Bronx (Silver) Cocktail

Bronx (Silver) Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange
The White of 1 Egg
1/4 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Boodles Gin)

Shake well and strain into large wine glass.

Haven’t quite decided what I think of the Boodles.

It was on sale, so I figured I had little to lose. Flavor-wise it seems most similar to Plymouth Gin. Much lighter, though.

The other night I tried it in my usual Martini (2 oz Gin, 1/2 oz Vermouth, dash orange bitters). To me the flavor of the Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth was really the dominant element in the cocktail. It also really seemed to call out for an olive, rather than my usual lemon twist.

Here, in the Bronx (Silver), something with a little more spine, like Tanqueray, might be more appropriate. Still, all in all, a fine Sunday cocktail.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Bronx Cocktail

Bronx Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange (Juice 1 Page Mandarin)
1/4 French Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth (1 oz Carpano Punt e Mes)
1/2 Dry Gin (1 oz Beefeater’s Gin, 1 oz Tanqueray Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Ahem, this did end up a bit on the extra-large size. But, really, the Bronx is one of my favorite cocktails and I was thirsty.

I hardly ever get to use Punt e Mes for anything, so its bitter kick seemed like a good idea. Finished off the nearly empty Beefeater’s and Tanqueray bottles. The orange we had in the fridge was in worse shape than I had remembered, so the mandarin had to stand in.

I’ve read a number of sources that say the Bronx was something of a cocktail non grata in the 40s and 50s. I don’t really understand why. Especially, if you squeeze the quarter of a juice orange right over the mixing shaker, the light fresh orange juice flavor and the smell of the slightly sharp orange oils are quite pleasant, combining with the gin and vermouths. I’ll admit I am slightly more partial to the “Income Tax” or “Bronx with Bitters” so using Punt e Mes gets me closer to that drink.

Is the derision heaped on the Bronx because of too much orange juice? Bad syrupy orange juice from concentrate? Bathtub Gin hangovers? Something we can blame on Anita Bryant?

Probably not; but, ditch the Minute Maid from concentrate, and rediscover this classic the way it’s meant to be.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Broken Spur Cocktail

Broken Spur Cocktail

1 Egg Yolk
2/3 White Port (2 oz Quinto do Infantado White Port)
1/6 Dry Gin (1 oz Tanqueray)
1/6 Gancia Vermouth (1 oz Cinzano Rosso Vermouth)
1 teaspoon Brisard (sic.) Anisette (1 teaspoon Anis del Mono Dulce)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with freshly grated nutmeg. – eje)

Once again, my poor grasp of fractions betrayed me. I thought the vermouth seemed a bit heavy in the flavor profile.

This would be more accurate:

1 Egg Yolk
1 1/2 oz White Port
1/2 of 3/4 oz Dry Gin
1/2 of 3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth
1 teaspoon anisette

The drink seemed a little flat to start out with. The nutmeg, (not pictured), punched it up greatly, and I highly recommend adding it as a garnish.

The drink itself is one of the better eggey flip-ey things I’ve tried. Liked it much more than I expected.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Underhill Punsch II

In the quest to make a Swedish Punch Clone, I had combined two Jerry Thomas recipes and made a variation using Sri Lankan Arrack. While interesting, I later discovered it wasn’t very Similar to Swedish Punch.

I re-used the same procedure recently using Batavia Arrack.

This was what I did:

Underhill Punsch II

1 cup Appleton V/X Rum
1/2 cup Batavia Arrack
1 cup hot extra strong tea (2 tsp Peet’s Lung Ching Dragonwell tea brewed in 1 cup water)
1 cup sugar
1 lemon sliced thinly, seeds removed
1 lime sliced thinly, seeds removed

Put sliced lemon and lime in a resealable non-reactive container large enough to hold 4 cups of liquid. Pour Rum and Batavia Arrack over citrus. Cover and steep for 6 hours.

Dissolve sugar in hot tea and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate.

After 6 hours, pour rum off of sliced citrus, without squeezing fruit.

Combine tea syrup and flavored rum. Filter and bottle in a clean sealable container. Age at least overnight and enjoy where Swedish Punch is called for.

The interaction between the Chinese green tea and the lime gives this an interesting flavor. One person who tried it compared it to the bitter greens they’d just had in their salad. Just on its own, at room temperature, this is a little much, as the intense bitter lime aftertaste tends to linger on the palate. Over ice, though, it is quite a pleasant beverage. I’m going to be interested to see how this variation mixes.

Broadway Smile Cocktail

Broadway Smile Cocktail

1/3 Creme de Cassis (Brizard Cassis de Bourdeaux)
1/3 Swedish Punch (Facile Swedish Punch)
1/3 Cointreau

Use liqueur glass and pour carefully so that ingredients do not mix.

Of the layered liqueur cocktails I’ve tried so far, I have to say this is my favorite. Unfortunately, it involves an ingredient you’re going to need to make yourself, Swedish Punch.

The Facile Swedish Punsch arrived to me via the kindness of internet acquaintances.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Breakfast Cocktail

Breakfast Cocktail

1/3 Grenadine (3/4 oz homemade)
2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
The White of 1 Egg

Shake well and strain into large wine glass.

A slightly grenadinier “Pink Lady”? Nom de cocktail so men can order a pink cocktail with grenadine and gin without being embarrassed?

I’m fond of grenadine and gin, so had no problems drinking this down.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

BOTW–Anchor Steam, Again!?

When I was thinking about this, I realized that Anchor Steam is just about the only beer I’ve drunk this week. At home, at Cantina, at Weird Fish. Even when we were at Orson for the Bourbon and Bacon Dinner, when they included a beer with one of the courses it was Anchor Liberty Ale.

Fortunately, we made a trip to the liquor store today and got some interesting looking treats, so the coming weeks should be a bit more exciting.

Next week I’m hoping to take Beer Of The Week on the road, heading down to Magnolia Brewing and check out the bar after the remodel. New bar made from recovered redwood planks from the Levi Strauss Building, new menu, new sausage program, new concentration on local and sustainable food, it all sounds quite delightful.

Brazil Cocktail

Brazil Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1 Dash Absinthe (1/4 barspoon Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
1/2 French Vermouth (2 oz Noilly Prat)
1/2 Sherry (2 oz Lustau Solera Reserva Dry Oloroso Sherry “Don Nuño”)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

The Absinthe and Lemon add a nice flavor to the Sherry and Vermouth. The flavors were actually more interesting as it warmed in the glass than when I first poured it. Still, not something I would likely choose to sample again.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.

Pain and Fame

I don’t normally put up links to articles, but there were a couple articles this week on local sources that you might not see if you aren’t in the Bay Area.

First off, over at line cook, Richie has an absolutely fantastic post called “A Day in the Life” documenting a typical shift at the restaurant he works in. All I can say is “ouch”.

Second, Duggan McDonnell, proprietor of Cantina Bar wrote a great article about fame and bartending for Marcia Gagliardi’s weekly ecolumn Tablehopper. I liked this paragraph particularly:

On a recent Saturday as I closed the bar I was thinking more and more about all of this. I’d returned earlier in the week from Miami where I was awarded a Rising Star at the Cheers Beverage Conference. I’d worked and traveled all week; and this night, I’d been on my feet for fourteen hours. I sat and looked around the place, at my back-bar full of bottles, several hundred strong, shelves lined with boutique and imported spirits, and there I sat with the lights all up, the saccharine scent of crushed citrus and burnt wax in the air; broken glass, matches and mint underfoot. And I recalled Toby Cecchini’s words from Cosmopolitan, A Bartender’s Life: “There is an ephemeral hour then when the bar, like a woman d’un certain age, cleverly cloaked in evening light to conceal flaws she knows are beneath consideration, glows with an imperfect, hard-used loveliness.” This was not that hour.

Brandy Vermouth Cocktail

Brandy Vermouth Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1/4 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso)
3/4 Brandy (2 1/4 oz Pierre Ferrand Cognac Ambre)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass

For some reason I didn’t have much hope for this cocktail. Maybe the not very original name? Or perhaps I expected the Italian Vermouth to overpower the Cognac?

In any case, here’s another Savoy cocktail that defied my expectations.

Tasty and complex. The vermouth nicely underscores elements of the Cognac without overpowering it. The dash of bitters punches it up slightly. The elements combine for some subtle cherry-ish flavors you wouldn’t expect from any of the components. Nice.

This post is one in a series documenting my ongoing effort to make all of the cocktails in the Savoy Cocktail Book, starting at the first, Abbey, and ending at the last, Zed.