Drinky Sorbets

As it is ice cream season, here are a couple drinky sorbet recipes I’ve had good luck serving at parties.

Don’t push the amount of alcohol, or you’ll end up with slushies instead of sorbet.

Mojito Sorbet

1 cup sugar
2 cups water
5 sprigs of mint
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1/8 cup rum
Zest of 2 limes
2 tablespoons mint chiffonade

Makes 4-6 servings.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine sugar and water until the sugar dissolves. Add the mint sprigs; stir until mixture comes to a boil; reduce heat to low and simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand approximately 10 minutes.

Place a fine strainer over a large bowl and pour syrup mixture through (straining out the mint). Add lime juice, rum, and lime zest to the strained syrup mixture and stir to combine. Chill.

If you have an ice cream maker, process according to manufacturers instructions. About 5 minutes before it is finished processing, add the mint chiffonade to the freezing mixture. Store in a sealed container in the freezer.

If you do not have an ice cream maker, chill an stainless steel or pyrex pan in your freezer. The sorbet mixture should not come up more than an inch along the side of the pan. Add mixture to pan, and stir with a fork every hour until well frozen. After it freezes process in batches in a blender or food processor, stir in mint chiffonade, and store in a sealed container in the freezer.

Moro Decay Sorbet

1 c Sugar
1 c Water
1 c Moro Blood Orange Juice
1/8 c Bourbon
Zest of 2 Moro Blood Oranges
1 tsp. Angostura Bitters

Makes 4-6 servings.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine sugar and water until the sugar dissolves. Simmer for 5 minutes. Cool.

Zest oranges into bourbon and stir to combine. Add blood orange juice, bitters and cooled syrup. Chill.

Strain mixture through cheesecloth and squeeze out as much liquid as possible.

If you have an ice cream maker, process according to manufacturers instructions.

If you do not have an ice cream maker, chill an stainless steel or pyrex pan in your freezer. The sorbet mixture should not come up more than an inch along the side of the pan. Add mixture to pan, and stir with a fork every hour until well frozen. After it freezes, process in batches in a blender or food processor and store in a sealed container in the freezer.

Cuban Cocktail (No. 2)

Cuban Cocktail (No. 2)

The Juice of 1/2 Lime or ΒΌ Lemon. (Juice 1/4 Lemon)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz Apricot liqueur)
2/3 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I thought I would take this opportunity to do a bit of an Apricot liqueur taste off.

Liqueur Line UP

From left to right we have Brizard Apry, Vedrenne Liqueur de Abricot, Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot, and homemade.

Apry

First we tried the Brizard Apry. I’m not all that familiar with the Brizard Apry, only having used it a couple times now. Every time I’m struck by the cherry scent and flavor. Not quite sure what that is about. Reminds me a bit of Apricot flavored candies.

Vedrenne Apricot

Sigh, the Vedrenne Apricot liqueur reminds me of Apricot pancake syrup. There is am almost maple-ish flavor there, and that of concentrated dried apricots.

R&W Apricot

Again struck by the fresh apricot smell of the Orchard Apricot. Mrs. Underhill actually thought this cocktail seemed a bit sweeter than the Brizard cocktail. Again, though, a stronger flavor of fresh apricot, rather than apricot-cherry-almond candy.

Homemade Apricot

My homemade apricot liqueur was one of the first that convinced me that, in some cases, commercial producers can often do a much better job than I. Very little apricot flavor despite it being a whole fruit infusion.

Apricot Cocktails

Not sure what this means; but, the Apry and the Vedrenne cocktails were foamier than those made with the R&W and homemade liqueurs.

Cocktail itself is all right. The flavors didn’t really compel me to finish any of the 4 versions; but, I didn’t resent tasting it. Not entirely convinced by the Maison Surenne as a mixing brandy. I think something with a few more teeth might make for more interesting cocktails. Maybe investigate some of the more reasonable Armagnac.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.