BOTW–E.S. Bam

When at City Beer recently, one of the beers that caught our eye was E.S. Bam from Jolly Pumpkin Artisan Ales.

E.S. Bam

We’ve tried a couple Jolly Pumpkin beers, and always enjoyed them.  In fact, their La Roja was a Beer of the Week just last April.

But when we read the back of the bottle, being sentimental dog lovers, we knew we had to try this one.

Back Label

E.S. Bam is an interesting beer. Unusual for an ESB, or Farmhouse Ale, in that it is very dry. In fact, probably one of the least sweet beers I’ve had in a long time. It is also probably a bit hoppier than most ESBs or Farmhouse Ales.

A bit on the light side, character-wise, I could see this being an enjoyable hot weather beer. It is also below 5% ABV, so it’s something you could drink a fair bit of. Even though I would give it more of a “very good” than an “outstanding” it is a well made and fun beer to drink.

Foam

“Everything But” Cocktail

“Everything But” Cocktail

1/4 Whisky. (3/4 oz Compass Box blended Asyla Scotch Whisky)
1/4 Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Orange Juice. (3/4 oz Fresh Orange Juice)
1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful of Apricot brandy. (1 teaspoon Rothman & Winter Marillen Apricot Eau-de-Vie)
Powdered Sugar. (scant teaspoon caster sugar)

(Combine ingredients in shaker without ice and shake for 10 seconds. Add big ice…) Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Bunch of new technology here. First off, I finally scored a few 18oz cheater tins to top my 28 oz boston shakers. These are spiffy and seem nominally less messy when making egg drinks. Second we have the big sturdy tovolo ice cubes being employed instead of regular refrigerator ice. Third, I’m continuing my experiments with dry shaking. Fourth, given the size of this cocktail, I got to get out my bigger coupes.


Now, if the lovely texture of the egg in the first picture wasn’t enough, this second one with a clear half inch of delicious foam should indicate progress is being made.

Regarding ingredients, many of the cocktails calling for simply “Whisky” in the “Savoy Cocktail Book” are from Judge Jr.’s 1927 “Here’s How”. In that book Scotch is specified. I went with the Apricot Eau-de-Vie instead of liqueur, as there was already plenty of sugar here, and I like Eau-de-Vies in egg cocktails.

I kind of thought I was getting tired of sour cocktails, but this one is quite tasty and fairly complex. “Velvety,” would be a good word for it. I really enjoyed it.

Regarding the name, Judge Jr. sez, “This little drink is christened thusly because it contains everything but the kitchen stove!”

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.