Imbiber’s 100

Darcy O’Neil, over at the Art of Drink blog, has proposed that Imbibers adapt the “Omnivore’s 100” meme and posted the following “Imbiber’s One Hundred“.

Instructions:

1) Copy this list into your blog, with instructions.
2) Bold all the drinks you’ve imbibed.
3) Cross out any items that you won’t touch
4) Post a comment here and link to your results.

OR

If you don’t have a blog, just count the ones you’ve tried and post the number in the comments section of his blog.

Here’s mine…

List of Drinks You Must Try Before You Expire

1. Manhattan Cocktail
2. Kopi Luwak (Weasle Coffee) (Extemely expensive coffee.  Beans eaten by weasels, partially digested, and pooped out before being roasted and ground for coffee.  Hmmm…  Tempted to strike that one out.)
3. French / Swiss Absinthe
4. Rootbeer
5. Gin Martini
6. Sauternes
7. Whole Milk
8. Tequila (100% Agave)
9. XO Cognac
10. Espresso
11. Spring Water (directly from the spring)
12. Gin & Tonic
13. Mead
14. Westvleteren 12 (Yellow Cap) Trappist Ale (I wish!)
15. Chateau d’Yquem
16. Budweiser (Budvar, even!)
17. Maraschino Liqueur
18. Mojito
19. Orgeat
20. Grand Marnier
21. Mai Tai (original)
22. Ice Wine (Canadian) (Plus Canadian ice cider!)
23. Red Bull
24. Fresh Squeezed Orange Juice
25. Bubble Tea (Just haven’t gotten around to it yet…)
26. Tokaj
27. Chicory
28. Islay Scotch
29. Pusser’s Navy Rum
30. Fernet Branca
31. Fresh Pressed Apple Cider
32. Bourbon
33. Australian Shiraz
34. Buckley’s Cough Syrup (Darcy has clarified, this is some sort of vile Canadian Cough Syrup.  Does Robitussin count?)
35. Orange Bitters
36. Margarita (classic recipe)
37. Molasses & Milk
38. Chimay Blue
39. Wine of Pines (Darcy sez this is some sort of fermented beverage made from Pineapples.  I had house made Tepache at Teardrop Lounge in Portland.)
40. Green Tea
41. Daiginjo Sake
42. Chai Tea
43. Vodka (chilled, straight)
44. Coca-Cola
45. Zombie (Beachcomber recipe)
46. Barley Wine
47. Brewed Choclate (Xocolatl)
48. Pisco Sour
49. Lemonade
50. Speyside Single Malt
51. Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee
52. Champagne (Vintage)
53. Rosé (French)
54. Bellini
55. Caipirinha
56. White Zinfandel (Blush)
57. Coconut Water (I totally think this shouldn’t count unless you’ve had it directly from the coconut on a tropical island.)
58. Cerveza
59. Cafe au Lait
60. Ice Tea
61. Pedro Ximenez Sherry
62. Vintage Port
63. Hot Chocolate
64. German Riesling
65. Pina Colada
66. El Dorado 15 Year Rum
67. Chartreuse
68. Greek Wine
69. Negroni
70. Jägermeister
71. Chicha
72. Guiness
73. Rhum Agricole
74. Palm Wine
75. Soju
76. Ceylon Tea (High Grown)
77. Belgian Lambic
78. Mongolian Airag
79. Doogh, Lassi or Ayran
80. Sugarcane Juice (I’ve chewed fresh sugar cane, so I’m gonna give this one to myself.)
81. Ramos Gin Fizz
82. Singapore Sling
83. Mint Julep
84. Old Fashioned
85. Perique
86. Jenever (Holland Gin)
87. Chocolate Milkshake
88. Traditional Italian Barolo
89. Pulque
90. Natural Sparkling Water
91. Cuban Rum
92. Asti Spumante
93. Irish Whiskey
94. Château Margaux (My French wine phase was quite a while ago so I’m not sure about this one.  But I don’t think I ever quite got to that price range.)
95. Two Buck Chuck
96. Screech (I’ve had Wray & Nephew Overproof, does that count?)
97. Akvavit
98. Rye Whisky
99. German Weissbier
100. Daiquiri (classic)

91 out of 100.  Obviously, I’ve been beverage obsessed for some time now.

Now if I can just get to Mongolia, Belgium, Canada, and Mexico, I’ll knock out the rest…

Gradeal Special Cocktail

Gradeal (Special) Cocktail

1/4 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz Northshore Gin #6)
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (1/2 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Havana Club Anejo Blanco)

Shake (I’d stir) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Tasty and sophisticated? Another drink that goes against the usual stereotypes of rum drinks.

Most of the google references I find to “Gradeal” are to this drink. Interestingly, though, according to this article from an Australian paper, Rising to the Occasion, “Gradeal” was the name given to the stones Scots cooked their oatcakes on.

In Roman times in the north of Scotland, she says, the native Gaels baked cakes of oats on stones set round the open fire. These stones were called gradeal and from this was derived the Scottish word girdle. The more modern girdle was a thin round plate of cast iron with a semicircular handle, and was first invented and manufactured in Culross in Fife, Scotland.

Especially interesting, in that the Gradeal Cocktail is pretty similar to the “Culross Cocktail“.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Grace’s Delight Cocktail

Grace’s Delight Cocktail
(6 People)
Fill a large glass with broken ice and place in it 2 glasses of Whisky, 2 ½ glasses of French Vermouth and half a glass of Raspberry Brandy. Add the juice of half an Orange, a teaspoonful of Orange-flower water, 3 Juniper berries, a bit of Cinnamon and a little Nutmeg.
Stir well with a big silver spoon, pour the mixture, straining it, into a cocktail shaker holding about a pint. Shake and keep for an hour on ice. Serve.

Grace’s Delight Cocktail, revised

1 oz Rittenhouse Bonded Rye
1 1/4 ounce Dolin Dry Vermouth
1/4 ounce Chambord
Juice 1/8 Orange
Dash Orange Flower Water
2 Juniper Berries
Pinch Cinnamon
Pinch freshly ground Nutmeg

Crush Juniper berries in the bottom of a mixing glass or tin. Add Cinnamon, Nutmeg, and Rye. Let stand for at least an hour. Add remaining ingredients, shake and strain into a cocktail glass.

I have to admit I’ve been looking forward to Grace’s Delight since I first read through the Savoy Cocktail Book a few years ago. However, the instructions never really made much sense to me. I’ve done my best to render them into a semblance of order. Sorry Grace, I don’t have a big silver spoon, and, I guess, technically, Chambord is a black raspberry liqueur, not red raspberry.

In any case, the result of the above procedure is actually quite tasty. Albeit in a sort of odd, fruity, spicy way. More like a mini punch than a cocktail. I’d certainly drink it again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Golden Slipper Cocktail

Golden Slipper Cocktail

1/2 Liqueur Glass Yellow Chartreuse. (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1/2 Liqueur Glass Eau de Vie de Danzig. (1 oz Danzig Goldwasser)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I guess an interesting point, if yer a cocktail geek, about the Golden Slipper, is that Robert Vermeire places it in with his Pousse Cafe drinks. But, but by the 1930s, both Craddock and Duffy are saying it is a shaken drink.

Being an old-school kind of guy, I figured pousse cafe. Plus, if you’re shaking the thing, it sort of negates the point of using the gold wasser.

Golden Slipper Cocktail, Old School

1/2 Liqueur Glass Yellow Chartreuse. (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse)
The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1/2 Liqueur Glass Eau de Vie de Danzig. (1 oz Danzig Goldwasser)

Pour Yellow Chartreuse into a sherry glass. Gently drop in whole egg yolk. Pouring over the back of a spoon, slowly add Danzig Goldwasser, so the two liquids do not mix.

It doesn’t seem like there is a huge visual difference between yellow Chartreuse and Danzig Goldwasser, but the flavors are fairly distinct. The Gold Wasser is not as sweet with more of a gin-like edge than the chartreuse.

On the “golden slipper” front, “The Golden Slipper” appears to be a folk tale of Asian origin. The best, and spookiest, google I found, was this vietnamese version:

A Cinderella Tale from Vietnam

Wow, it’s got ghosts, skeletons, murder, cruelty, etc. Anyway, yeah, that’s Cinderella, all right. Amazing the whitewashed stuff we Anglos get stuck with.

Also, “Golden Slipper” was the name of a charity formed by a group of Jewish Masons in 1922.

Golden Slipper Club

Perhaps they enjoyed the odd cocktail?

Update regarding Goldwasser, I received a question, “but is the dantzig sweet? i thought it was just russian eau de vie that had gold flake in it…”

Everything I’ve read suggests that Eau-de-Vie de Danzig and Goldwasser are synonymous. The one I used, “Der Lachs Original Danziger Goldwasser,” is an 80 proof herbal/spice liqueur. It didn’t seem quite as sweet as Yellow Chartreuse, but I didn’t try them side by side, just together in the drink.

Nice article here:

Gdansk Goldwasser: Alchemic Elixir

Goldwasser liqueur (literally ‘gold water’ in German), has been a popular Gdansk tradition since 1598. And though other brands and distilleries have tried to copy it, Goldwasser continues to be inextricably linked to Gdansk. A strong (40%) root and herbal liqueur, Goldwasser’s famous feature is the small flecks of 22 karat gold flake that float in the beverage. Though the posh prestige of the alcohol has historically made it a favorite drink of such darlings as Russia’s Catherine the Great, the rather diminutive gold flakes suspended in Goldwasser fail to make its price inordinate or its health effects negligible.

Hope that helps!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Golden Gate Cocktail

The Golden Gate Cocktail

3/4 Orange Ice. (2 scoops Ciao Bella Blood Orange Sorbet)
1/4 Gin. (1 oz No. 209 Gin)

Place in shaker and shake ~~ no ice.

Talk about drinking your dessert or adult candy!

Totally the proto slushy margarita here!

Perhaps because my sorbet was a bit cold, it was tough to get the pieces of sorbet to break up just by shaking. Probably get better results by buzzing this with a stick blender or malt mixer.

As a San Franciscan, I have to say I’m a bit disappointed that this kiddy cocktail seems to be named after our most impressive bridge. Still, with a decent sorbet, it’s a tasty and non-painful way to get your “Vitamin G”, as Herb Caen would put it.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Golden Ermine Cocktail

Golden Ermine Cocktail

1/8 Italian Vermouth. (1/4 ounce M&R Sweet Vermouth)
3/8 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Beefeater’s Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

A perfectly pleasant cocktail. Doesn’t quite reach the heights of the Fourth Degree for me, but an interesting Martini variation all the same. Nice color.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gloom Chaser Cocktail

Gloom Chaser Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz Homemade Grenadine)
1/4 Grand Marnier. (1/2 oz Grand Marnier)
1/4 Curacao. (1/2 oz Senior Curacao of Curacao)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Really puzzling. Two kinds of orange liqueur and grenadine? Even more puzzling if you consider Grand Marnier to actually be a type of Curacao liqueur.

Unforuntately, I can find no indication that this recipe is incorrect. I kind of hoped that would be the case. Maybe someone swapped Curacao for Cognac or something.

But no, this ridiculously sweet recipe appears to be correct.

And, yeah, this is ridiculously sweet. The flavors aren’t bad but it turned out to be one of those few Savoy cocktails I couldn’t finish. Just too sweet. Makes my teeth hurt just thinking about it again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Glad Eye Cocktail

Note: The Savoy nights at Alembic have been on hiatus recently. There have been some rumors of their return. I will post when I know more.

Glad Eye Cocktail

1/3 Peppermint. (3/4 oz DeKuyper White)
2/3 Absinthe. (1 1/2 oz Lucid Absinthe)
(Dash Fee’s Mint Bitters)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I really was not looking forward to this cocktail. In fact I’ve been putting it off for nearly a week.

However, in some bizarre fit of masochism a local bar, Alembic, has decided to have a monthly event where instead of having a menu, they hand out copies of “The Savoy Cocktail Book” and tell patrons to pick a cocktail, any cocktail.

The first time they did this event I was out of town. Strangely, it was “successful,” in some measure of the term, so they have decided to make it a monthly event.

Stopped by this evening, and told the talented bartenders, yes, I would like a “Glad Eye” thank you. Their response was, you know, I really don’t think that is going to be very good. Well, so it goes. Indeed, it was not very good. Though less bad than I had feared.

Daniel, the bar manager, suggested perhaps putting it in a tube for alcoholic tooth brushers. But, he said, it would have to be a Tom’s of Maine type flavor, not some commercial brand. I suspect it was the aromatics of the Absinthe moving him in that direction.

One of the other bartenders thought she perhaps preferred it to the Stinger. The Glad Eye certainly carries a bit more of a sting than the stinger!

So there you go.

Should you desire an authentic cocktail made from the recipes in the Savoy Cocktail Book, drop by Alembic Bar the 3rd Tuesday of any month. They’ll do their best!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gin and Cape Cocktail

Gin and Cape Cocktail

1/2 Caperitif. (generous 1 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/2 Dry Gin. (generous 1 oz No. 209 Gin)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon (oops! used orange instead.) peel on top.

Again, no real idea what Caperitif may have been like, so substituting Lillet Blanc, as Cocktaildb.com suggests.

A perfectly enjoyable cocktail. A dash or two of bitters would probably perk it up quite a bit.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gin Cocktail

Gin Cocktail

4 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 tsp. Amaro CioCiara, dash Regan’s Orange)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Mystery Gin, 1/2 oz Beefeater’s Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Orange twist.)

I figured with 4 whole dashes of orange bitters here, it might be fun to use the Amer Picon-like CioCiara instead of regular orange bitters.

I found a small mystery bottle of something in my cabinet. Smells like gin. In fact, I suspect it might very well have been a sample of Hayman’s Old-Tom.

In any case, it seemed like it would be interesting in this cocktail, even though it is probably not a “Dry Gin,” and I didn’t have enough to make a whole 2 ounces.

Another cocktail needing a good long stir…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.