Gene Tunney Cocktail

Gene Tunney Cocktail

1 Dash Orange Juice. (1 tsp. Blood Orange Juice)
1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1 tsp Lemon Juice)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, that is a bit odd…

Gene Tunney

Gene Tunney-bright, good-looking, and an acknowledged pillar of the 1920s’ “Golden Age of Sports”-was never as popular among boxing fans as the man he defeated to become heavyweight champion of the world. Tunney outfought Jack Dempsey in 1926, and he retained the title in the famous “long count” rematch a year later. Tunney’s relative intellectualism, reticence in public, and scientific boxing style distanced him from fight fans and the press. Despite this lack of contemporary acclaim, Tunney is remembered as a great fighter who lost only once in his career and was the first heavyweight champion to retire-and stay retired-as the titleholder.

After invoking Dempsey in the previous cocktail, it turns out Gene Tunney was the man who defeated him in 1926 to become the new heavy weight champion of the world.

Not sure what to say about the cocktail, in the presence of so many heavy weight boxing associations. It is certainly no “Dempsey Cocktail.” I’d almost go so far as to say it’s kind of a proto cosmo. I mean, it is very much a Martini with a touch of citrus juice. I did over pour a bit on the citrus. It should really have been just a half teaspoon or less of each of the juices.

Since Blood Oranges were in season, there was absolutely no way I could resist putting them in this cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gene Corrie Cocktail

Gene Corrie Cocktail

1/2 Hercules. (1 oz YerbaMate/Steepsinthe/Dubonnet Mixture)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Tanqueray Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I suspect the Gene Corri(e) here is Eugene Corri, a rather well known boxing referee who died in 1933. On December 7, 1907, at the fight between Gunner Moir and Tommy Burns, he became the first referee to officiate inside a boxing ring.

He also wrote a Memoir, which is still in print:

Refereeing 1000 Fights – Reminiscences of Boxing
Originally published in 1915, this is a memoir of Eugene Corri’s career as a boxing referee. He refereed all the top fights of the day and speaks at length of both the fights themselves and the boxers who fought them, all of whom he knew well. Well-illustrated with black and white photographs, this is a fascinating glimpse into a vanished era. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Hesperides Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork. Contents Include – The Lucky-Tub of Memory – The Carpentier-Gunboat Smith Fight – Barbardier Wells, with a Word or Two about Carpentier – Robert Fitzsimmons – Willie Ritchie and Freddy Welsh – Matt Wells, Sereant Basham,and Johnny Summers – Wilde The Wizard – Some Boxing Storeys – More Boxing Storeys – Boxing in the War.

Also found this tidbit in the New York times archive from June 19, 1921:

CORRI IS ON WAY HERE.; English Boxing Referee on the Adriatic, Which Docks Friday.

The White Star liner Adriatic is due to arrive from Southampton and Cherbourg early Friday morning with several English and French sportsmen who are coming to see the Dempsey-Carpentier fight on Saturday and have booked their tickets in advance.

The “Battle of the Century,” on July 2, 1921, between Jack Dempsey and Georges Carpentier was the first “million dollar gate” in boxing history. It took the Manassa Mauler 4 rounds and less than 11 minutes to knock the Frenchman Carpentier to the canvas. The fight attracted the largest crowd to a sporting event up to that time, and was one of the first fights broadcast on radio.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gazette Cocktail

Gazette Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Syrup. (1 tsp. Depaz Cane Syrup)
1 Teaspoonful Lemon Juice
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Cerbois VSOP Armangac)

Shake (stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Could go either way, shaking or stirring with this one.

A bit odd and pretty OK as cocktails go. Don’t know of too many cocktails that combine sweet vermouth and citrus, aside from the Bronx. As with the Bronx, I found it significantly improved with a drop or two of Aromatic Bitters (Bitter Truth in this case).

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gasper Cocktail


Gasper Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Gin. (1 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
3 Glasses Absinthe. (1 oz Marteau Verte Classique)
Add, if required, a very little sugar. (1 tsp. Depaz Cane Syrup)

Shake (stir, please) well and serve.

In stark contrast to the Gangadine Cocktail, this is not a girly Absinthe cocktail!

In fact, if there was ever a cocktail that could use a good long time “cooking” on the ice, this is it.

I do have to wonder if the same brilliant, and evil, mixological mind which was behind the Choker Cocktail was also behind the Gasp-er.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Gangadine Cocktail

Gangadine Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Framboise Syrup. (1 tsp Monin Raspberry Syrup)
1/3 Oxygenie Cusenier. (3/4 oz Kubler 53)
1/3 White Mint. (3/4 oz Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater’s Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Wow, is this a pink, girly, and deadly drink. I’d give it points right there along with the Between the Sheets. I picked the Kubler, as previously I’d tried it in a cocktail with mint and thought it quite good. Also good here and didn’t muddy up the drink’s color like a Verte Absinthe would.

I’ve not turned up anything regarding the name, “Gangadine.” Might be a last name.

Oxygénée Cusenier was one of the late-pre ban French Absinthe. It was Oxygenated, supposedly to increase its purity and make it a more healthful beverage. I guess this was an attempt to combat the increasingly strident hue and cry against Absinthe as a beverage in the early 1900s.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Full House Cocktail

Full House Cocktail

1/4 Swedish Punch. (generous 1/2 oz homemade)
1/4 French Vermouth. (generous 1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Bacardi Rum. (generous 1 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze Lemon Peel over glass.)

You may recognize this as the Four Flush Cocktail without the grenadine. I suppose, nominally less sweet than that ridiculously sweet cocktail.

I dunno, as much as I preferred the flavor of the homemade punch, this cocktail seemed to show an unpleasant aspect of the Flor de Cana Rum, pumping up some of the harsher alcohol smells and tastes as I finished the drink.

I’m going to have to try this again side by side with commercial punch. Maybe the next time I have low blood sugar.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Froupe Cocktail

Froupe Cocktail

l Teaspoonful Benedictine.
1/2 Italian vermouth. (generous 1 oz Martini & Rossi Rosso)
1/2 Brandy. (Generous 1 oz Cerbois VSOP Armangac)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

Another Savoy typo, it appears. Robert Vermeire calls this the “Fioupe Cocktail” and states, “Monsieur Fioupe is a familiar figure known all along the Riviera, by everybody, from prince to cabman.”

Sadly, I can’t find any more information than that regarding Monsieur Fioupe.

The cocktail, though, being basically a Brandy version of the Bobby Burns, is right in my comfort zone. Yum.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Froth Blower Cocktail

Froth Blower Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (homemade)
1 Glass Plymouth Gin. (2 oz Tanqueray Gin)

Shake well and strain into port wine glass.

As someone who is interested in technique, egg whites frustrate me. Sometimes you get a good amount, and sometimes they don’t work. This isn’t totally shabby, I suppose. A good eighth to a quarter inch. Still, darn that Thomas Waugh, currently at Alembic. I don’t know how he consistently gets an half inch or more every time he makes an egg white drink.

The drink is, well, gin and egg whites with a touch of grenadine, which seemed enough of an epitath until I googled “froth blower” and discovered the Ancient Order of Froth Blowers or AOFW.

“A sociable and law abiding fraternity of absorbitive Britons who sedately consume and quietly enjoy with commendable regularity and frequention the truly British malted beverage as did their forbears and as Brittons ever will, and be damned to all pussyfoot hornswogglers from overseas and including low brows, teetotalers and MP`s and not excluding nosey parkers, mock religious busy bodies and suburban fool hens all of which are structurally solid bone from the chin up.”

Whose slogan, “Lubrication in Moderation,” seems as apt today as ever.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

French “75” Cocktail

The French “75” Cocktail

2/3 Gin. (1 1/2 oz Aviation Gin)
1/3 Lemon Juice (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1 Spoonful Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp. Caster Sugar)

(Shake with ice?) Pour into tall glass containing cracked ice and fill up with Champagne (Louis Bouillot, Cremant de Bourgogne Rose ”Perle d’Aurore”).

Hits with remarkable precision.

Visually quite attractive to use a Rose Champagne …errr… Cremant de Bourgogne here.

The French “75” and 75 cocktail have been discussed in some detail in the following eGullet topic:

Frank Meier & the “Soixante-Quinze”, Frank, of the Ritz, had a 75 cocktail.

Long story short, there are two cocktails, the “75” Cocktail, (grenadine, Gin, Calvados, and lemon juice. served up.) and the French “75” cocktail, (Gin, sugar, lemon, crushed ice. Top up with champagne.) Both are apparently named after a French field gun of some sort used during World War I.

I guess the most common mis-conception about the French “75” is that it is made with Brandy or Cognac instead of Gin. On more than one occasion, out in bars, I’ve heard it ordered that way.

The other big thing is ice or no ice. Judge Jr., Patrick Gavin Duffy, and the Savoy Cocktail Book, all say cracked ice in a tall glass. It seems like it is more common these days to skip the ice and just build it in a champagne flute. I’ve made them without ice in the past, and thought the over ice version this time was quite refreshing. It seems like it would be nice on a hot day.

I shook the gin, lemon, and sugar with ice before adding it to the iced glass, because it seemed kind of weird not to mix them. I guess you could just dump the sugar in there? Or mix them in the bottom of the tall glass a bit before adding the ice?

Judge Jr., in his book, “Here’s How” makes the illuminating connection, quoted below:

This drink is really what won the War for the Allies: 2 jiggers Gin; 1 part lemon juice; a spoonful of powdered sugar; cracked ice. Fill up the rest of a tall glass with champagne! (If you use club soda instead of champagne, you have a Tom Collins.)

So basically nothing more than a Deluxe Tom Collins.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.