Five Fifteen Cocktail

Five-Fifteen Cocktail

1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Luxardo Orange Triplum)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Sweet Cream. (3/4 oz Cream)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I knew I’d made something like this before: Bud’s Special Cocktail. This is nominally closer to the idea of a Creamsickle in drink form than the Bud’s Special had been and a bit more pleasant. Still, not really the sort of drink I can finish.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fine and Dandy Cocktail


Fine and Dandy Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz fresh lemon juice)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Plymouth Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, it is a “Fine and Dandy” cocktail. It doesn’t quite match the special magic of either the Pegu Club or the Sidecar. Still, all in all, quite enjoyable.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

BOTW–Southern Hemisphere Harvest

I’m always interested in fresh hop ales, so was interested to see Sierra Nevada’s Southern Hemisphere Harvest Ale on the shelf at our last trip.  Not that I am particularly timely.  This came out in April or so of this year.  It is, however, currently fresh hop season for hops harvested in the US.  A bar in Hayward that I haven’t visited yet, The Bistro, had their Fresh Hop festival a couple weeks ago.  Sorry to have missed it.  Another local bar, Toronado, is having their Fresh Hop Festival on October 15th.  Unfortunately, it looks like I might miss this too, as Mrs. Flannestad and I have tickets to see Herman Dune that night at Bimbo’s.   In any case, we covered Sierra Nevada’s regular Harvest Ale last October.  This is their second version, with most of the hops coming from New Zealand.  They have a third, recently available Fresh Hop Beer using hops grown on their property in Chico:  Chico Estate Harvest Ale.  If I can track that down, it may be next week’s beer of the week.

Southern Hemisphere Harvest is another beer from Sierra Nevada which I find myself enjoying quite a bit.  Nice citrus hoppiness and good complexity.  Not overly heavy or sweet, it is well balanced.

For dinner we had Alaskan Halibut braised with aromatic vegetables, herbs, and Pineau de Charentes. Quinoa Pilaf. Spicy Braised Red Russian Kale. Baby Greens with Bariani Vinaigrette, dry farmed Two Dogs Sungold Tomatoes, and French Sheep’s Milk Feta.

Filmograph Cocktail

Filmograph Cocktail

1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac)
1/4 Kola Tonic. (1/2 oz Rose’s Kola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/2 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)

Shake, (well, stir, I suppose,) and strain into cocktail glass.

I know I promised to make my own Sirop-de-Citron the next time one of the cocktails called for it. And it is even lemon season. Sadly I have failed. And sadly failed this drink. At least with the Monin Lemon Syrup, this is the equivalent of some sort of very sweet hard candy with the Kola Tonic giving it a lovely medicinal edge. Cough Drop in liquid form. It’s hard for me to see this as anything other than a waste of a delicious Brandy.

Earlier in the day, a friend had called. Asking if I happened to have any Armagnac. It isn’t odd for him to ask me for a couple ounces of drink ingredients, as I know he is currently making drinks as part of his personal obsessive-compulsive project to make all the recipes from the “Joy of Cooking”. But, I did think it a bit odd to ask about Armagnac. I mean, there really aren’t that many cocktails that specify Armagnac. Why would they include one with the dozen or so cocktails in the Joy of Cooking? Turns out it is a Sidecar variation which they are inexplicably calling an “Armored Car,” (every google I do for “Armored Car” and “cocktail” turns up tequila and amaretto.)

My friend came over, and I made him an Armagnac Sidecar (2-1-1) with the Cerbois, Cointreau, and fresh lemon juice. Damn, if it wasn’t the best Sidecar I’ve ever made. I’ve actually always thought it a bit of a waste to use a too nice Brandy in Sidecars, as it often gets plowed over by the Cointreau and Lemon. The Armagnac really puts up a fight!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fifty-Fifty Cocktail

Fifty-Fifty Cocktail

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Dolin French Vermouth)
(A dash of Regan’s and a dash of Fee’s Orange Bitters)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with Olive.)

Yep, that’s tasty all right.

Sometimes there are few things better than a nice cold Tanqueray or Junipero Martini. Still really enjoying the Dolin in these vermouth heavy Martini-like cocktails.

The serendipity of going from the Fernet Cocktail to the Fifth Avenue to the Fifty-Fifty is pretty amusing. Nice to have a bit of variety in your cocktails.

What’s the story with the “Fitty-Fitty”? Was it the addition of Orange bitters that made them decide to give it an updated name? It is much better with the bitters…

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fifth Avenue Cocktail

Fifth Avenue Cocktail

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/3 Sweet Cream.

Use liqueur glass and pour carefully, so that ingredients do not mix.

This was actually pretty yummy, as these sorts of things go. But, then, I enjoy drinking the R&W Orchard Apricot straight. So, no problem there. Heck, I’d probably have it with my toast in the morning, or on my pancakes, if I didn’t have a pesky job to go to.

I got the Mozart Black Chocolate liqueur a while ago and have failed in my imagination to find uses for it. This was really pretty good. Certainly beats the heck out of Bols Creme de Cacao. I’m just glad that the specific gravities worked out between the two liqueurs.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fernet Branca Cocktail

Fernet Branca Cocktail

1/4 Fernet Branca. (Generous 1/2 oz Fernet)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (Generous 1/2 oz Martini & Rossi)
1/2 Dry Gin. (Generous 1 oz Death’s Door Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

One of the best “morning-after” cocktails ever invented. Fernet-Branca, an Italian vegetable extract, is a marvelous headache cure. (No advt.)

The next time I have such a bad hangover that I feel like I’m standing on Death’s Door, I’ll have to give this a try. Unfortunately, tonight, I didn’t start with a head or stomach ache, so can’t vouch for any particular therapeutic effect. I guess I hope the Fernet Branca Cocktaill is good for me in some manner, as it isn’t all that attractive looking.  And, well, it pretty much just tastes like Fernet.

When checking for versions of this cocktail, I did see that other authors frequently call for Brandy instead of Gin. Might be an improvement?

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fantasio Cocktail (No. 1 and No. 2)

Fantasio Cocktail (No. 1)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe.
1/6 Maraschino.
1/3 Brandy.
1/3 Dry Gin.

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

Fantasio Cocktail. (No. 2.)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Maraschino. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Maraschino)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Brandy)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve stared and stared at these two Savoy Cocktail Book recipes for Fantasio No. 1 and No. 2 and can find no difference between them, aside from the shaking detail. In the 1934 edition of Patrick Gavin Duffy’s “Official Mixer’s Manual” they are actually both stirred, but the No. 2 gets a cherry. God knows why there are two versions of this cocktail in either book.

Gin and Brandy isn’t one of those things that really pops into my head as a great combination, so I thought about this one for a while, comparing the gins I had in the house. Eventually, I decided to go with a Jonge Genever. It seemed like the slight maltiness would complement the brandy well.

I also nominally cheated on the recipe ratio. Just couldn’t quite face that much liqueur.

Fantasio, slight variation

1/4 oz Brizard White Crème de Menthe
1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino
3/4 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac
1 oz Boomsma Jonge Genever

Stir, strain, cherry.

Maybe I’m on crack, but this isn’t half bad. Sort of a more complex Stinger. The cherry is a nice touch and I like the flavors it brings towards the end of the cocktail after soaking in the booze.

…Some time later…

Well, this is rather embarrassing.

While the Fantasios in the Savoy Cocktail Book are exactly the same, (excepting the stirring/shaking detail,) I was looking through 1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy for the umpteenth time, and noticed the two Fantasios are slightly different:

Fantasio Cocktail No. 1
1/6 White Creme de Menthe (1/2 of 3/4 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Maraschino (1/2 of 3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/3 Brandy (3/4 oz Señor Lustau Solera Reserva Brandy de Jerez)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz French Vermouth)
Stir well and strain.
Use glass Number 1.

Fantasio Cocktail No. 2
1/6 White Creme de Menthe
1/6 Maraschino
1/3 Brandy
1/3 Italian Vermouth
Stir well in ice and strain. Add a cherry.
Use glass number 1.

Uh, oops! I’ve no explanation for completely missing the fact that he calls for vermouth instead of Gin. I guess sometimes you see what you want to see!?

So that makes it more of a Brandy Manhattan variation, than a, well, whatever the hell the Savoy Brandy and Gin concoction is.

But the big question, is it any better with vermouth?  I tried No 1 exactly as written and unfortunately my answer is, “No, not really.”  Still disgustingly sweet.

However, again, something like this ain’t bad:

2/3 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Señor Lustau Solera Reserva Brandy de Jerez)
1/3 Sweet Vermouth (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1 tsp Creme de Menthe
1 tsp Maraschino Liqueur

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Add a cherry (preferably Luxardo or Toschi).

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fancy Cocktail

Fancy Cocktail
(6 People)
Pour into the shaker 5 glasses of Cognac and a dessertspoonful of Angostura Bitters. Shake thoroughly and serve, adding a little champagne and a piece of lemon-rind after having rubbed the edges of the glasses with lemon syrup.

I usually make this cocktail, something like this:

Fancy Cocktail for one

Rub the rim of a cocktail glass with a slice of lemon. Frost the edge with superfine or caster sugar. Pour into the shaker 2 oz Cognac and a generous dash of Angostura Bitters. Stir with cracked ice until well chilled, and strain into the frosted glass. Top up with a bit of champagne, squeeze a piece of lemon peel over the glass and drop it in.

Cocktail disambiguation via David Wondrich’s “Imbibe!

In Mr. Wondrich’s book, he divides the types of “cocktail” into the following categories, “Original”, “Plain”, “Fancy”, “Improved”, and “Old-Fashioned”.

“Original Cocktail”, is ye olde bittered sling, specification of spirits, bitters, sugar, and water. Nutmeg optional.

“Plain Cocktail” is Gum syrup, bitters, spirits, and curacao served on the rocks with a twist of lemon.

“Fancy Cocktail” is Gum syrup, bitters, spirits, and curacao, stirred with ice, and strained into another glass and garnished with a twist of lemon.

“Improved Cocktail” is Gum syrup, bitters, spirits, maraschino liqueur, absinthe, stirred with ice, strained into another glass and garnished with a twist of lemon.

And “Old-fashioned Cocktail” is the “original” served with rocks instead of water and a lemon twist instead of nutmeg.

Anyway, he notes the “Fancy” category sometimes included a frosted rim, a la Crusta, or a top up of champanski. Hey, who would argue? Though, I wonder what sort of individual would say, “Excuse me barkeep, believe I will have a fancy brandy cocktail, thank you!”

As the “Savoy Cocktail Book” seems to have the most bad luck transcribing these pre-prohibition of cocktails, (see the Savoy “Coffee Cocktail” and “Brandy Crusta” for other poorly transcribed examples,) their “Fancy Cocktail” recipe makes almost no sense. I mean, how can you “rub the edges of a glass with lemon syrup”? Just sounds really messy to me. They have also decided to solidify on Cognac and leave out the Curacao. No tremendous loss there.

I’ve sort of gone with the Chicago method for the “Fancy Cocktail” and left it at that.

I like the “Chicago Cocktail” and I like the “Fancy Cocktail.” Guess that makes me some sort of flannel wearing dandy. Woo!

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Fallen Angel Cocktail

Fallen Angel Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
2 Dashes Crème de Menthe. (1/2 bar spoon Brizard Crème de Menthe)
The Juice of 1 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (Juice 1 lemon)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Aviation Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

It has never been made quite clear as to whether this is intended to be taken by the Angel before or after falling; as an encouragement or as a consolation.

Another of my favorite Savoy quotes.

The recipe is sort of odd. I mean the usual ingredient note for cocktails with choice of lemon or lime is, “Juice of 1 lime or 1/2 lemon,” so the fact that this recommends 1/2 lime or a whole lemon is a bit odd. Unfortunately, it’s not a cocktail whose origins have yet been tracked down, so there’s no real way for me to know if it is a typo or not. I chose lemon, and went a little easy on it.

I picked the Aviation Gin, as it seemed the use of lavender in the herb bill might do something interesting with the mint.

I have to admit I expected to dislike this cocktail. I really didn’t think it could possibly be palatable with that much lemon juice against that little sweetener. But, somehow it is. I dunno, I would call it refreshing.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.