my family, but I have to say, after 5 days of non-stop closeness and honesty, I start to remember why I moved out in the first place.

December 27th, we’re sitting in the bedroom, napping after an exhausting day of eating and sleeping, when my cell phone rings.  “Erik Adkins” is calling?  I am so flabbergasted and nervous that I accidentally hang up on the call trying to answer.

Call him back and he tells me that, if I want, he’s got a shift a week at Heaven’s Dog.

I tell him I’m definitely interested, but need to talk it over with Mrs. Flannestad.  I will call him back the next day.

Mrs. Flannestad is unhappy that she will lose quality time, but also encouraging.  Telling me that if I want to do this, I should.  I may never get another opportunity quite like this.

Sunday morning, waiting for our plane at Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, I call Erik to tell him, if he wants a middle aged bartender, he’s got one.

His response, “Middle aged bartenders are totally in style these days.”

But it’s funny, so much of all of this goes back to a single afternoon in the early fall of 2007.  I was sitting at Alembic Bar chatting with David Wondrich who had agreed to take time out of his busy schedule to meet for a drink.  First David was incredibly encouraging of the “Savoy Stomp”, telling me, “The Stomp must go on!”  Well, if David Wondrich tells you something you’re doing is worthwhile, I’ll warn you, you’ve got your work cut out for you for the next few years.  Second, David encouraged me to introduce myself to then Alembic bartender Josey Packard.  Josey would agree to participate in a Savoy bartender feature, cementing the continuation of my favorite part of the Stomp, not to mention being an encouraging friend and like-minded spirit.  Third, after a gentleman down the bar introduced himself to David, I also met Erik Adkins for the first time.

So instead of my usual scapegoat for drink related mishaps, Jeffrey Morgenthaler, perhaps I should be blaming David Wondrich for all this wonderful mess!

Or maybe I should just get over blaming others and start taking responsibility for the consequences of my actions.  Just seems so “adult”…

Daniel Shoemaker–Part One

This is the Seventh in an ongoing series of bartender features on the Underhill-Lounge.

Previously, I had experimented by asking the bartender at Montgomery Place to make me a Bombay Cocktail No. 2, but this just seemed to result in a grumpy bartender.

To make it less of a shock, I thought I would contact some local bartenders and give them a choice of the dozen or so Savoy Cocktails that might be coming up in the book.

Surprisingly, some actually were game.

Teardrop Sign*
About a year ago Daniel Shoemaker and Ted Charak opened the Teardrop Cocktail Lounge. I visited Portland last fall and had a great time hanging out, geeking out about cocktails, and tasting the numerous bitters and elixirs they were making in house. I mean check out this fantastic Bitters and Tinctures holder they had custom made for the bar:

Bitters & Tinctures

Anyway, we’ve kept in touch after meeting at the bar. Turned out Daniel was a good friend of someone I knew in San Francisco. And as time passed I became acquainted with some other folks in the Portland bar and cocktail scene through various acquaintances.

A month ago some friends and Mrs. Flannestad hatched a plan to road trip up to Portland and catch a concert.

As usual, I started to plot ways that I could squeeze drinks at quality cocktail bars into the very short, long weekend in Portland.

I sent Daniel a note asking if he’d be interested in making some Savoy Cocktails while I was in Portland.

He agreed and I sent him the list of the next few cocktail recipes.

While I was thinking about that, it occurred to me that I would have at least three people with me who might be interested in at least trying some cocktails. I usually don’t involve civilians in these sorts of affairs, but the “J” cocktails seemed pretty harmless. So I floated the idea of doing all of the “J” cocktails to Daniel. I would bring forms for my friends to write down their notes on the cocktails and it would be a bit of a party.

He also agreed to that, amazingly.

So I started to do a bit of calling around of Portland friends to see if they would be willing to come out and help, or at least stop by and say, “Hi”.

The participants:

erik_flannestad: Your itinerant Savoy Stomper.
Humuhumu: Tiki goddess and web developer.
Trott: Talented musician, friend and co-worker. It was Trott whose quixotic quest to make all the recipes from the “Joy of Cooking” originally inspired me to take on the Savoy Cocktail Book.
Tradertiki: Portland, OR blogger, Tiki enthusiast, proprietor of his home bar Reynolés Galley, and guide for the monthly “Tiki Tuesdays” at the Teardrop Lounge.

Also along for the ride were Mrs. Flannestad, who chose not to write up her thoughts and Trott’s friend Ken. Siobhan and her husband Ben stopped by a bit later.

Daniel Shoemaker*

Daniel Shoemaker’s BIO:

Tended bar in San Francisco for 13 years, running the bar at ThirstyBear Brewing Co. for almost 10 of those.  Re-located to Portland, OR to open up Teardrop Cocktail Lounge, as a town that truly appreciates the hands-on, homemade & farm-to-table approach to food and drink.  In the intervening 1 1/2 years it took us to open our doors, threw myself into the research & archaeology that led us to create such a wide array of bitters, tonic & homemade elixirs.

Jack Kearns

Jack Kearns Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Syrup.
1/4 Bacardi Rum.
3/4 Dry Gin.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Jack Kearns Cocktail (No. 2)

1/4 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz Matusalem Platino)
1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Syrup. (House “Gum” Syrup based on maltodextrin)
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Kind of one of those where you stare at them for a while and wonder if you have gone crazy. Nope, they’re exactly the same. I did find one recipe for the Jack Kearns, in Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual,” which uses more syrup (3 more dashes) for the No. 1 than the No. 2.

From his wikipedia article, “Jack “Doc” Kearns (August 17, 1882 – June 17, 1963) was an American boxing manager from the state of Washington. He is most famous for managing Jack Dempsey, who was World Heavyweight Champion from 1919 to 1926. He also managed Mickey Walker, Joey Maxim, and Archie Moore. He was given the nickname “Doc” from Dempsey.”

I guess if you were dealing with a boxing manager who could handle the Manassa Mauler, you’d probably give them what they want. “Feeling a bit sweet today, Jack?”

Humuhumu: “Taste is very fruity, but still dry.”
Trott: “Refreshing, awesome, dry, but fruity.”
Tradertiki: “Subtle floral notes. Drier rum may crisp it up.”

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Jack Pine Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange.
1 Slice Pineapple.
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

As in the Holland House we have a stray piece of pineapple.

Is it a garnish? Or does it go in the cocktail?

Daniel initially interpreted this as a garnish, so we tried that.

As cocktails go, not that interesting. A dry vermouth version of the Bronx.

However, having recently run across a 1930s era recipe for the “Hugo Special”, which calls for you to, “Place slices of orange and pineapple in a mixing glass muddle well,” I asked Daniel to give that a try. Daniel’s comment was, “that’s a completely different cocktail.” Others in the group were not that impressed, but I kind of liked it. Might have to revisit the Holland House and try it with muddled pineapple.

Humuhumu: “Pre-muddle version-> Thin. Post-muddle version-> Better, but sort of blah.”
Trott: “Best light tiki drink ever.”
Tradertiki: “Slightly flat. Better with muddled pineapple.”

Jack Rose

Jack Rose Cocktail

The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime.
1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz Teardrop Lounge Housemade Raspberry Syrup)
3/4 Applejack or Calvados. (1 1/2 oz Boulard Calvados)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The bar at Teardrop had just finished off the last of their house grenadine a few months before, so instead we’re using raspberry syrup for the Jack Rose. For the first try we went with Lemon, Raspberry, and Calvados. When this wasn’t met with unanimous approval, as a proper jack rose should be, we went for a second try with lime, raspberry, and Laird’s AppleJack. Met with nearly unanimous aproval, with Mrs. eje proclaiming it to be her favorite cocktail of the evening.

Humuhumu: “Dry, apple comes through strong->too sweet? With AppleJack and lime ->balanced and yum!”
Tradertiki: “Apply and fruity. Could use some understatement. AppleJack and lime creates a subtler, less cloying sweetness.”

Jackson Cocktail

Jackson Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange)
1/2 Orange Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin, Drops House Orange Tincture)
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 oz Dubonnet Rouge)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

My second try of the Angostura Orange Bitters and I am still liking them a lot. Strong bitter note, intense orange taste, a bit of spice (I was picking up a strong coriander flavor and maybe chamomille).

Cocktail is nothing special to write home about.

Humuhumu: “Tastes like tea. Specifically, some orange tea from Pike Place Market. Not all that good.”
Trott: “Way, way, orangey. Hmmm…”
TraderTiki: “Dry Burgundy Orange.”

Jack Withers

Jack Withers Cocktail

The Juice of 1/2 Orange.
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, as a Bronx is exactly the same with half as much orange juice, there’s not much too surprising here. A light and rather vermouthy cocktail. Daniel insisted on re-making it again with Punt e Mes instead of Carpano, which certainly improves things.

No real clues as to who Jack Withers may have been. Another boxer?

Humuhumu: “First version tastes like licking someone’s grandmother who has just put on a bunch of perfume.”
Trott: “Vermouth-a-rama. Hmmm…”
TraderTiki: “Sweetness on the end, lots of citrus and melon notes. Version 2: More bitterness, punchier flavor.”

Jewel Cocktail

Jewel Cocktail
(6 People)

2 Glasses Green Chartreuse. (3/4 oz Green Chartreuse)
2 Glasses Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
2 Glasses Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 Dessertspoonful Orange Bitters. (Healthy dashes Angostura Orange)

Shake thoroughly and serve with a cherry, squeezing lemon peel on top.

A medium-dry fast-working cocktail.

A Bijou Cocktail by any other name. One of a few “Savoy Cocktail Book” examples where the “party size” version of the cocktail goes by a different name. Others have noted that “Bijou” is the French word for “Jewel”. Daniel also insisted we try a version of the Bijou he’d been making lately with Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey. Oh boy was that tasty!

Humuhumu: “Very full bodied->Strong flavor, sweet. Could stand to be cut with some water, maybe should be served with an ice cube.”
Trott: “Muscular, bad-ass, Hell’s Angel of Jaeger-like cocktails.”
TraderTiki: “A Bijou in disguise, Chartreuse brought out, then centered with the vermouth.”

Thus endeth part the first of our adventure at Teardrop Lounge.

Silhouette*

*These pictures by Mrs. Flannestad.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.